Questions: United States Constitution and Court Question Options

Topics: United States Constitution, Supreme Court of the United States, United States Congress Pages: 23 (6147 words) Published: November 2, 2014

Question 1 1 / 1 point
Commercial speech, such as advertising, is restricted far more extensively than expressions of opinion on religious, political, or other matters. True
False
Question 2 1 / 1 point
The Bill of Rights allows a group to hold a spontaneous demonstration anytime, anywhere, and anyway it chooses. True
False
Question 3 1 / 1 point
In the case of Roe v. Wade (1973), the Supreme Court outlawed any state laws to restrict a woman's right to an abortion at any point in her pregnancy. True
False
Question 4 1 / 1 point
In the decades since the Miranda decision, the Supreme Court has made no exceptions to its requirements. True
False
Question 5 1 / 1 point
Slander refers to making spoken statements known to be false that are malicious and tend to damage a person's reputation, and the courts have ruled that such spoken defamations are not protected by freedom of speech. True

False
Question 6 1 / 1 point
The right to privacy is specifically guaranteed in the Bill of Rights. True
False
Question 7 1 / 1 point
Nowhere does the Bill of Rights explicitly state that Americans have a right to privacy. True
False
Question 8 1 / 1 point
The Fifth Amendment forbids forced self-incrimination, stating that no person "shall be compelled to be a witness against himself." True
False
Question 9 1 / 1 point
The Courts have repeatedly supported the exercise of prior restraint. True
False
Question 10 1 / 1 point
The Supreme Court has ruled that the death penalty violates the equal protection of the law guaranteed by the Fourteenth Amendment. True
False
ttempt 1
Written: Jun 28, 2014 10:23 AM - Jun 28, 2014 10:30 AM
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Question 1 0 / 1 point
According to the text, there is no doubt that the revolutionary expansion of channels and Web sites anticipated in the near future is likely to enhance the political interest and involvement of young people. True

False
Question 2 1 / 1 point
Public goods are things that everyone shares, such as clean air. True
False
Question 3 1 / 1 point
In a democracy, public officials are supposed to pay attention to the problems that concern voters. True
False
Question 4 1 / 1 point
Laissez-faire economic policies promote free markets and limited government. True
False
Question 5 1 / 1 point
Most western nations have a system of national health insurance through the government that provides most health care. True
False
Question 6 1 / 1 point
All issues on the government's policy agenda are carefully considered by public officials. True
False
Question 7 1 / 1 point
A political issue arises when people disagree about a problem or about a public policy choice made to combat a problem. True
False
Question 8 1 / 1 point
Pluralist theory holds that because so many groups compete for power in the United States, none has a majority say and public policy roughly approximates the public interest. True
False
Question 9 0 / 1 point
Elite theorists believe that whoever is elected to office in the federal government has little influence on policymaking. True
False
Question 10 1 / 1 point
It is clear that ordinary citizens can make sound political judgments on technical issues in our society. True
False
Question 1 1 / 1 point
The Declaration of Independence was written primarily by James Madison. True
False
Question 2 1 / 1 point
The philosophy of the writers of the Constitution was based in part on the belief that the principal object of government was the preservation of property. True
False
Question 3 1 / 1 point
Most delegates to the Constitutional Convention in 1787 held a cynical view of human nature. True
False
Question 4 1 / 1 point
According to James Madison, factions arise from the unequal distribution of property. True
False
Question 5 1 / 1 point
The Connecticut Compromise at the Constitutional Convention led to an agreement that slaves would be counted...
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