Standardized test Essays & Research Papers

Best Standardized test Essays

  • Standardized Tests - 462 Words
    Clemmitt, Marcia. "School Reform." CQ Researcher 29 Apr. 2011: 385-408. Web. 23 July 2014. - This citation is from CQ Researcher that just talks about standardized testing in general and if whether or not teachers as well as students should be evaluated solely by their performances on these tests. It also contains some useful statistics about tests scores. I can use the information from this source in the introduction. This would be useful in the introduction because it is just an overview of...
    462 Words | 2 Pages
  • Standardized Tests - 1382 Words
    Problems with Standardized Testing Do standardized test scores accurately describe the achievements of a student? Regardless of what reports and newspapers suggest, scores on standardized tests do not reflect a student’s achievements or abilities. Standardized tests such as the SAT and ACT are the focus of argument not only among teachers and educational reformers, but also among students. Opponents agree that the standardized tests are weighted too heavily, and that test anxiety obstructs...
    1,382 Words | 4 Pages
  • Standardized Tests - 2501 Words
    Standardized Tests: Are they worth it? For years, children of all ages have been required to take standardized tests in order to assess their capabilities and theoretically prepare them for further education. These tests are often the main factor in acceptance into colleges and universities, used in grade advancement for younger ages, and an overall indicator of a person’s ability. However, because of the lack of variety in the subjects they evaluate, standardized tests are often under...
    2,501 Words | 6 Pages
  • standardized test - 678 Words
    Resolve: A national standardized test is a good measurement of high school student ability and school quality. Introduction: Academic tests can’t provide valueable measurements of students’ and schools’ comprehensive abilities. Outline I. Temperory Skills vs. Life Skills A. Most of the skills are temperory skills, a lot of people don’t need these skills for lifelong. B. Some teachers hold the idea “ teach to the test”, just care about students’ grades rather than teaching them some...
    678 Words | 3 Pages
  • All Standardized test Essays

  • Standardized Tests - 810 Words
    Standardized Tests Schools across the United States are forced to give their students standardized tests. Standardized tests are multiple choice tests based on a list of state standards that a teacher is required to teach. The state makes schools give these tests to measure student achievement. In most schools, these tests go toward a big percentage of a student’s grade and in some cases determine whether the student will pass or fail a class. One can argue that standardized tests are useful;...
    810 Words | 3 Pages
  • Standardized Test and Dormitory Lodges
    ACHIEVEMENT LEVEL OF BS NURSING STUDENT LIVING WITH FAMILY AND DORMITORY LODGES A RESEARCH Presented to The Faculty of Psychology Department Our Lady of Fatima University Quezon City In Partial Fulfillment Of the Requirements for the Degree Bachelor of Science in Psychology By: Calinisan, Irish D. Oxeniola, Eryenn Mae M. Silvero, Mary Rose Ann M. October, 2009 Chapter 1 THE PROBLEM AND ITS BACKGROUND Introduction In entering college, many important factors that...
    7,107 Words | 22 Pages
  • The Usefulness of Standardized Tests - 1211 Words
    The Usefulness of Standardized Tests When one is employed at a school, and starts noticing loads of confidential boxes being delivered, “Smarties” candies and “Smart Pencils” being distributed to students, and last but not least; witnessing that the stress of the school is rising…You know it’s testing time. This all happens at the beginning, middle, and end of the school year. Many tests take 1 to 2 days when others, have a duration of 2-3 weeks. As an employee of an elementary school,...
    1,211 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Effects of Standardized Tests on Education
    The Effects of Standardized Tests on Education Lawrence Jackson Armstrong Atlantic State University Standardized tests have been debated and argued for as many years as they have existed. It is worthwhile to look at some of the arguments for both sides and find out if there can be some middle ground. Two important factors of standardized tests are the way the tests are administered and how the results are handled. These two issues may be more important than the tests...
    1,562 Words | 5 Pages
  • Standardized Tests and Their Effect on the Community
    Standardized Tests and Their Effect on the Community Carol Childs Prof. Moore / Saint Leo University SSC101 14 October 2012 There are many types of standardized tests used within schools to determine levels of intelligence and knowledge of subject matter. Teachers and the school board use these test results to determine areas that need improvement for the student and what subject areas they excel in. For students, many of them do not like taking tests especially when they hold a very...
    3,230 Words | 8 Pages
  • Psychometrics Versus Standardized Tests
    I believe that we should have a standardized test for High School students to graduate. It is a way of measuring basic skills of students. It puts all the knowledge of what we have learned over the past 12 years to the test. It’s put in a test to see how much you’ve truly learned and to prepare you for your adult life. Another reason we should have this standardized test is because it will better prepare the students for college. Students are given this final test and are released into the real...
