United States Bill of Rights Essays & Research Papers

Best United States Bill of Rights Essays

  • United States Bill of Rights and American Sporting Tradition
    Gun Control Gun control would not help crime or murder rates because instead it disarms the law abiding citizens, therefore putting them at a disadvantage in defending there selves against criminals. The second amendment states that citizens have the right to bear arms. Guns have also been an American sporting tradition for years, and have saved many lives from rapist, murders and innocent civilians from the hands of criminals. The second amendment is part of the constitution and is...
    642 Words | 2 Pages
  • Bill Of Rights - 353 Words
    The Bill of Rights The First 10 Amendments • By Keana Roby, James Jamison, Amber Fealy, & Paige Evans. 1st Amendment • The 1st Amendment guarantees freedom of religion, speech, the press, assembly, and petition. • This means that we have the right to – • Practice any religion desired • Speak freely • Assemble (such as social gatherings/meetings) • Petition (address the government, hold protests, etc. • Press (to publish newspapers, TV, radio, Internet 2nd Amendment • The...
    353 Words | 6 Pages
  • Bill of Rights - 766 Words
    The bill of rights helped shape the way America is today. The bill of rights was the first ten amendments to the constitution, in order to prevent misconstruction or abuse of its powers they were added and we were given the rights we have today. The first amendment to the constitution is one of the most important amendments to the constitution. The first part of the constitution has to do with the freedom of religion. This freedom is greatly argued and constantly debated by many people I the...
    766 Words | 2 Pages
  • Bill of Rights - 1541 Words
    Bill of Rights & Amendments The Constitution of the United States was written by our forefathers to set up guidelines and regulations for the government to follow as well as give certain rights to the citizens of this nation. “In the past 200 years, the U.S. Constitution has been amended 27 times” (How the U.S. Constitution, n.d.). “On September 25, 1789, the First Congress of the United States therefore proposed to the state legislatures 12 amendments to the Constitution that met arguments...
    1,541 Words | 4 Pages
  • All United States Bill of Rights Essays

  • Bill of Rights - 2749 Words
    Bill of Rights Paper University of Phoenix HIS/311 Introduction The first 10 Amendments to the US Constitution are known as the Bill of Rights. The Fifth Amendment relates to legal procedure. One of the clauses contained within this Amendment concerns the subject of double jeopardy. Our learning team selected double jeopardy as our area of focus. This document offers an analysis of the Founding Father's intent in providing the double jeopardy clause, a discussion of how double jeopardy...
    2,749 Words | 7 Pages
  • The Bill of Rights - 339 Words
    The Bill of Rights Bill of Rights The first ten amendments to the US constitution are called the Bill of Rights because they provide basic legal protection for individual rights. The terms also applied to the English Bill of Rights of 1689 and the Canadian Bill of Rights 1960, and to similar guarantees in the constitutions of the American states. From the perspective of two centuries, it can be said that Madison chose well among they pyramid of proposal sin the state. he...
    339 Words | 2 Pages
  • Bill of Rights - 438 Words
    Author; Ted Yanak and Pam Comelison / Article; The Great American History Fact-Finder Jan 12, 2011 Bill of Rights The topic I chose for my essay was Bill of Rights. My research was done on one of two articles I researched. The article “The American Fact-Finders”, by Ted Yanak and Pam Comelison is an informational article. This article on the U.S. Constitution, explains the purpose and intentions for the creations of the Bill of Rights. The Bill of Rights is the first 10...
    438 Words | 2 Pages
  • Bill of Rights - 365 Words
    How the Bill of Rights Affects My Life The Bill of Rights was ratified over two hundred years ago, but yet still affects every American to this day. The Bill of Rights is named for the first ten amendments of the United States. It is used as the base for our rights as Americans and isn't being changed anytime soon. The Bill of Rights was founded by our founding fathers and since then, more amendments have been added. The first amendment gives the freedom of speech, religion, and...
    365 Words | 1 Page
  • bill of rights - 1108 Words
    Bill of Rights A brief history on how the Bill of Rights came forth. Back in the late 1700’s, several states were called for a constitution to protect individual’s rights from the government. Through these calls, James Madison came forth and put together the Amendments, which was later signed in 1791(1). What started off as 17 Amendments was trimmed down to 10 main one’s which is where we stand now with the Bill of Rights. There are several key Amendments that tie into criminal law. Those...
