Crucible Analysis

Topics: The Crucible, Salem witch trials, Mary Warren Pages: 2 (266 words) Published: February 12, 2009
The Crucible Analysis - Act Three

Why do Giles Corey & Francis Nurse want to speak to the court?

What does Giles Corey mean when he says that he “broke charity with the women (his wife)”?

What does Danforth say is the reason that the court (“the state”) accepts what the girls are saying?

What is Reverend Parris’ argument against John Proctor?

How is Elizabeth Proctor’s current condition a benefit to her?

Why has Mary Warren come to court?

Danforth states “a person is either with this court or he must be counted against it, there be no road between.” Explain the significance behind Danforth’s statement.

According to Giles Corey, why is Thomas Putnam is making the accusations that he is?

What happens to Giles Corey as a result of his actions in court?

What does Mary Warren claim in her deposition to the court?

What “test” does Hathorne think up for Mary Warren? What does Hathorne hope to prove with this “test”?

How do the girls attempt to get the court to believe their word over Mary Warren’s claims?

What does John Proctor admit to the court?

Why isn’t John Proctor allowed to look at Elizabeth Proctor when she comes to Danforth?

Why does Elizabeth Proctor lie when questioned by Danforth about Proctor’s lechery? How are her actions ironic?

Why does Mary Warren reject the truth and condemn John Proctor?

What happens to John Proctor at the end of Act Three?

How has Reverend Hale changed over the course of this play? Why does Reverend Hale decide to quit the court?

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