Tropical cyclone Essays & Research Papers

Best Tropical cyclone Essays

  • Tropical Cyclone - 586 Words
    TROPICAL CYCLONES IN AUSTRALI A Tropical cyclone is one of the most common natural hazards in Australia. It’s also called ‘typhoon’, ‘hurricane’, ‘tropic storm’ and so on. If you look at the climatological data for tropical cyclone, you can find out that the actual shape of a tropical cyclone is almost the same as a whirlpool. How could this amazing phenomenon happen? There’re several conditions needed to develop a tropical cyclone. Tropical cyclones are formed above the...
    586 Words | 2 Pages
  • Tropical Cyclone - 5913 Words
    Cyclone 1. What is cyclone 2. Killer Cyclones 3. Cyclone Risk Mitigation and Preparedness Framework 4. Risk Mapping, Assessment and Analysis 5. Structural and Non Structural Mitigation 6. Sea Wall and Embankments 7. Bio-Shields 8. Cyclone Shelter 9. Cyclone Resistant Housing & Infrastructure 10. Early Warning and Communication 11. Community Based Disaster Preparedness 12. Risk Transfer and Risk Financing 13. Capacity Development and Training 14. Awareness and Education 15. Contingency Plans...
    5,913 Words | 17 Pages
  • Tropical cyclones - 1452 Words
    Tropical Cyclones Description of Tropical Cyclones A tropical cyclone is a particular type of low pressure system that occurs in the summer months near northern Australia and composes over warm tropical waters. Cyclones can also be defined as gale force winds and heftily ponderous rain that can be highly destructive. Cyclones can cause the moving and reshaping of sand dunes, whilst also generating extensive erosion along the coast. They additionally create flooding, damage inland and...
    1,452 Words | 5 Pages
  • Tropical Cyclones - 2075 Words
    Geography Natural hazards: tropical cyclones Year 9 assessment task 3 Sam borron Year 9 Mr Hine Tropical cyclone Larry Geographical processes associated with tropical cyclones Tropical cyclones form over warm oceans (above 26.5˚ C) as low pressure systems and gradually build up intensity. They have clockwise wind circulations and produce gale force winds. These winds can extend hundreds of kilometers from the cyclone center Tropical cyclones can persist for many days...
    2,075 Words | 7 Pages
  • All Tropical cyclone Essays

  • Tropical Cyclones in Australia - 943 Words
    Location: Tropical cyclones occur in the northern part of Australia, around the periphery, or in the tropics. The areas most affected by tropical cyclones are Queensland and Western Australia, with New South Wales being one of the states rarely affected. The season for tropical cyclones in the southern hemisphere is from November to April. What is a tropical cyclone: Tropical cyclones are a type of low-pressure systems which generally form in the tropics. They are violent storms, which rotate...
    943 Words | 3 Pages
  • Tropical Cyclone and U.s. the Hurricane
    Hurricane Katrina To be considered Hurricane Katrina could be the most powerful and deadly hurricane to form and land in the United States to this day. When formed, Katrina was a Category 5 hurricane, but when landed, it became a Category 4 hurricane. This released some of the tension, but not much. Hurricane Katrina contained 175 mile per hour winds causing massive pressure and destruction. Most of eastern North America began to take safety cautions. The White House and government began to...
    433 Words | 2 Pages
  • Tropical Cyclones & Floods & Droughts
    Tropical Cyclones & Floods & Droughts: Australia is well known for it's natural disasters including BushFires, Floods, Droughts and Tropical Cyclones. The major disasters being Tropical Cyclones and Droughts. A cyclone is a large-scale, atmospheric wind and pressure system characterized by low pressure at it's centre and by circulating motion, counterclockwise in the Northern Hemisphere and clockwise in the Southern Hemisphere. An example of a tropical cyclone is Australia's deadliest one...
    827 Words | 3 Pages
  • Formation of a Tropical Cyclone - 351 Words
    A tropical cyclone is a rapidly-rotating storm system characterized by a low-pressure center, strong winds, and a spiral arrangement of thunderstorms that produce heavy rain. Tropical cyclones typically form over large bodies of relatively warm water. They derive their energy from the evaporation of water from the ocean surface, which ultimately recondenses into clouds and rain when moist air rises and cools to saturation. This energy source differs from that of mid-latitude cyclonic storms,...
