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Murder of Helen Jewett

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Murder of Helen Jewett
In The Murder of Helen Jewett, Patricia Cohen uses one of the most trivial murders during the 1800's to illustrate the sexiest society accommodations to the privileged, hypocritical tunneled views toward sexual behavior, and the exploitation of legal codes, use of tabloid journalism, and politics. Taking the fact that woman was made from taking a rib from man was more than biblical knowledge, but incorporated into the male belief that a woman's place is determined by the man. Helen had the proper rearing a maid servant, but how did she fall so far from grace. Judge Weston properly takes credit for rearing her with the proper strictness and education. Was Helen seduced at an early age and introduced to sexual perversions that were more persuasive that the bible belt life that the Weston's tried to live? Was Helen simply a woman who knew how to use what she had to get what she wanted? Through personal correspondence, legal documentation, census reports, paintings, and newspapers we are able to make our on determinations. Cohen provides more than enough background and history to allow any one to make their own opinion how the murder of a woman could be turned into a side show at a circus. Helen Jewett, a prominent New York prostitute, was murdered and not only was this rare but a heinous crime. Helen's murder brought to the forefront the industry of prostitution. This would include the owners, managers, and the clients. In the Victorian era, in New York City, men and women roles within the society were as different as night and day. A man regardless of his extra curricular activities could still maintain a very prevalent place in society. A woman's worth was not only based family name which distinguished her class and worth, but also her profession if that was applicable. During this time in society the industry of prostitution was an economic gold mine. The women operate the brothel while very distinguished men in the community own and take care

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