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Becoming Human

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Becoming Human
N. R. Ignacio
ANTH-171
Film #1
Becoming Human-First Steps Homosapiens are the most complex and adaptable animal on earth. How did we get this way? Our ancestry has evolved through millions of years. In Africa, a distinguishing occurrence, apes that stood on four legs started walking on two legs straight up. So now a fossil remain, a six million year old skull named Tumei could contain the secret of how human ancestry walked upright. First to speak about the significance of how humans walked up right is Michel Brunet, of College de France. He said, “We are writing the first chapter of human evolution. We are at the beginning, very close”. Here at a fossilized bone of a child from three and half millions years ago might lay the answer to this long unanswered question.
Homosapiens are the first to be alone in this category of evolution. The Afar north of east Ethiopia and part of the Rift Valley might have some critical evidence to help explain human beginning. This area is being exposed by geological forces in which is separating from Africa’s continent. Now at this point, it explores the fossil of “Selam” also known as “Lucy’s Child.” The paleoanthropologist Zeray Alemseged, California Academy of Sciences, spent eight years carefully excavating sandstone embedded fossil. He is tracing the fossil bones of our earliest humans. But fossils of our ancestor are hard to recover or find. It was a three-year old Australopithecus afarensis female whose bones were found. It was found that near white bands of volcanic ash in the landscape. Then giving it a date of three millions years ago but in geology it explains about stratification, thus in case the fossil was found above the volcanic ash which makes it younger then the volcanic ash.
Human origins are of great mystery especially to scientists. This intact skull and it having a full set of teeth showed large and pointy canines which help distinguish ape’s teeth from early humans has completely disappeared then

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