Anatomy and Physiology

Topics: Blood, Human anatomy, Kidney, Anatomy, Organ, Heart / Pages: 4 (1072 words) / Published: Sep 17th, 2014
Seminar 1 Option 2
Elizabeth Boatfield
Introduction to Anatomy and Physiology
SC121
Instructor: Eric D. Steelman, DHSc(c), MPH, MS, RLATG

A course assignment presented to Kaplan University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the SC121 curriculum
September 4, 2014

Anatomy and Physiology are studied together but differ in many ways but go hand in hand in studying the human body. Anatomy is the study of the relationships of the body structures. Anatomy was first studied by dissections of the body’s structures and the relationships the body shares with these structures. Studies of anatomy include: developmental biology, embryology, histology, gross anatomy, cell biology, systemic anatomy, surface anatomy, regional anatomy, pathological anatomy, and imaging anatomy. Physiology is the study of how the parts work and the body’s function. Physiology also has several branches of studies which are: Neurophysiology, Endocrinology, Immunology, Exercise physiology, Cardiovascular physiology, Renal physiology, Respiratory physiology, and pathophysiology. (Tortora & Derrickson, 2014) Anatomical position is the position in which the body stands erect facing the observer with the feet flat on the ground and the palms facing outward (Tortora & Derrickson, 2014). The anatomical directions are used to describe the directional parts of the body. There are several terms that describe different areas of the body. Lateral is used describe a point furthest from the midline (Tortora & Derrickson, 2014) . Proximal is used to describe a limb of the trunk (Tortora & Derrickson, 2014). Medial is an imaginary vertical line dividing the body into equal left and right sides (Tortora & Derrickson, 2014). Distal is described as the farthest attachment of a limb to the trunk of the body (Tortora & Derrickson, 2014). Other important terms include: superficial (on the surface of the body), superior (upper part of the body), inferior



References: Tortora, G. J., & Derrickson, B. (2014). Principles of Anatomy and Physiology. Hoboken: John Wiley.

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