    351 Words | 1 Page
  • An essay on tropical cyclones - 798 Words
    A tropical cyclone is a particular type of lowpressure system. It is called a hurricane in theUnited States and a typhoon in Asia. Tropicalcyclones are areas of warm, moist air risingrapidly. The upward ¯ow of air is de¯ected by theCoriolis effect (winds de¯ected by the Earth'srotation), creating a rotation around a centralcore, known as the `eye'. Tropical cyclones areoften accompanied by very strong winds (gusts ofover 300 kilometres per hour have been recorded),torrential rain (1800...
    798 Words | 3 Pages
  • Tropical Cyclone and Small Circles
    An essay on cyclone A cyclone is a very violent storm. It never comes alone. Heavy showers of rain, thunder and lightning are its companions. When a cyclone blows, it moves round and round in the form of small circles. It always changes its course when it blows. It does not move in the same direction like an ordinary storm. It occurs mostly in the warm parts of the world. India is in this region of the world. Hence cyclones often blow over her. In cold countries there is no cyclone. The signs...
    362 Words | 1 Page
  • Questions on Tropical Cyclone - 3023 Words
    Uzair Hartley Grade: 12 C Geography assignment Tropical cyclone Mrs Reynard Uzair Hartley Grade: 12 C Geography assignment Tropical cyclone Mrs Reynard CONTENTS Pg. WHAT IS A TROPICAL CYCLONE? 3 HOW NAMES ARE GIVEN TO DIFFERENT TROPICAL CYCLONES 3 FORMATION OF A TROPICAL CYCLONE:...
    3,023 Words | 9 Pages
  • Tropical Cyclone and Galveston Tribune Galveston
    john banks US History 1302 Mr. Owens 1. A. The title of the book I chose is Isaac’s Storm: A Man, a Time, and the Deadliest Hurricane in History B. The author of this novel is Erik Larson C. This book was first published in 1945 by The Pelican Publishing Company D. This book is about the horrible hurricane of September 8, 1900 on Galveston Texas that destroyed the entire city. The story is written through the eyes of a local meteorologist named Isaac Cline who studies everything...
    2,260 Words | 6 Pages
  • Exam: Tropical Cyclone and Atmospheric Pressure
    You exam will have 60 multiple choice questions worth 1 pt each and 4 essay questions worth 10 points each for a total of 100 points. Review Exam 2 Underlined= possible essay questions. Chapter 5 1. In a pressure gradients winds will move winds from ____ pressure to ____pressure. 2. Know the movements for a cyclone and anticyclone in both hemispheres. 3. What is atmospheric pressure? 4. What device is used to measure atmospheric pressure? 5. What is the relationship...
    945 Words | 3 Pages
  • Tropical Cyclone and Scale Hurricane Structure
    Objectives At the end of this lesson students should be able to: • Define the term “hurricane” • List three categories of a hurricane. • Tell how a hurricane is formed • State how a hurricane is measured and name a scale which is used. • Define the structure of a hurricane • Explain the effects and impacts on the environment and the society. Definition A Hurricane is a severe storm...
    1,428 Words | 5 Pages
  • CYCLONE - 1764 Words
     AIR POLLUTION CONTROL TECHNOLOGY (CEB 30403) TITLE OF EXPERIMENT PARTICULATE EMISSION CONTROL BY DOUBLE CYCLONE SYSTEM NAME : THEYVAN A/L GANESAN ID : 55201212141 LECTURER : DR. AMELIA DATE OF EXPERIMENT : 9 MARCH 2015 1.0 INTRODUCTION This experiment was conducted to study the effect of cyclone body diameter upon collection efficiency. The cyclonic separator is an important and popular type of dust-removal equipment. In this experiment 50 gram of kaolin was used as sample...