    1,108 Words | 3 Pages
  • Bill of Rights - 1836 Words
    BILL OF RIGHTS Bill of Rights LaToya Davenport Kaplan University CJ500 Dr. Ron Wallace June 04, 2013 Throughout United States history, there have been many changes to the laws society lives by today. There is a process to which laws are made and each amendment undergoes that specific process. Once that process is completed, the end result is what is now known as the United States Constitution. Inside that Constitution is the Bill of Rights which is used as a symbol to mold the...
    1,836 Words | 5 Pages
  • Bill Rights - 743 Words
    The Theory that the Fourteenth Amendment incorporates the Bill of Rights established the foundation for the Warren Court’s criminal procedure revolution. The U.S. Supreme Court has incorporated many of the protections and prohibitions in the Bill of Rights. These protections are available to criminal offenders. In this paper, I will discuss which protections do not apply to the states. And the differences between the two laws: procedural and substantive. As you continue on reading, you know...
    743 Words | 2 Pages
  • Bill of Rights - 471 Words
     Derek Matthew Gonzales Per 5 Bill of Rights What is the purpose of the Bill of Rights? The purpose of it is to save the Anti-Federalists because from the beginning, they thought that the Constitution favored a central government too heavily. They did not agree that the balance of power provided for by the Constitution prevented one branch from becoming too powerful. They were scared that the Congress and the court system were too far removed from the people of...
    471 Words | 2 Pages
  • Bill of Rights Vs Human Rights
    Kurtis Mendonca Anthropology 4Writing Assignment #109/09/14 Universal Declaration of Human Rights Versus United States Constitution Human rights are inalienable which means “unable to be taken away from or given away by the possessor:” freedom of religion, is the most inalienable of all human rights. There are two documents in the United States that could not have been more beautifully written. The first document, The Declaration of Independence, which is a Declaration of War. The second...
    1,389 Words | 4 Pages
  • Bill Of Rights Of The Constitution Paper1
     Bill of Rights of the Constitution HIS/110 Bill of Rights of the Constitution The Constitution, which establishes the powers and structures of the three branches of government, is very significant. More though is the Ten Amendments known as the Bill of Rights. These amendments focus on our basic rights as citizens and are the standing ground for the Constitution. In this paper, I will share the views of four individuals from Team B. Our rankings will vary depending on each person’s...
    936 Words | 3 Pages
  • Intent of the Framers of the Bill of Rights
    The Framers Intent Paper HIS/311 January 1, 2013 Introduction The first 10 amendments of the United States Constitution are the Bill of Rights. They were written to protect the rights of American People. The amendments represent important ideas that affect everyone on a daily basis. The first amendment involves freedom of religion, speech, assembly, and the press. The original intent of for freedom of speech, along with current views, events, opinions, an evaluation of the...
    911 Words | 3 Pages
  • Justify the Bill of Rights - 1876 Words
    Assignment 1: Justifying the Bill of Rights Kymberli Morse LEG107 November 3, 2012 Attorney Charlene Bean Assignment 1: Justifying the Bill of Rights The amendments are an important part of the U.S. Constitution because the Bill of Rights has a remarkable effect on all Americans in our everyday lives and in our legal system. Therefore, I feel the 10th Amendment which refers to powers not given to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved...
    1,876 Words | 5 Pages
  • The 1st Amendment; the Bill of Rights
    The First Amendment "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances." -- Amendment One, Bill of Rights, United States Constitution Perhaps the most well known of all the amendments to the Constitution, the First Amendment contains many of the fundamental freedoms that...
    519 Words | 2 Pages
  • Essay 2 Bill Of Rights
    Emily Macoul Stephen Russell American Government March 12, 2015 Alternative Essay: Bill of Rights The Bill of Rights is used in our everyday lives. It gives a person with no criminal background and a person with criminal background rights. When we wake up in the morning we use examples of the Bill of Rights. We have the power to decide what we are going to do on a particular day. We have the power to practice a religion or not. We also have the power to assemble in peace every day or not. In...
    954 Words | 3 Pages
  • Bill of Rights Paper - 1
    Bill of Rights Paper The Bill of Rights is the name that was given to the first ten amendments of the Constitution of the United States. The Bill of Rights focuses on the set limitations of the government, which included preventing abuse against citizenry by government officials. Although, the document does not cover all rights of citizens in American one can view that it does list the key important rights defined by the Founding Fathers. One will identify all ten Bill of Rights listed in the...
