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Cell Transport and Homeostasis

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Cell Transport and Homeostasis
Cell Transport And Homeostasis

The roles of different types of cell-membrane proteins in the preservation of body organs donated for transplant is very vast. Certain cell-membrane proteins carry several different types of nutrients that are beneficial and are sometimes very important to keep organs that are to be transplanted healthy and fresh. Organic nutrients are some very good preservers. One of the most transplanted organs is the kidney. It is important that this organ has nutrients because it can dry and rot rather quickly. These nutrients transfer energy from the cell membrane and transport it to the organ to keep it preserved. If the cell membrane lacks the proper internal structure that is beneficial to the organ, then that can be very harmful in the long run. It could also change the properties and internal structure of the organ that it is located in. Another organ that is transplanted a lot is the heart. In my research, I found that hearts need to stay on ice as well as be neutralized by the nutrients in cell-membrane proteins. Without these things, as well as fast transportation, the heart can quickly harden and become useless. The proteins also need to learn how to adapt outside of their natural environment because they are not used to living in an organ that is not doing work in an organ system and body for a specific amount of time. These proteins also require oxygen that, obviously, a transplanted organ doesn't have for a certain amount of time. If these proteins do not receive that oxygen, there is no good in the proteins because they cannot do their preservation job properly. The different kinds of proteins include: Host-versus-graft reactions; Direct allorecognition Indirect allorecognition (used for all organs, especially during early post-transplant period, at any time post-transplant, and especially later on). Graft-versus-host reactions (Used for Liver, intestines, and lungs. Any organ recipient who also receives bone marrow

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