    1,764 Words | 8 Pages
  • A reaction paper for the article: TROPICAL CYCLONES ‘LIKELY TO INTENSIFY’
    A reaction paper for the article: TROPICAL CYCLONES ‘LIKELY TO INTENSIFY’ According to the article, Tropical cyclones hitting East Asia have grown increasingly fierce in the past 30 years and are likely to intensify further with global warming. Noticeable increases of greenhouse gases over the globe could influence rising sea surface temperature and change large-scale atmospheric circulation in the Western North Pacific, which could enhance the intensity of tropical cyclones hitting land...
    709 Words | 3 Pages
  • Disasters: Tropical Cyclone and Big Electric Spark
    What is a disaster? Disaster, in this article, a sudden, accidental event that causes many deaths and injuries. Most disasters also result in significant property damage. Common natural causes of disasters include earthquakes, floods, hurricanes and typhoons, and tornadoes. Tsunamis (popularly, but incorrectly, known as tidal waves), volcanic eruptions, wildfires, and landslides and avalanches rank among the other natural forces that sometimes create disasters. Man made Not all disasters...
    2,822 Words | 9 Pages
  • Hurricanes: Tropical Cyclone and Hurricane Camille Hurricane
    Hurricanes Hurricanes, typhoons, and cyclones are all extremely strong tropical storms. Tropical storms are storms that originate in tropics and have wind speeds 36-73 mph. Once it reaches tropical storm status, the storm is given a name, and tracked by radar. The storm continues to grow and gain energy. Most tropical storms reach hurricane status in the western parts of the oceans. Their earliest origins often lie far to the east called tropical disturbances. Tropical disturbances are...
    1,405 Words | 4 Pages
  • Cyclone Nilam - 286 Words
    Cyclonic Storm Nilam (IMD designation: BOB 02, JTWC designation: 02B, also known as Cyclone Nilam) was the worst tropical cyclone to directly affect south India since Cyclone Jal in 2010. Originating from an area of low pressure over the Bay of Bengal on October 28, the system began as a weak depression 550 km (340 mi) east-northeast of Trincomalee, Sri Lanka. Over the following few days, the depression gradually intensified into a deep depression, and subsequently a Cyclonic Storm by October...
    286 Words | 1 Page
  • Cyclone Larry - 909 Words
    Tropical Cyclones: Cyclone Larry A tropical cyclone is a powerful tropical storm that forms between 5° and 20° south or north of the Equator over warm oceans. Once formed, they can last for a few days to over three weeks. They usually form over the northern areas of Australia from November-April each year. For a cyclone to be able to develop there are many key processes that have to occur. The cyclones form over oceans that have a water temperature greater than 26.5°C. When moist, warm...
    909 Words | 3 Pages
  • Cyclone Larry - 725 Words
    What is a tropical cyclone? A tropical cyclone is a storm system in the Southern Hemisphere, with a closed circulation around a center of low pressure, driven by heat energy released as moist air drawn in over warm ocean waters rises and condenses. The circular eye or centre of a tropical cyclone is an area characterised by light winds and often by clear skies. They derive their energy from the warm tropical oceans and do not form unless the sea-surface temperature is above 26.5°C, although,...
    725 Words | 3 Pages
  • Cyclone Tracy - 991 Words
    Cyclone Tracy Cyclone Tracy has been labelled by many as the most severe Tropical Cyclone to ever affect Australia. A vast majority of Darwin was completely demolished during the 25th of December 1974. Even though the cyclone is considered small in world standards’, stretching with a radius of just 50km, Tracy was very intense. In Darwin Airport, a wind of 217km/h was recorded before the anemometer was destroyed. On the 20th of December 1974, what was soon to be Cyclone Tracy was identified...
    991 Words | 3 Pages
  • Cyclone Nargis - 2161 Words
    Cyclone Nargis, crossing the south of Burma over two days, can accord recognition for bringing devastating loss to the Ayeyarwady Delta region , particularly to the extremely vulnerable social groups within. As the United Nation estimates, 2.4 million people were affected due to this category 4 cyclone that sustained winds of 210 km per hour, and in light of this, the mitigation and response following the cyclone proved to be poor and limited. This was accountable to several factors including...
