1984: Communism, Totalitarianism, and Socialism

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Nineteen Eighty-Four was written by a major contributor to anticommunist literature around the World War II period, and is one of the greatest stories of an anti-utopian society ever. Nineteen Eighty-Four was not written solely as an entertaining piece of literature or as a dream of what the future could be like, it was written as a warning of what could happen as a result of communism and totalitarianism. This was not necessarily a widely popular vision of the future at the time of publication, but it was certainly considered a possibility by many people. The popular vision of the future, if analyzed as from a character in the book's point of view, sometimes changes, depending on the character. The mass of people, the proletarians, have a single vision of what the future is. However, Winston, and others who have had the same experience as him, have a different view of the future after leaving the Ministry of Love. Their were many different visions of the future at the time when Nineteen Eighty-Four was written. Some people believed that the world superpowers would conquer the weak nations of the world and democracy would rule everything. Some believed that the world would stay as it was in 1948, as many individual nations, and somewhere in the future we would drive cars through the air and live on the moon. Others feared that communism, totalitarianism, and socialism would spread throughout the world, and that everyone would suffer under these undesirable economic and political structures. It was on this basis that Nineteen Eighty-Four was written. George Orwell's idea of a totalitarian society is frighteningly realistic, and could easily have been construed as a possibility of what the world might have been like in 1984. In the 19th century many different visions of the future have entertained our society, been marketed, and teased the minds of millions. Television shows such as the Jetsons and countless movies like Star Wars, Logan's Run, Back to the Future, and

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