    433 Words | 1 Page
  • The Problem with Standardized Tests
    The Problem With Standardized Testing Erik Meyer Right now, a student and his parent are leaving parent-teacher conferences and are in a heated debate, and the student asks, "Why do I have to study subjects that I'll never use again?" His mother will stand there blank-eyed, and think for a moment and lie, saying, "You know, in order to get a good job you need a good degree, and these subjeccts will help you get that good degree. You know, I never had this opportunity when I was younger." He...
    734 Words | 2 Pages
  • Are Standardized Tests Necessary?
    Are Standardized Tests Necessary? Students quietly took their seats in the large desk-packed room and neatly aligned their number-two pencils on their desks. Nervousness filled the students’ minds as their hands grew sweaty and their hearts began to race. Questions began to storm around their minds: “What if I do not finish my essay in time? What if I do not understand a vocab question?” The proctor starts the timer right as the final deadliest question penetrates every student’s mind: “What...
    912 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Validity of Standardized Tests - 1261 Words
    Standardized testing is the scourge that plagues the classroom and renders immobile the wheels of thought in a quagmire of ineffectual batteries of questions unintentionally fashioned to inaccurately assess a student's mastery of subject material. I intend to research the validity of standardized tests in school. The standardized tests can include the Stanford 9, PSAT, SAT, CRCT, etc. I chose this topic because I feel that educators and political leaders place an undue amount of importance on...
    1,261 Words | 4 Pages
  • Standardized Tests; The SAT andACT
    The SAT and ACT, both standardized test scores used as an indicator of students’ academic abilities, are taken each year by thousands of students planning to enroll in some category of post-secondary education. These are thought to be accurate indicators of a student’s academic ability, but this is not always true. I feel that more often than not, these tests are rough indicators of a student’s ability. They test what the student SHOULD know, rather than what courses, and the depth of said...
    437 Words | 2 Pages
  • Abolish Standardized Test for University Admission
    Abolish Standardized Test for University Admission What is the purpose of standardized test, such as Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) or American College Testing (ACT), for university admission? It was first introduced in 1930s to reduce socio­economic discrimination in admissions. James Bryan Conant, who was the President of Harvard University, discovered a number of qualified working­class students were rejected in ...
    653 Words | 1 Page
  • Standardized Test Improving Education in America
    Standardized Test Improving Education in America The use of standardized tests became very popular after the No Child Left behind Act (NCLB) was passed in 2001. The NCLB required yearly testing starting in the 3rd grade, in all 50 states. US students fell from 18th in the world in math in 2000 to 31st in 2009, with a similar drop in science and we haven’t had any changes in reading. One argument is that standardized tests are a fair and measure the ability of students, they make sure...
    570 Words | 2 Pages
  • Standardized Test Scores and Its Effects on Students
    Have you ever sat down and thought about college and how one test can determine what college you can/will get accepted to. Everyone knows that colleges place so much stock into these standardized test scores. Knowing this makes students worried and develop anxiety about test taking. Colleges use these standardized tests to predict how well we do in college to succeed.Colleges shouldn’t be allowed to put that much pressure on us for our test scores on SAT’s or Act’s. “We all have...
    767 Words | 2 Pages
  • Standardized English Proficiency Test Ploicy
    Prompt: Most of the professors in the Department of Applied Foreign Languages strongly suggest that an English major should reach an acceptable score of a standardized English proficiency test (e.g., TOEIC, IELTS) before graduation. Otherwise, he or she should not be qualified for graduating with a college diploma. Do you agree or disagree with such policy? Support your arguments with specific examples. • Write your essay in the box. |As time changes, the opportunities of studying at college...
    433 Words | 2 Pages
  • Standardized Tests and Tracking in the Public Education System
    Analytic Narrative of Project KIPP Adelante is a charter school that serves primarily underrepresented and underserved students of Hispanic and African American ethnicity in downtown San Diego. According to the California Department of Education (CDE) School Accountability Report Card (SARC) for the year 2012, KIPP had a total of 363 students enrolled in grades 5 through 8; this is the most recent data available. Student demographics are as follows; 315 Hispanic, 28 African American, and the...
    3,748 Words | 10 Pages
  • Why Standardized Tests Are Ineffective at Measuring a Student's Capabilities
    A Test Destined For Failure In America, standardized testing has become a prevalent method for testing the educational ability of students. Tests such as the SAT for College and the California STAR for elementary and junior high students have been administered since the beginning of the 20th century. These tests are often considered by many as crucial for the academic progression of students into further education, such as an elementary student being promoted from third to fourth grade or a...