    2,161 Words | 6 Pages
  • Tropical Storms - 546 Words
    Emergency teams were activated as residents along the Gulf of Mexico prepared to get hit with another strong storm for the second time in less than a month. Tropical Storm Edouard gained speed as it moved west Monday and was expected to strengthen to a near-hurricane before making landfall somewhere in Texas or southwest Louisiana. A tropical storm warning was in effect from the mouth of the Mississippi River westward to San Luis Pass in Texas. A hurricane watch was in effect from west of...
    546 Words | 3 Pages
  • Cyclone Tracy - 647 Words
    CYCLONE TRACY Basic Natural Disaster Facts Name: Cyclone Tracy Date: 24th December 1974 Location: Darwin, Northern Territory Australia Duration: The storm was apparent in Darwin for approximately 18 hours, but the worst effects of the storm was over a period of 6 hours Map: Strength and Magnitude According to the bom.gov.au Cyclone Tracy was relatively small but intense at landfall and was rated a category 4 tropical cyclone. The destruction was so forceful that wind gauges were...
    647 Words | 2 Pages
  • Effect of Flood and Cyclone - 3124 Words
    Introduction: Bangladesh is prone to a variety of natural hazards. It has witnessed the havoc of some of the worst natural disasters of the world due to tropical cyclones and storm surges. Floods and local seasonal storms are annual events which cause loss of lives and damage to housing, agriculture and economy. The country is also exposed to the risk of earthquakes. There are other natural hazard concerns such as coastal erosion and sea level rise due to global warming, which have been in the...
    3,124 Words | 11 Pages
  • Tornado Vs Cyclone - 381 Words
    Differences between Cyclone and Tornado Cyclone and Tornado are two furies of nature that show differences between them in terms of their nature and phenomenon. (i) One of the main differences between cyclone and tornado is that cyclone develops over sheets of water. On the other hand tornado develops over land. (ii) Both of them differ in terms of their duration. Cyclone lasts for longer duration when compared to tornado. It is quite true that a tornado can last for only a few minutes,...
    381 Words | 2 Pages
  • Cyclone Yasi Speech - 450 Words
    Cyclone Yasi Speech Good morning Mr. Black head of the State Emergence Service and fellow volunteers. Cyclone Yasi began developing as a tropical storm near Fiji on 29th January. The system quickly changed and became a cyclone and was named Yasi at 10pm on the 30th by Fiji Meteorological Service. Yasi headed in a westward track and rapidly intensified, from a Category 2 at 10am on 31st January and then further to a Category 3 at 7pm that day. Yasi maintained Category 3 intensity for the next...
    450 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Impacts of Cyclone Tracy - 1378 Words
    Alia Huberman 29/03/2012 Alia Huberman 29/03/2012 Cyclone Tracy – Anatomy of a Disaster 9.1 HSIE Australia’s Physical Environment Cyclone Tracy – Anatomy of a Disaster 9.1 HSIE Australia’s Physical Environment What is a natural hazard? A natural hazard is a situation in which the forces of nature combine to cause destruction. When a natural hazard impacts on a community causing wreckage...
    1,378 Words | 4 Pages
  • Cyclone Tracy Letter - 1297 Words
    Cyclone Tracy Letter Katia Kelson Darwin, NT 14 Chelsey Street Australia Dear Brother, It’s been 3 months but please don’t panic, I’m fine. I’ve wanted to write this letter to you ages ago but I haven’t had the time. I must have the worst luck to move to Darwin a few weeks before Cyclone Tracy hit. And it hit during Christmas Eve too! Horrible isn’t it? But don’t worry, I made it out in one piece. Knowing you, you probably want the details of this experience so I’ve decided to tell you...
    1,297 Words | 5 Pages
  • The 1970 Cyclone in Bangladesh - 307 Words
    the 1970 Cyclone (Nov 12-13) with cyclonic surge of 3.05m to 10.6m high with wind speed of 222 km/h occurred during high tide causing most appalling natural disaster claiming 0.3 million human lives. On the 29 April 1991 a devastating cyclone hit Chittagong, Cox's Bazar, Barisal, Noakhali, Patuakhali, Barguna and Khulna along with tidal bore of 5-8m high with wind speed of 240 km/h which killed 150,000 human beings, 70,000 cattlehead, and the total loss was about Tk 60 billion. [HS Mozaddad...