    1,771 Words | 5 Pages
  • Bill Of Rights Paper - 972 Words
    Daniel Broskey 112864743 2/9/15 CCJS230 Bill of Rights Paper After the Declaration of Independence, Congress drafted the Constitution. This document explained how the new government would be formed with three separate branches. It also included explanations of the duties of each branch, and how each branch was designed to keep the others from becoming too powerful, a system know as checks and balances. However, some people thought that even with this system of checks and balances, the...
    972 Words | 3 Pages
  • My Life on The Bill of Rights
    My Life on The Bill of Rights It started out with a meeting full of representatives that was held by James Madison. On December 15, 1791, ten amendments were ratified and added to the Constitution. Those are the amendments that gave each person equal rights. We call them The Bill of Rights. The most important amendment to the Constitution gave residents in America the freedom of speech, religion, press, assembly, and petition; which are protected by the first amendment. The fifth amendment...
    347 Words | 1 Page
  • Origin of the Bill of Rights - 5052 Words
    The Other Founders: A Study of the Origin of the Bill of Rights and the Antifederalist Contribution to Formulation, Development and Adoption What role did the Antifederalists have in the founding of America? It is a well-known theory that the Antifederalists contribution to the founding is the addition of the Bill of Rights. However, James Madison is often referred to as the father of the Bill of Rights and it is often argued that the Bill of Rights did not accomplish the goals of the...
    5,052 Words | 14 Pages
  • GOVT 2306 Bill of Rights
    The Bill of Rights Instructions: The Bill of Rights is first ten amendments to the Constitution of the United States. Commonly and collectively, these are referred to as your civil liberties – your constitutional legal protections against actions of the government. In the space provided below, please put the Bill of Rights into your own words (one or two complete sentences each). Please note that this assignment is not about right or wrong, but how you understand the meaning of the first ten...
    874 Words | 3 Pages
  • Business and the Bill of Rights - 1053 Words
    Business and The Bill of Rights Cheryl Anderson BUS 220 Prof. T. Daniel. Browning Pima Community College March 5, 2013 “I plead the 5th!” That phrase is heard from the mouths of children as well as adults. It has become a cliché. Children learn early in life what the phrase means and how and when to use it. They use it as a tool to keep themselves out of trouble or to keep from having to tattle on a sibling or friend. As children advance in their education, they study...
    1,053 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Impact of the Bill of Rights - 1859 Words
    Shelby Thomas Mrs. Horn English 11 May 21, 2013 The Impact of the Bill of Rights The Bill of Rights is a memorial and milestone in the never ending struggle of men to recapture and uphold liberty and dignity. The need of a stronger government was the cause of the creation of the Constitution of the United States. “The Constitution established not merely a league of states, but a government that exercised its authority directly over all citizens.” (Almanac of Policy Issues) The...
    1,859 Words | 5 Pages
  • The Bill of Rights Importance and Freedom
    The bill of rights was important because it guaranteed rights for the people which made it easily excepted. the bill of rights started the amendments to the constitution which likely resulted in some of the other amendments getting added in. i cant really say it has a big impact on my life, because for a i can tell it doesnt. i mean most of the amendments of the bill of rights are not used seriously much today. the first amendment guarantees the freedoms of religion, assembly, petition, press,...
    274 Words | 1 Page
  • Bill Of Rights Essay - 330 Words
    Bill of Rights Essay. The Billl of Rights are stated in the first ten amendments. This bill contains the rights of; freedom of religion, freedom of speech, freedom of assembly, freedom of petition, right to be protected from unreasonable searches and seizures, right to bear arms, right to not give housing to soldiers during peace time, freedom of the press, freedom to equal justice, and the right to freedom and security. These rights are used daily, because or their impact on american living....
    330 Words | 1 Page
  • United States v Salerno
    Case Study: United States v. Salerno 481 U.S. 739 (1987) Using your text and the internet, in narrative format with a minimum of 500 words, outline the case of United States v. Salerno, 481 U.S. 739 (1987). Give the facts, issue, and court holding of the case. In the case of United States v. Salerno, Anthony “Fat Tony” Salerno was arrested on charges of numerous RICO violations, and detained without bail. This case determined that the Bail Reform Act of 1984 did not violated the Due Process...
