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Reading Philosophies

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Reading Philosophies
Running head: Reading

Reading Philosophies
Monica
Grand Canyon University-EED 470
March 17, 2013

Reading Philosophies: Chart Comparison

|Reading Philosophies |Definition |Reading Activity |Assessments |
| |This theory believes that past experiences |During whole group instruction, students will read|Assessments through participation. Is the student|
|Constructivist |and cultural belief can influence the |along with the teacher a book. |responding or actively participating in class |
| |learning along with interactions of other |Teacher will give the student a project on a topic|discussions |
| |students in the classroom. |and then will present it in front of the class |Mind mapping will have the students list and |
| |In a classroom that utilizes the theory of |Have the students watch a clip or a movie and then|categorize new concepts |
| |constructivism, there would be: |the teacher will conduct a discussion afterwards |Pre-assessments allows the teacher to know what |
| |Vigorous participation |Teacher can take the students on a field trip to |the students know and what topics they will need |
| |Small group interactions |relate real world experiences to the concepts |to be taught |
| |New concepts shown within context |learned in class |Hands on activities assess how the students can |
| |Previous knowledge used to create new |



References: Baines, L. A., & Stanley, G. (2000). 'We Want to See the Teacher. '. Phi Delta Kappan, 82(4), 327. Kamps, D., Abbott, M., Greenwood, C., Wills, H., Veerkamp, M., & Kaufman, J. (2008). Effects of Small-Group Reading Instruction and Curriculum Differences for Students Most at Risk in Kindergarten. Journal Of Learning Disabilities, 41(2), 101-114. Parsons, S. A., Davis, S. G., Scales, R. Q., Williams, B., & Kear, K. A. (2010). How AND WHY TEACHERS ADAPT THEIR LITERACY INSTRUCTION. College Reading Association Yearbook, (31), 221-236. Slavin, R. E. (2009). Educational Psychology. In R. E. Slavin, Educational Psychology (pp. 30-44). Upper Saddle River: Pearson Education, Inc. Sonbul, S., & Schmitt, N. (2010). Direct teaching of vocabulary after reading: is it worth the effort?. ELT Journal: English Language Teachers Journal, 64(3), 253-260. doi:10.1093/elt/ccp059 Truscott, D. M., & Truscott, S. D. (2004). A professional development model for the positive practice of school-based reading consultation. Psychology In The Schools, 41(1), 51-65.

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