Creative Writing: Hurricane Katrina

Good Essays
The disaster

The blue, sunny sky turned dull and gray very quickly in the last 5 minutes of the 17 year old, Malorey’s life. She was watching t.v and the screen went to pure static. Her sister, Lucy was in her room studying for a test that was worth half of her grade for 6th grade.

Soon, the narrator on the radio came on and informed, “Attention all New Orlean citizens, please evacuate the state in the next 15 minutes! A category 5 hurricane is coming!”

Hurricane Katrina was the 3rd strongest hurricane to ever reach the U.S. (dosomething.org). “Lucy,” Malorey yelled, “You need to pack up things you need to take with you on vacation!” She didn’t want Lucy to know that a hurricane is coming because she will have an anxiety attack..
“ Where are we going on vacation?” Lucy questioned her.

We are going to Alabama for a few days. Make sure that you put your glasses in my bag with
…show more content…
WHY DIDN’T YOU TELL ME THAT THERE IS A HURRICANE COMING!” Lucy yelled furiously.
“I didn’t want you to freak out.” Malorey replied. Lucy turned away from her and stares out the window at the no longer, blue sky.
“I think I see it coming. Is it that twisty, swirling thing in the distance?” Lucy asked.
“Uh-huh.” Malorey replied.

They finally made it to Alabama and got everything unpacked in the hotel room. They were watching the t.v the hurricane already did a lot of damage. The city flooded 80% of New Orleans (NASA.gov). It was time for them to go to bed because it took them 4 hours to drive here.
“Good night.” Lucy whispered.
“Good night.” Malorey whispered back. Malorey’s phone gave her an alert and it read, “THE CATEGORY 5 HURRICANE IMPACTED OVER 90,000 SQUARE MILES!” (dosomething.org)

It was morning and they could leave to go back home. When they got there, the entire city was destroyed and Lucy’s bright, blue eyes started to tear up. But there was a news reporter talking about has the cost of damage is $135 billion from Hurricane Katrina.

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