    1,109 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Necessity of the Bill of Rights - 532 Words
    The side I take in this debate would be on how to prove how immensely important the Bill of Rights really is. "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances" is the most significant amendment of the ten amendments to the public. The Bill of Rights makes the country what...
    532 Words | 2 Pages
  • Bill of Rights Assignment - 1041 Words
    I started my assignment by really reading over the Bill of Rights and thinking really hard. It occurred to me that this was going to be a very tough assignment. Though I don’t think that a lot of the Amendments are upheld much anymore, such as freedom of speech, I could not think of any that needed to be removed or changed. So I started thinking about things that I thought should be added. It came to my attention that I shouldn’t try of think of things that should be added because of personal...
    1,041 Words | 3 Pages
  • The United States Declaration of Independence
    ABSOLUTION The Declaration of Independence and Constitution of The United States of America The United States Declaration of Independence The Declaration of Independence was approved on July 4, 1776 by members of the Second Continental Congress in Independence Hall (then known as the Pennsylvania State House) in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania as a means to cut ties and governance with mother England. Unbeknownst at the time, it also lay the philosophical basis to the United States...
    1,214 Words | 4 Pages
  • Amendments of the United States Constitution
    Understanding the amendments of the United States Constitution is important because it explains our rights and duties as citizens. They are also important because having knowledge of the first ten amendments, if need be, can be used as an example in court. It strengthens the government and helps people to not be controlled by other people, for example a king or queen; so, independence is given as well to the people under the government in the United States. Appreciate your rights! The...
    1,251 Words | 3 Pages
  • Bill of Rights to Protect from Tyranny
    After the Constitution was written, the new born nation was immediately split into two political sides, the federalists and the anti-federalists, over the ratification. Federalists, southern planters or people that tended to hold interest in trade, advocated a strong executive. On the other hand, anti-federalists, back country people or people involved in business but not in the mercantile economy, opposed the ratification of the constitution. The two sides, after much debate, were able to...
    769 Words | 3 Pages
  • Bill of rights vs. Canadian charter.
    It is in this vein that a country drafts legislation to protect the rights of their inhabitants. In the United States there is the Bill of Rights of 1781, which consists of a preamble and the first ten amendments to the United States Constitution, 1787. In Canada there is the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, which is the first part of the Canadian Constitution Act, 1982. Both of these documents provide for the rights and freedoms for their respective populations. These documents are vastly...
    3,046 Words | 8 Pages
  • Nevada Constitution vs the Bill of Rights
    The Nevada Constitution versus The Bill of Rights Ratified in 1791 by three-fourths of the states, the Bill of Right is made of ten amendments to the United Stated Constitution. Approved by voters of the Territory of Nevada, the Nevada Constitution was approved in September of 1864. The First Amendment of the Bill of Rights discusses freedom of speech, press, religion, assembly, and right to petition. Article One of the Nevada Constitution contains the declaration of rights. These...
    557 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Magna Carta's Influence on the Bill of Rights
    How The Magna Carta Influenced The Bill of Rights In 1215, the Magna Carta was created to limit the monarch’s powers and for all the freemen in England to keep their rights. In 1788, the Bill of Rights was created, also to limit the power of the government, and for all citizens to keep their rights. They both discuss basic rights. It’s said that the Magna Carta is one of the most important legal documents in all of democracy’s history. At the time, the government and way of rule wasn’t the way...
    649 Words | 2 Pages
  • What the Bill of Rights Means to Me
    What does the Bill of Rights mean to me? The Bill of Rights is the first ten amendments of the Constitution. It has different meanings for everyone. It means many different things to me today. The Bill of Rights affects me in many different ways such as what I believe, what I say, and what other freedoms I have. The first amendment affects me in many different ways in every day life. It talks about freedom of press, speech and religion. This amendment is one of the most important to me....
    493 Words | 2 Pages
  • Lesson Plan: Classroom Bill of Rights
    Bill of Rights Lesson Plan Overview Introduction This document contains the lesson plan for a Classroom Bill of Rights. It allows the student to practice Application -- applying information on the US Bill of Rights to the creation of a Classroom Bill of Rights. This document contains the lesson plan as well as the handouts and form noted in the lesson. The videos referred to and used in this lesson were obtained from the Mansfield Public Library and are as follows:  United States...
