Reflections and Analysis on Tao te Ching

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Reflections and Analysis on Tao te Ching

Tao te Ching was written around the 6th century BC by the sage, Lao-Tzu, a record- archiver for the Zhou dynasty court, which was a Chinese dynasty from c.1046–256 BC. The

book is a fundamental text for both philosophical, and religious Taoism and it is one of the three

major systems of thought in China along with Confucianism and Buddhism. Tao literally means

“way,” Te means “virtue,” and Ching means “canon.” Thus Tao-te Ching is a compound noun

meaning “morality way.” From ancient time to nowadays, people from different professions,

from diverse cultural backgrounds and experiences from various stages of their lives use Tao te

Ching as a source of inspiration, meditation, and exhortation. Its influence has also spread

widely outside East Asia; indeed, it is one of the most translated works in the world. There have

been numerous studies of Taoism in literature, philosophy, religion and communication. I

usually just consult the text for encouragement, concentration and admonition. From a studying

perceptive, in terms of stylistic structure, persuasive techniques or rhetorical devices, Lao-Tzu

wisely utilizes juxtaposition, as a literary device with open interpretation in a reasonable and

calm tone. He carefully selects words to repeat certain points throughout the book to develop his

voice. Considering how Lao-Tzu utilizes methods with eclectic words in repetition structure, one

will discover Lao-Tzu not only portrays a united image of Tao by creating a shared message, but

also guides people to comprehend the real affairs of the society and furthermore persuade his

readers to adopt a Tao way of thinking.

As a persuasive poet, Lao-Tzu undoubtedly draws readers into questioning Tao by

stating “The tao that can be told is not the eternal Tao. The name that can be named is not the

eternal name...Yet mystery and manifestations arise from the same

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