    307 Words | 2 Pages
  • bangladesh cyclones in 1991 - 1681 Words
     DISASTER MANAGEMENT HOME ASSIGNMENT -1 A CASE STUDY ON BANGLADESH CYCLONES IN 1991 1. INTRODUCTION A "Cyclonic Storm" or a "Cyclone" is an intense vortex or a whirl in the atmosphere with very strong winds circulating around it in anti-clockwise direction in the...
    1,681 Words | 6 Pages
  • Tropical storm essay - 1389 Words
    Olivia Ince “The impact of tropical storms Katrina and Nargis were beyond the scope of government to manage effectively” Discuss. Tropical storms have different names depending on their location i.e., in North America and the Caribbean they are known as hurricanes whereas in India and Bangladesh they are known as cyclones. There are various factors which need to be in place for a tropical storm to occur including sea temperatures to be over 27ºC to provide a source of energy, warm water...
    1,389 Words | 4 Pages
  • Global Management of tropical storms
    Rowan Ferguson Using examples, Examine the success of different approaches to manage tropical storms (hurricanes and cyclones) When discussing management strategies, it is important to use a system to categorise various approaches. In reference to a natural hazard there are number of ways management schemes attempt to deal with these events. Management schemes can modify the event; decrease its severity or alter its course or even incidence, they can modify the vulnerability: prepare for...
    586 Words | 2 Pages
  • leasons learnt from cyclone phailin
    Lessons learnt from cyclone phailin :- The earth has been affected by the natural hazards over a long time as man emerged into the picture that the natural occurrences were becoming disaster, together with being documented in various ways providing a warning for the future generation. Nature is our wise old teacher, if we are willing to observe, listen and learn both in happier times and in our responses to the powerful forces of nature that have the capacity to destroy us, there are lessons...
    3,157 Words | 9 Pages
  • Mid-Latitude Cyclone in South Hemisphere
    Author’s Name Instructor’s Name Course Date Mid Latitude Cyclone in Southern Hemisphere A mid latitude cyclone can also be referred to as an extratropical cyclone. As the name mid latitude suggests, they are found outside the tropics but before the north and south poles, approximately between 23 and 66 degrees on each of the hemispheres or the temperate zones of the earth between the Antarctic and the Arctic Polar Regions and the tropics. A cyclone on the other had refers to a location that...
    562 Words | 2 Pages
  • Explain The Causes Of Tropical Revolving Storms
    (A) Explain the causes of tropical revolving storms. (8) One of the causes of tropical revolving storms is the rotation of the Earth. For a cyclone to form a certain amount of ‘spin’ is needed to initiate the characteristic rotating motion of a tropical cyclone. The influence of the Earth’s rotation on the surface is known as the Coriolis Effect. This increases with distance away from the Equator and also explains why hurricanes do not usually form in region 5oN – 5oS. Another cause of tropical...
    254 Words | 1 Page
  • Report on Cyclone and Its Effects in Orissa in October 2010
    In the latter half of October 1999, a tropical disturbance formed in the South China Sea. As the system tracked westward, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) issued a Tropical Cyclone Formation Alert (TCFA) out of concern that the system could significantly develop. When it failed to do so, the alert was discontinued. Then, on 25 October, the system became organized and another TCFA was issued. It was determined shortly after that a tropical depression had formed over the Malay Peninsula,...
    595 Words | 2 Pages
  • Explain the differences between the impacts of hurricane Katrina and Cyclone Nargis.
    Explain the differences between the impacts of hurricane Katrina and Cyclone Nargis. (40 marks) Tropical revolving storms have a marked influence on the areas they consume. Whether it’s at the point of striking (our primary effects) or the secondary factors days/months/years afterwards: they impact on the social, environmental and economic stature of an area. This is evident when comparing two of the most notable tropical revolving storms in the last decade. Hurricane Katrina hit the MEDC...
    1,760 Words | 5 Pages
  • An essay comparing and contrasting the effects of a tropical storm in a MEDC country and a LEDC country
    All natural disasters cause havoc but one of the most common natural disasters are Hurricanes. They occur in both LEDC countries and MEDC countries. The USA is an example of a MEDC country which copes with the mess and destruction a hurricane causes and Bangladesh is an LEDC country that has to cope with hurricanes. However they both cope in entirely different ways due to one thing. Money. The USA has enough money to afford expensive, accurate technology to track when a hurricane will arrive...