    588 Words | 2 Pages
  • Do Standardized Tests Really Measure Intelligence?
    Definitional Argument Analysis Do Standardized Tests Really Measure Intelligence? Some may beg to differ when people say the SAT or ACT are not fair to everyone. Not everyone may test well, so these tests are not an accurate assessment of someone’s intelligence. According to Merriam-Webster Dictionary, the SAT first stood for the Scholastic Aptitude Test, then the Scholastic Assessment Test; now it does not stand for anything. The SAT is a college entrance exam for high school students, and...
    913 Words | 3 Pages
  • Standardized Testing = Standardized Students
    Standardized Testing = Standardized Students SAT, SAT II, ACT, PSAT, AP, STAR, CASHEE, LSAT, MCAT, GMAT…when will this list ever end? Standardized testing has taken an eminent role in deciphering today’s education and unfortunately, there is a test for every occasion whether it is for kindergarten, high school, college, or graduate school admission, or for the state to base a school’s progression. The bottom line is that there is no escaping such demoralizing and discriminatory tests....
    1,611 Words | 5 Pages
  • Standardized Testing - 1220 Words
    Standardized testing is used practically worldwide for all sorts of various criterion. A standardized test could be used for getting into a top of the line college, or to see if you meet the requirements for a job. Such tests include the well known ACTs and SATs. There are many different ways that standardized tests can be graded. Norm-Referenced, and Criterion-Referenced forms of grading are just a couple of the types of tests. Tests can also be easily misused and are often...
    1,220 Words | 4 Pages
  • Should Standardized Test Be Abolished from the School Educational System in America?
    Should Standardized Tests be Abolished from the School Educational System in America? The standardized test issues have always been one of the most important issues in the educational system of a country. Standardized test is a test for which norms on a reference group, ordinarily drawn from many schools or communities, are provided (Van Kollenburg, Susan E., 2002). In simpler terms, standardized tests are designed to give a common measure of students’ performance. A very large amount of...
    3,611 Words | 10 Pages
  • Do Colleges Put Too Much Stock into Standardized Test?
    Topic: Do colleges put too much stock into standardized test Many students have the desire to succeed when taking college entrance tests, but some students have been proven as bad test takers which means they understand the concepts but are not able to put them on paper. Colleges should not deny prospective students just because their test scores are not as high as the next students; colleges should realize that students are more than just a standardized test score. Tests cannot predict how...
    1,055 Words | 3 Pages
  • standardized testing - 1240 Words
    One of the most controversial topics in education is the concept of standardized testing. Standardized testing has been around a long time and is used in many other ways besides in schools. Standardized testing can be used when getting a drivers license, or even to get a job. It first came about in 1917, when it was used as a mean of assessing militant recruits. During this time it was able to test young men quickly and enter them into the military based on their level of intelligence....
    1,240 Words | 4 Pages
  • standardized testing - 279 Words
    Jun Lee Extra Credit Standardized Testing In the argument between the affirmative and negative side of whether or not the use of standardized tests improve education, both sides clearly presented the history and status quo of how standardized tests have been a part of American education since the mid 1800s. Each side touched upon their own opinions about No Child Left Behind Act, and how the US students slipped from 18th in the world in math in 200 to 31st place in 2009, with a similar...
    279 Words | 1 Page
  • Standardized Testing - 1538 Words
    Standardized Testing Robert L. White Advanced Writing Bill Bohnert February 2, 2006 In years past thousands of grade school students have been drug throughout the school systems of the United States without a single thought to whether they acquired the knowledge necessary to be successful in the working world or college. Since the signing of No Child Left Behind Act by President George W. Bush, many believe standardized or "high stakes" testing places advantages and...
    1,538 Words | 5 Pages
  • standardized testing - 759 Words
    Child Growth & Development Standardized Testing Standardized testing has assumed a well-known role in recent efforts to advance the quality of education. Regardless of where they went to school or what curriculum they followed, students are tested on the same material, which can be loosely grouped into knowledge domains and skill sets that encompass; natural sciences, social sciences, humanities, reading, speaking, writing, and mathematics. National, state, and district tests, combined...
    759 Words | 3 Pages
  • Standardized Testing - 1158 Words
    Lainey Sullivan Evaluation Paper Standardized Testing Standardized tests are a common and popular way to evaluate the academic achievements of students, teachers and school districts. They are used in many areas such as the army, civil service, medicine and so on. Standardized tests are most widely used in the field of education to assess the academic performance of students. Two commonly known types of standardized tests in the United States are the SAT and the ACT. The SAT evaluates...
