Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy .

Satisfactory Essays
Marissa Boltz
Kate Pickett
Abnormal Psychology 280
April 17th, 2013
CBT

CBT also known as cognitive-behavioral therapy “…helps individuals make changes not only in their overt behavior but also in their underlying thoughts, beliefs, and attitudes” (Nevid, 113). CBT helps you become aware of inaccurate or negative thinking, so you can view challenging situations more clearly and respond to them in a more effective way. It can be very useful to most people who are suffering from a mental illness such as anxiety and depression. Not only does CBT help with mental illness, it can help someone overcome stressful situations. CBT is the preferred choice of psychotherapy because it “takes fewer sessions and is a lot quicker to help someone” (Mayoclinic). The type of emotional challenges it helps are trauma, helps resolve relationship conflicts, grief, prevent a relapse, and ways to manage a medical illness. Some mental illnesses it helps treat sleep/sexual disorders, eating disorders like anorexia, schizophrenia, and even phobias. In some cases “[CBT] is most effective when combined with other treatments and medications. Cognitive-behavioral therapy is the most effective therapy when it comes to depression and anxiety. Most effective physiological treatment for severe depression and it is as effective as antidepressants. There are some problems with CBT just like any other type of therapy or method. CBT is not a quick fix, a therapist is like a personal trainer that advises and encourages - but cannot 'do ' it for you. Also “[t]o overcome anxiety, you need to confront it. This may lead you to feel more anxious for a short time” (RC Psych). Another problem with CBT is if you are feeling low, it can be difficult to concentrate and get motivated. There is empirical support stating how effective CBT is. According to “Abnormal Psychology in a Changing World”, it states that it helps the reduction of anxiety disorders in symptoms at both follow up and treatment.



Bibliography: * Nevid, Jeffrey S., Spencer A. Rathus, and Beverly Greene. "Methods of Treatment." Abnormal Psychology in a Changing World. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1997. N. pag. Print. * Royal College of Psychiatrists. "Cognitive Behavioural Therapy ." Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT). Royal College of Psychiatrists, Autumn 2013. Web. 12 Apr. 2013 * Staff, Mayo Clinic. "Definition/risks/effectiveness." Mayo Clinic. Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research, 21 Feb. 2013. Web. 12 Apr. 2013.

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