    340 Words | 1 Page
  • To What Extent Can Preparedness Mitigate The Impacts Of Tropical Revolving Storms
    To what extent can preparedness mitigate the impacts of tropical revolving storms? (40 marks) Tropical revolving storms can be referred to as Hurricanes, cyclones and Typhoons these occur in the Atlantic, Indian and pacific oceans. Nobody is quite sure how they form but certain factors do need to be met for one to form. One of these is the temperature of the sea which has to be above 28degrees, the water also has to be deep beneath the storm, this is how the storm gathers its energy. These...
    1,107 Words | 3 Pages
  • To what extent can preparedness and planning mitigate the effects of tropical revolving storms
    To what extent can preparedness and planning mitigate the effects of tropical revolving storms? (40 marker) A tropical revolving storm is a term that covers hurricanes, tropical cyclones, typhoons and willy-willies. These intense low-pressure weather systems are associated with catastrophic wind speeds averaging at 120kmph and torrential rainfall. Tropical revolving storms are huge and extremely violent extending to about 500km in diameter. They occur in the tropics and the sub-tropics and...
    1,224 Words | 4 Pages
  • The hazards presented by tropical revolving storms have the greatest impact on the world s poorest people
    'The hazards presented by tropical revolving storms have the greatest impact on the world's poorest people.' Discuss. Tropical revolving storms occur in every area of the world, affecting both the richest and poorest countries. The effects of such storms can be devastating to even the richest and most developed countries; however it is often the case that poorer countries are affected most adversely by tropical revolving storms in both humanitarian and economic terms. For example, whilst...
    1,429 Words | 4 Pages
  • To What Extent Are The Impacts Of Tropical Revolving Storms Determined By Human Factors Rather Than Physical Factors
    To what extent are the impacts of Tropical Revolving storms determined by human factors rather than physical factors? (40marks) A tropical revolving storm is a huge and extremely violent tropical storm which can be up to 500km in diameter. The Coriolis force is the driving force behind the spinning of these storms creating a lot of the storms power. These TRS are either known as hurricanes in the North Atlantic Region or Typhoons in the South East Asia region. However to become a TRS they have...
    1,356 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Differing Levels of Damage Between Hurricane Katrina and Cyclone Nargis Reflect the Relative Economic Power of the Two Countries
    'The differing levels of damage between Hurricane Katrina and Cyclone Nargis reflect the relative economic power of the two countries' Hurricane Katrina started its formation on the 23rd of August 2005, and Dissipated on the 30th of August 2005. This Hurricane affected most of eastern north america (MEDC)w and was a category 5 hurricane, the winds got up to 175 mph (sustained over 1 min) Cyclone Nargis formed on the 27th of april 2008 and dissipated on 3rd of may 2008, the Cyclone affected...
    655 Words | 2 Pages
  • To what extent can preparedness and planning mitigate the effects of tropical revolving storms? [40]
    To what extent can preparedness and planning mitigate the effects of tropical revolving storms? [40] Tropical revolving storms are also known as hurricanes, typhoons and cyclones. They occur in the tropics and sub-tropics and form over the oceans where sea surface temperatures are above 27 degrees C. The impact of tropical revolving storms can be devastating. Examples of major natural disasters caused by these storms are Hurricane Katrina in 2005, and Tropical Cyclone Nargis in 2008. The main...
    557 Words | 2 Pages
  • 'the Impact of a Tropical Storm Depends on Location' How Far Do You Agree with This Statement?
    “The Impact of a Tropical Storm depends on location” How far do you agree? Tropical storms formed 5-30 degrees north of the equator, so if there is a largely populated area or economic centre around this latitude, in an area vulnerable to hurricanes, the impact will be increased in comparison to the tropical storm running its course over unpopulated islands or the ocean. This can be seen when looking at Hurricane Sandy, a tropical storm of 2012 and its impact on Cuba. Cuba was located in the...