    2,053 Words | 0 Page
  • The Eighth Amendment to the United States Constitution
    8th Amendment The Eighth Amendment to the United States Constitution is part of the United States Bill of Rights which took effect in 1791. The amendment prohibits the federal government from imposing excessive bail, excessive fines, and cruel and unusual punishments (Wikipedia). This amendment was ratified as part of the United States Bill of Rights in 1791. This amendment actually started in England in 1689 by King William III. Virginia had adopted the language of the English Bill of Rights...
    356 Words | 1 Page
  • Magna Carta v. Bill of Rights
     Seriously, can you imagine what the United States would be like if we didn’t have a democracy? Without the Magna Carta or Bill of Rights the U.S would be hectic because the federal government would have more power and they would be able to do things unfairly. The Magna Carta influenced our most cherished document the Bill of Rights in two noble ways; individual freedom, and by restricting the power of the government. One belief that although, the Magna Carta and Bill of Rights were two...
    433 Words | 2 Pages
  • Ten Amendments: United States Constitution
    Amendment There are Ten Amendments ratified to the United States Constitution. These amendments are called and known as the “Bill of Rights”. The first amendment in the Bill of Rights talks about how the freedom of establish of religion, freedom of press, freedom of assembly right to petition, freedom of speech. They all have to do with people talking free in the United States and doing what they can with this amendment. The first part talks about the freedom of religion. In these case the...
    584 Words | 2 Pages
  • AN example where the bill of rights have been violated!
    Summary Since September 11, 2001 the fear of terrorism has eroded the rights and liberties that define American society. There have been egregious violations of Constitutional rights and international law related to the government response to the attacks of one year ago. The Executive branch of the Constitution has taken control of the whole situation regarding the war on terror by using the Executive Orders and not compromising with the other two branches resulting in seriously compromised...
    462 Words | 2 Pages
  • A comparison of US Bill of Rights and The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms
    Former United States Attorney General Ramsey Clark wrote in the New York Times, "A right is not what someone gives you; but what no one can take away." It is in this vein that a country drafts legislation to protect the rights of their inhabitants. In the United States there is the Bill of Rights, which consists of a preamble and the first ten amendments to the United States Constitution, 1787 . The Charter of Rights and Freedoms is the first part of the Canadian Constitution Act, 1982 . Both of...
    1,875 Words | 6 Pages
  • Compasrion between the Bill of Rights and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights
    The Bill of Rights and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights are two vital documents dedicated to the safety, security, and overall well-being of two very different groups of people. The Bill of Rights was simply the first ten amendments of the United States Constitution, whereas the Universal Declaration of Human Rights was made for all of the people governed by the separate and independent nations included in the United Nations. The key difference in the documents rests not in the words,...
    780 Words | 3 Pages
  • How the Bill of Rights Affects My Life
    How the Bill of Rights Affects My Life In 1791, the first ten amendments to the Constitution of the United States, also known as the Bill of Rights, become ratified. The Bill of Rights contained freedoms that Americans held to be their inalienable rights, and were so important that before ratifying the Constitution many states insisted on a promise of amendments guaranteeing individual rights. It was created to set limitations on the power of the United States government, protecting the...
    456 Words | 2 Pages
  • First Amendment Is the Cornerstone of the United States of America
    First Amendment is the Cornerstone of the United States of America On July 4, 1776 the Declaration of Independence was signed freeing the thirteen American colonies from Great Britain, creating what would become the most powerful democratic country in history. The United States of America’s path to success is filled with trial, error, and countless sacrifices. The founding fathers envisioned a nation that was governed by the people not by a tyrannical king. On December 15, 1791 a...
    1,071 Words | 3 Pages
  • United States Constitution and Dwight Dexter Case
    Stephen Cen Amer Democ 6th period In The Supreme Court of the United States Dexter (Petitioner) v. Michigan State Prosecutor (Respondent) On Writ of Certiorari To the Supreme Court of the United States BRIEF AMICUS CURIAE OF THE Criminal Bar Association In Support of Petitioner Dwight Dexter’s rights were not upheld in criminal justice system. Sheriff Dodd had searched Dwight’s car without a warrant or consent, violating Dwight's protection from search...
