Runaways: Maroon Or Seminole Communities

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For over 400 years,Runaway slaves would all come together and start communities in different parts of Southeast America, South America, even parts of Florida .These new social orders went from small groups that survived not as much as a year to effective states holding a huge number of individuals that made due for eras and even hundreds of years. Today their offspring still shape some independent spaces in a few sections of the world, in French Guiana, Jamaica, Colombia and Belize are proud of where they came from. Maroon or Seminole Communities,known in parts of Florida, were referred to as a group of runaways or castaways who ran away to nowhere and nothing. Which also correlates with where the word maroon comes from. Maroon comes from the spanish word …show more content…
The first escapes happened in 1512 from spanish captors and either joined indigenous peoples or made out a living on their own. In 1655 communities were developed in places such as Jamaica.In the carribeans they formed groups which turned into whole communities and some islands had their own weapons. Maroon(Seminole) communities faced obstacles to survive from colonists, obtain food for good living, and to increase their numbers.On smaller islands the maroon settlers often were pushed out or deeper in the woods due to the fact that the people already there would use more and more land because they were planting more and using more space.On larger islands the marooners had more space to hunt and also plant comfortably without the worry of being forced out.As more Blacks got away from slavery and joined their groups they began to become even more developed. The maroon settlers were nomadic and precarious. That meant that they were dependent on circumstances beyond one's control .Midst of their situations their survival relied on using guerrilla strategies and home building by including traps and

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