    828 Words | 2 Pages
  • “the Hazards Presented by Tropical Storms Have the Greatest Impact on the World’s Poorest People.” to What Extent Do You Agree with This View? (40 Marks)
    “The hazards presented by Tropical storms have the greatest impact on the world’s poorest people.” To what extent do you agree with this view? (40 marks) Tropical storms are defined as low pressure systems that form over tropical seas and can devastate areas of human settlements with hurricane force winds and floods. The severity of these impacts varies greatly depending on a countries development levels and is attributable to numerous factors such as: infrastructure, job structure, the...
    1,229 Words | 4 Pages
  • Describe the Characteristics of the Following Winds I. Prevailing Winds Ii. Seasonal Winds Iii. Cyclones Iv. Local Winds in Terms of Their Origin/Source, Features and Their Effects on the Climate.
    Wind is caused by differences in atmospheric pressure created, in large part, by the unequal heating of the earth's surface by the sun. Air moves from a region of higher pressure to one of lower pressure and this movement is wind. Any difference in pressure will cause wind, but the greater the difference the stronger the wind. The direction that wind takes is influenced by the rotation of the earth. On a non-rotating earth wind would move in a straight path from a high- to a low-pressure area....
    4,316 Words | 11 Pages
  • Hurricanes - 1658 Words
    English 100 #3221 17 May 2007 Hurricanes A hurricane is one of the most severe storms the country has to endure. A hurricane can easily damage millions of dollars of property and even kill anyone in their paths. A hurricane is a local name for tropical cyclones in the Caribbean, Nnorth Atlantic and Eeastern Nnorthern Pacific. On average there are about six hurricanes in a season and of those about 2 reach become a major hurricane. Hurricane season starts in June and ends in November. A...
    1,658 Words | 5 Pages
  • Isaac's Storm - 644 Words
    Isaac’s Storm Isaac Cline dealt with perils that no one should have ever had to endure. Erik Larson was very good at describing what he thought and saw, but a little too much. His descriptions were too lengthy and the subject didn’t catch my attention until much later in the book. The book was written very well it excluded the too familiar he said she saids. The language flows with clarity and precision. His recount of the storm’s destruction sucks you into the dramatic effects as the storm...
    644 Words | 2 Pages
  • Study Guide Exam 3
    Professor FitzGerald Spring 2014 Introduction to Beaches and Shorelines ES 142 STUDY QUESTIONS #3 Subject: Climatic Effects On Shorelines Refer to Chapter 5 1. How are barriers formed along the North Slope of Alaska? 2. Why are rivers muddier in the South than they are in the North? 3. What happens to the calcium carbonate (CaCO3, shells and coral) content of beaches from...
    631 Words | 3 Pages
  • New Orleans Levees - 1760 Words
    For years now the discussions have arose about the levee systems in America and how some are not safe and need to be replaced. This problem has been focused on the levee system in New Orleans. Many engineers and other people have asked the question whether or not the present levee system in New Orleans could withstand a huge wave or a direct hit from a powerful hurricane. These questions were answered when Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans as a Category 3 hurricane which isn't even the most...
    1,760 Words | 5 Pages
  • I Survived Hurricane Katrina
    I survived Hurricane Katrina, 2005 By, Lauren Tarshis In New Orleans, Louisiana lived a boy named Barry Tucker. He was 11 eleven years old and lived with him mom, dad and baby sister. Hurricane Katrina was getting ready to land in New Orleans. All families had to evacuate. Barry’s family had boarded up there house and packed up there car. They started heading for Texas. They were stuck in major traffic backed up for two hours. Barry’s little sister became very sick. They decided that...
    372 Words | 1 Page
  • Harley-Davidson Case Study Solution of Inc.2008
    Cyclonic Storm Mahasen Cyclonic Storm Mahasen was a relatively weak tropical cyclone that caused loss of life across six countries in Southern and Southeastern Asia. Originating from an area of low pressure over the southern Bay of Bengal in early May, Mahasen slowly organized. Remaining nearly stationary, it consolidated into a depression on May 10. Gradually gaining forward momentum, the depression attained gale-force winds on May 11 and was designated as Cyclonic Storm Mahasen, the first...