    556 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Bill of Rights: The First Ten Amendments to the U.S. Constitution
    Sadiona Gremaj The Bill of Rights refers to the US Bill of Rights, the first ten amendments to the U.S. Constitution. Proposed in 1789, the amendments aim to limit the power of the federal government by protecting free speech, freedom of religion, the right to a fair trial, and other rights. The First Amendment is perhaps the most important part of the Bill of Rights. It protects five of the most basic liberties. They are freedom of religion, freedom of speech, freedom of the press,...
    271 Words | 1 Page
  • The United States Constitution and How It Serves the Nation
    The United States Constitution is the frame that holds the individual states together. It is the most amazing political document ever written and has lasted for more than 200 years. Even though there were provisions for change written into it, the Constitution has been a role model for almost every country that desires to have a firm Democratic system based on the rule of law. The United States Constitution is a healthy document which still serves our nation exceptionally well and does not need...
    531 Words | 2 Pages
  • Rights of Accused - 693 Words
    Rights of Accused. Medina. 1 Rights of Accused Mawar Medina Dr. S.G. Harb POL 110 – U.S. Government 4/27/12 Rights of Accused. Medina. 2 Criteria # 1 On Merriam-Webster Dictionary, Due Process is defined as a judicial requirement stating that enacted laws may not contain provisions that result in the unfair, arbitrary, or unreasonable treatment of an individual. In all its complexity due process just simply means the rights of any citizen to...
    693 Words | 3 Pages
  • Rights and Freedoms - 806 Words
    Michelle Sondgeroth POS-301 5-13-13 Mark Tawney Right and Freedoms Assignment The amendments are constantly being changed and altered to accommodate for the changing being made in the nation today. The founders established that the Constitution change as needed to meet needs of the country, but only if the changes had proper meaning. The amendments added to the Constitution have to meet certain rights for Americans and provide clarification for the original Article V. Over the years...
    806 Words | 3 Pages
  • Rights And Freedom - 960 Words
    Xavier Kee 10/ 23/14 POS-301 Instructor: Jennifer Biddle Rights and Freedom In this paper I will discuss about which freedom that guaranteed me in the First amendment to the Constitution. I will also discuss about the significance of the Bill of Rights, and the process for amending the constitution. The amendment which guaranteed freedom to me in the First Amendment to the Constitution personally is the Amendment 1. Amendment 1 states that I am guaranteed my right of freedom of speech, press,...
    960 Words | 3 Pages
  • Rights and Freedoms - 1140 Words
    Eric Gaspard February 26, 2012 POS-301 Grand Canyon University Professor Amanda Froes   RIGHTS AND FREEDOMS Eric Gaspard   The Bill of Rights is composed of the first ten amendments to the Constitution of the United States. Amendments can become a part of the Constitution by one of two ways. These are spelled out in Article V of the Constitution. To propose an Amendment both the U.S. Senate and the House of Representatives must approve the proposal by a two-thirds...
    1,140 Words | 4 Pages
  • Inmate Rights - 876 Words
    Kristen Paul Week 7 December 1, 2012 The Rights that Inmates Possess Upon entering prison, inmates will lose most of their right as a free citizen. Although most of our rights afforded to us are a result of how we live our lives here in the United States, some of our rights still are maintained within the prison walls. These rights are listed within the First, Fourth, Eighth, and Fourteenth Amendment. The First amendment states we have the right to freedom of speech, press, and...
    876 Words | 3 Pages
  • Procedural Rights - 2390 Words
    "The history of liberty has largely been the history of observance of procedural safeguards." We agree with this quote because our country is based on the right to have our guaranteed protection of life, liberty and property. Two of the greatest procedural guarantees that insure liberty are the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments. According to the Fifth Amendment, a capital crime is punishable by death, while an infamous crime is punishable by death or imprisonment. This amendment guarantees that no...
    2,390 Words | 6 Pages
  • Right of Privacy - 942 Words
    The Right of Privacy is one of the broadest yet most controversial rights we have, but it is not specifically in the U.S. constitution. There are however, a few Amendments that are the key to defining the right of privacy with the most important consisting of the 1st, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 9th and the 14th. Cases taken to the Supreme Court are also a substantial part of the Right of Privacy in a more specific way in which the highest courts of the United States decide upon the most controversial cases....
