Neuroticism and Drug Abuse

Topics: Drug addiction, Big Five personality traits, Substance abuse Pages: 7 (2542 words) Published: March 10, 2011
Neuroticism in Association with Drug Abuse
Kourtney

Abstract
Research on neuroticism, a primary division of personality, is extensive: many studies have found that scores of neuroticism are relate and are predictive of life stress, emotional and psychological disorders, and substance abuse. Personality was inventoried using the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R) and the Eysenck Personality Inventory (EPI). An individual’s drug abuse was consistently evaluated in the literature by means of self-report. With a reliable and valid measurement of neuroticism it is possible to run a statistical analysis between constructs like drug abuse believed to correlate with the trait and find the results considerable. Literature has shown that personality constructs can be predictive of such disorders as substance abuse and that individuals who score high in neuroticism have high drug abuse potential. Consistent limitations included use of self-report data and young age of participants. Future research aims to correct these problems and delve deeper into the relationship between neuroticism and drug abuse.

Neuroticism in Relationship to Drug Abuse
Personality traits are frequently associated with personal choices and are regarded as the primary forces in producing life outcomes. Because aspects of personality are readily relevant to many areas of life, it is extremely important that we explore thoroughly the widely accepted inclusive personality constructs of the Five-Factor Model of personality (Terracciano, Lockenhoff, Crum, Bienvenu, & Costa, 2008). Neuroticism, characterized by frequent anxiety and negative thoughts, is one of the five factors commonly assessed in regard to life outcomes, specifically in research of maladaptive life choices. One outcome to look at is drug abuse, using a substance in a detrimental way, as it not only affects the individual’s life but also society as a whole. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate, by review of research and literature, whether individuals high in neuroticism are those likely to abuse drugs. Neuroticism

Surprisingly, half of the articles reviewed for this paper did not contain a clear definition of neuroticism, leaving readers to apply previous knowledge of the trait (Ball, Tennen, Poling, Kranzler, & Rounsaville, 1997; Grekin, Sher, & Wood, 2006; Kornør & Nordvik, 2007; Narayan, Shams, Jain, & Gupta, 1997). Ormel, Rosmalen, & Farmer (2004) assess trait neuroticism as having anxiety, negative thoughts, and emotional instability. Other literature includes depression and vulnerability to the construct definition (Cyders & Smith, 2008). Research on neuroticism, a primary division of personality, is extensive: many studies have found that scores of neuroticism are relate and are predictive of life stress, emotional and psychological disorders, and substance abuse (Ormel et al., 2004). A meta-analysis of 175 published studies on Big Five personality traits and anxiety, depressive and substance use maladies observed that neuroticism is the most significant correlate with the construct of drug abuse (Kotov, Gamez, Schmidt, & Watson, 2010). The scales used in the research of these studies are vital in assessment of such findings; if the measurement of the construct is not thorough and accurate then the findings may not be considerable. Measuring Neuroticism

There are two inventories of personality that are consistent in all literature used for this paper: the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R) and the Eysenck Personality Inventory (EPI) (Ball et al., 1997; Cyders and Smith, 2008; Grekin et al., 2006; Kornør & Nordvik, 2007; Kotov et al., 2010; Narayan et al., 1997; Ormel et al., 2004; Terracciano et al., 2008). It’s important to discuss these scales because they serve as the starting point for research: in order to draw conclusions about constructs they must first be viably measured. The NEO-PI-R, or a shortened...

References: Ball, S., Tennen, H., Poling, J., Kranzler, H., & Rounsaville, B. (1997). Personality,
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Grekin, E., Sher, K., & Wood, P. (2006). Personality and substance dependence symptoms:
Modeling substance-specific traits
Kornør, H., & Nordvik, H. (2007). Five-factor model personality traits in opioid dependence.
BMC Psychiatry, 7doi:10.1186/1471-244X-7-37.
Kotov, R., Gamez, W., Schmidt, F., & Watson, D. (2010). Linking “big” personality traits to
anxiety, depressive, and substance use disorders: A meta-analysis
Narayan, R., Shams, G., Jain, R., & Gupta, B. (1997). Personality characteristics of persons
addicted to heroin
Ormel, J., Rosmalen, J., & Farmer, A. (2004). Neuroticism: A non-informative marker of
vulnerability to psychopathology
Terracciano, A., Löckenhoff, C., Crum, R., Bienvenu, O., & Costa, P. (2008). Five-Factor Model
personality profiles of drug users
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