    906 Words | 3 Pages
  • natural disaster - 374 Words
    When I watched News on the TV, suddenly coming breaking news about disasters. Many disaster exist in the world. Such as earthquakes, hurricane, and other etc. we called natural disaster. My questions start this point. Why disaster only explained by natural disasters? Those disasters only related with natural disaster? If natural disaster coming by difference reason like man-made, did we make any confusion between natural disaster and man-made disaster? Natural Types of...
    374 Words | 2 Pages
  • how education can help in nation's development
    Intro to cylones: In meteorology, a cyclone is an area of closed, circular fluid motion rotating in the same direction as the Earth.[1][2] This is usually characterized by inward spiraling winds that rotate anti-clockwise in the Northern Hemisphere and clockwise in the Southern Hemisphere of the Earth. Most large-scale cyclonic circulations are centered on areas of low atmospheric pressure.[3][4] The largest low-pressure systems are cold-core polar cyclones and extratropical cyclones which lie...
    2,224 Words | 7 Pages
  • Extreme Weather Events over India in the Last 100 Years
    J. Ind. Geophys. Union ( July 2005 ) Vol.9, No.3, pp.173-187 Extreme Weather Events over India in the last 100 years U.S.De, R.K.Dube1 and G.S.Prakasa Rao2 Visiting faculty Department of Environmental Science/University of Pune, India and Former Additional Director General of Meteorology (Research), Pune 1 Retd.ADGM, Flat No.69, Mausam Apartments, Delhi – 110 034 2 India Meteorological Department, National Data Centre, Pune – 411 005 ABSTRACT India being mainly an agricultural country the...
    8,639 Words | 25 Pages
  • earthquakes coursework notes - 1834 Words
    Death Toll from a Earthquake!! Number of Earthquakes Worldwide for 2000 - 2012 Located by the US Geological Survey National Earthquake Information Center (M4.5+ for most of the world; doesn't include US regional network contributions) Magnitude 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 8.0 to 9.9 1 1 0 1 2 1 2 4 0 1 1 1 2 7.0 to 7.9 14 15 13 14 14 10 9 14 12 16 23 19 12 6.0 to 6.9 146 121 127 140 141...
    1,834 Words | 11 Pages
  • Metaphor paper - 689 Words
    The words flow slowly at first, hesitant, struggling to take form. Like condensed cloud clusters, fragments of information around which I can build a plot, or a character, rotate slowly around in my head. As an idea for a story takes shape, the thoughts begin to swirl faster, spinning faster and faster, gaining momentum and speed. As I pick up my pencil I am a hurricane when I write, the words spewing forth onto the paper, accelerating with unexpected intensity. But such intensity is impossible...
    689 Words | 2 Pages
  • Precautionary Measures - 1546 Words
    Below is a more comprehensive list of precautionary measures we can do before, during, and after a typhoon. They may be additional measures that may be added to these lists. Before a Typhoon: 1. Help your family check and fix your house for any damage (especially the roofs and windows), so it can withstand the strong winds. 2. Remind your family members to stock up an adequate food supply such as rice, canned goods, and foods that would last even without refrigeration. 3. Stock up an adequate...
    1,546 Words | 5 Pages
  • Windy System - 564 Words
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  • Esther - 530 Words
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    There are a number of natural disasters that occur and cause damage to us. There are many kind of disasters like Earthquakes, Floods, Cyclones, Tornadoes, Thunderstorms, Avalanches, Volcanic Eruptions, Tsunami etc. It is God’s blessing that we don’t have all of these but a few of them. Usually Earthquakes, Floods, Avalanches, Thunderstorms occur in our country. A flood is an overflow of an expanse of water that submerges land. The EU Floods directive defines a flood as a temporary...
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  • Prepare for Hurricane - 435 Words
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  • Hurricane Sandy Case Study
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    The Hurricane. The poem ‘The Hurricane’ creates a tense and fearful atmosphere to such an extent that the reader is made to feel as though they have lived through the hurricane themselves. The poet also uses many poetic devices to express this feeling, as well as almost exaggerating the aftermath. All of this creates the vivid atmosphere of the ‘roaring, screaming and returning,’ that was so relentless in the poet’s eyes on the day of the hurricane. The scene of the poem is set in the first...
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