    942 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Right to Counsel - 1551 Words
    The Right to Counsel Lori Cierkowski CJA/364 April 30, 2012 Carl Schiff The Right to Counsel The Constitution of the United States and the Bill of Rights grant citizens privileges that can be interpreted in different ways, the right to counsel being one of them. The right to counsel is contained in the 6th and 14th Amendments of the United States Constitution while the 5th Amendment gives way to avoidance of self-incrimination. It holds the same meaning but stated...
    1,551 Words | 5 Pages
  • Gun Rights - 311 Words
    The topic for my multi genre research project is gun rights. More importantly, my question is; Are American citizens justified to own and use firearms? The answer to my question is yes, we are indeed justified to own and use firearms under the rights of the constitution. For you to know how to answer my question as un biased as possible you need to know what the second amendment states. “A well regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep...
    311 Words | 1 Page
  • The Bill of Rightd, Then and Now
    The Bill of Rights, Then and Now By Veronica Majerol This article is an information piece talking about the difference between the Bill of Rights in 1791, and the Bill of Rights today. In this article the author talks about the first 10 amendments to the Constitution and the debates that are still stirring almost 220 years later. John Adams called the Constitution “the greatest single effort of national deliberation that the world has ever seen.” Many other people thought that...
    368 Words | 2 Pages
  • Amendments in the United Sates - 705 Words
    Amendments in the United Sates constitution have changed our government and our society. Amendments are usually ratified due to social events that occur over time .Ideologies also pay a considerable role to the ratification process as well. If it wasn't for political groups such as The Anti-Feudalist we may not have obtained the 1st amendment which sates "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of...
    705 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Right to Privacy by Robert Bork.
    The Right to Privacy by Robert Bork. Robert Bork's The Right of Privacy examined the landmark case Griswald v. Conneticut. Bork's "originalist" view proclaimed that Justice Douglas erroneously interpreted the right of privacy from the Constitution. The originalist view is that judges must strictly adhere to the language of the Constitution, thus people do not have a general right to privacy because it was never actually written into the Constitution. This view severely restricts judges in...
    890 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Traditional Rights of Englishmen - 538 Words
    The influences of the traditional rights of Englishmen are visible in the United States Constitution. Under the United States Constitution, lie the rights of the legislative bodies and the rights of individual. By comparing the United States Constitution, to the traditional rights of Englishmen, evidence emerges supporting the influence of English laws in development of the United States Constitution. For example, the United States Constitution establishes the legislative powers of the...
    538 Words | 2 Pages
  • Us Constitution and the Right to Privacy
    The US constitution does not contain a specific right to privacy but the Bill of Rights does imply it. The ninth amendment of the Bill of Rights reads “the bill of rights shall not be construed to deny or disparage other rights retained by the people”. This amendment states that the rights of the people that are not specifically named are still equally important as the ones that are. Since the constitution does not give the government the right to violate privacy, it is said to be the same...
    1,489 Words | 3 Pages
  • Citizens Rights and Responsibilities - 1186 Words
    Rights and Responsibilities of Citizens In today’s society, the responsibilities of the citizens are to know their rights. Citizens are expected to; understand the rules that our government has presented to us, abide by these rules for our own well being and freedom, and serve our communities and government back. In 1789, the Constitution of the United States was ratified. Many people were not pleased with this constitution; they felt as though it did not protect their rights to the fullest...
    1,186 Words | 4 Pages
  • Rights Guaranteed to Criminal Defendants
    The Framers of the Constitution recalled a time when the government accused people of crimes they did not commit and then convicted them in one-sided trials. Subsequently, these men put in great effort to guarantee that the new government would not engage in such practices. The Constitution and the Bill of Rights guarantee a series of important securities for persons accused of committing crimes in the US. The Sixth Amendment provides many protections and rights to a person suspected or...
    272 Words | 1 Page
  • The Right to Bear Arms - 1266 Words
    The Right to Bear Arms Introduction The Second Amendment to the United States Constitution reads, "A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed." ("Second Amendment to the United States Constitution"). Today, the interpretation of the amendment has polarized the American people among two different views (Greenslade, 2004). Those opposed to private ownership of firearms agrue that there...
    1,266 Words | 4 Pages
  • Individual Rights And Freedoms - 957 Words
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