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An Analysis Of The Epic Of Gilgamesh

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An Analysis Of The Epic Of Gilgamesh
Unit 1: Discussion on Gilgamesh I believe the motif of the Epic of Gilgamesh is Gilgamesh’s immortality. The hero of this epic, the demigod, Gilgamesh, was well gifted by the gods. He possessed the traits of beauty and strength, as was expressed in the opening paragraph of the Epic of Gilgamesh. “…The great gods made his beauty perfect, surpassing all others, terrifying like a great wild bull” (3). Gilgamesh wanted for nothing in the city of Uruk, as can be seen from the perspective of the men of Uruk when they stated, “Gilgamesh takes them all…” (4). Gilgamesh knew great friendship through Enkidu. While possessing many great traits, the one thing Gilgamesh did not possess and coveted was immortality. Gilgamesh confides to his friend

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