Role of chorus

Powerful Essays
INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE, LITERATURE
Int.J.Eng.Lang.Lit & Trans.Studies
AND TRANSLATION STUDIES (IJELR) Vol.2.S1.2015 (Special Issue)
A QUARTERLY, INDEXED, REFEREED AND PEER REVIEWED OPEN ACCESS
INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL http://www.ijelr.in KY PUBLICATIONS

RESEARCH ARTICLE
Vol.2.S.1.,2015

THE ROLE OF THE CHORUS IN T.S.ELIOT’S "MURDER IN THE CATHEDRAL"
ANKITA MANUJA
Research Scholar, Department of English and Cultural Studies, Panjab University, Chandigarh, India
ABSTRACT
In this paper, I analyze the role of chorus in TS Eliot’s verse drama
Murder in the Cathedral(1935). The chorus, which acts as a mouthpiece of
Eliot, creates a distancing effect , gives the spectators a lens through which they can find a reflection of themselves as a stranger , a watcher and as a critic. The chorus which had undergone a renewal in the twentieth century
,portraying a sense of resurgence in theater broke with the chimera of naturalism of late nineteenth century in drama.
ANKITA MANUJA
Article Info:
Article Received:31/03/2015
Revised on: 05/04/2015
Accepted on: 08/04/2015

Keywords: Chorus , verse drama , objective correlative , murder , dramatist
©COPY RIGHT ‘KY PUBLICATIONS’

INTRODUCTION
T .S.Eliot is one of the most distinguished poets of twentieth century literature. He got great acclaim for his poem- The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock (1915), considered as one of the masterpieces produced by him. He wrote some of the greatest and best-known poems namely, The Waste Land (1922), The Hollow Men
(1925), Ash Wednesday (1930), and Four Quartets (1945). He was awarded with the Nobel Prize in Literature in
1948, for his impeccable contribution in the field of literature.
Born in 1888 into a Boston Brahmin family with roots in England and New England, Eliot’s preoccupation with literature started at an early age with his readings of Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Tom
Sawyer(1876).From the year 1898 to 1905, Eliot studied in the Smith Academy, where he studied Latin,



Cited: Browne, E. Martin. The Making of T.S. Eliot 's Plays. London: Cambridge University Press, 1969. Eliot, T. S. “Hamlet and His Problems.” 5 April. 2007. http://www.bartleby.com/200/sw9.html Tiwari, Maneesha.The Plays of T.S. Eliot. Atlantic Publishers & Dist, 2007.Print. Wortmann, Simon, 'The Concept of Ecriture Feminine in Helene Cixous 's the Laugh of the Medusa ', Grin Verlag, 2013. Wikipedia contributors. Murder in the Cathedral Wikipedia , The Free Encyclopedia. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 9 Dec.2014.Web ANKITA MANUJA 14

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