Reasons for Successful D-Day Landings

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“The main reason for the success of the D-Day landings was the careful planning of the Allies.”

How far do sources A-F support this statement? (16)

There are a number of reasons for why the D-Day landings were successful, one of which was the extensive preparation and planning of the Allies – for many months before the operation itself. Sources A-F support this hypothesis in varied amounts.

Firstly source A overall doesn’t support the hypothesis as it shows how the Germans were unprepared for any landings at all, and doesn’t directly mention the planning that we know from background knowledge, influenced the complacency of the German generals. The source states, “ The German Air Force reported no sudden concentration of shipping in the ports o Dover, Folkestone and along the Thames.” This statement shows that the Germans didn’t know where to look for Allied forces and didn’t expect attacks until later. This is reinforced further as: “ (Rommel) chose now to go and see Hitler. His wife’s birthday was on 6 June, so he could combine business with pleasure.” This complacency suggests that the Germans were not prepared for attacks at that moment. However A does slightly support the statement, as it shows that the planning, which had gone into deceiving the German forces, had succeeded.

Source B supports the hypothesis to an extent, stating: “ they are not going to come yet, and when they do it’ll be at Calais.” This statement shows that the deception planned by the Allies has worked as the Germans expected the Armies to land at Calais, on a different day than was actually planned. However, the General talking in B also says: “If I know the British, they’ll go to church next Sunday one last time and then sail on Monday.” This suggests more complacency on the part of the German generals, and downplays the importance of the Allied planning, meaning that Source B actually slightly disagrees with the hypothesis.

Source C disagrees to an extent with the

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