    1,158 Words | 4 Pages
  • Standardized Testing - 739 Words
    Standardized testing Att. Getter I would like for you all to close your eyes. You are sitting in a classroom with a test in front of you. Once you finish this test, you will know whether you passed the class or not. Open your eyes. How do you feel? Nervous or excited? Do you know what you just took? Reveal the Topic This test is called a standardize test. Standardize tests, according to Education.com, “Tests that are administered and scored under uniform standardized conditions”...
    739 Words | 3 Pages
  • Standardized Testing - 564 Words
    Justice Bell English Diagnostic Writing Standardized Testing Before Getting a Diploma? “Do not train children to learning by force and harshness, but direct them to it by what amuses their minds, so that you may be better able to discover with accuracy the peculiar bent of the genius of each.” (Plato) Students who are only taught things that will be on a test more likely forget everything once that test is over. Their minds are trained to think, “Since I'm only going to see this...
    564 Words | 2 Pages
  • Standardized Testing - 507 Words
    Is standardized testing improving our students’ academic achievement level? Or is it causing several high schools around the world to have a lower graduation rate? I personally feel that there should be no standardized test that determines if students graduate and receive their diploma. Causing stress on our teachers, lowering graduation rates, and putting at risk students at a higher risk is three of several reasons why standardized testing should no longer be permitted in our schools. All...
    507 Words | 2 Pages
  • Standardized Testing - 1035 Words
    Is standardized testing the way to go? You wake up in the morning belated for the bus because of sleeping late. You arrive in school, forgetting to brush your teeth and comb your hair. When you are confronted with the test, you are so tired and you get a pink eye. The next event you know is that you fail the test. Do you want to fail for just having an inadequate day? Standardized testing may cause you to stay in the same grade just for having an inadequate day, not getting enough sleep,...
    1,035 Words | 3 Pages
  • Standardized Testing - 1662 Words
    Standardized testing is the most commonly used and well known method of testing used in the United States and many other countries around the world, but can harm educational quality and promote inequality. Standardized testing is used to determine student achievement, growth and progress. Standardized tests are tests that attempt to present unbiased material under the same, predetermined conditions and with consistent scoring and interpretation so that students have equal opportunities to give...
    1,662 Words | 5 Pages
  • Do standardized test scores give a great indication of a schools capabilities?
    Edwards 1 Nijah Edwards Ms. Brittni Delmaine English III 1st Period September 24, 2014 The current era's education is known to be defined by students themselves, including their academic success, the value of educators and instructional quality in America, learning standards adopted by each individual state, anxiety, the role played by parents outside of a school setting, and much more. Most Americans believe that student's standardized test scores are the only legitimate indicator of a...
    1,226 Words | 4 Pages
  • Is It Right to Determine a Student's Future Based on Standardized Test Performance?
    "If my future were determined just by my performance on a standardized test, I wouldn't be here. I guarantee you that," Michelle Obama said. Intelligence has been defined in many different ways including logic, abstract thought, understanding, planning, and problem solving. Earlier it was believed that there was one underlying general factor at the intelligence base, but later psychologists maintained that it is more complicated and could not be determined by such a simplistic method. If...
    1,910 Words | 5 Pages
  • Standardized Testing - 1352 Words
    Standardized tests have historically been used as measures of how students compare with each other or how much of a particular curriculum they have learned. Increasingly, standardized tests are being used to make major decisions about students, such as grade promotion or high school graduation, and schools. More and more often, they also are intended to shape the curriculum and instruction. Students across America have had to repeat classes because of the way standardized tests are...
    1,352 Words | 4 Pages
  • Standardized Testing - 753 Words
    English I CPE/period 9 15 January 2013 Standardized testing should not be required to graduate high school Sitting in a classroom for forty-five minutes feels long and stressful. During the standardized tests students have to sit in a classroom for hours at a time, knowing that their future dreams of being a doctor, teacher, or lawyer could come to an end if they mess up one exam. Standardized tests should not be required for students to graduate high school. They cause...
    753 Words | 2 Pages
  • Why Standardized Tests Are a False Interpretation of Who the Child Really Is
    Becca Papineau Amanda Hararch English 102 Research Paper 15 April 2013 Standardized Testing: False Interpretation Do you hate staring at a computer/ piece of paper for more than two hours and answering questions? I am sure most people would answer “no”, and that is why standardized testing puts more harm than good in today’s world. Standardized testing causes a lot more problems than usual. It used to be a part of life, but now it’s causing kids not to go to college, and it’s causing...
    2,569 Words | 7 Pages
  • Should the Standardized Test Be the Only Measurement for Students’ Ability in Learning?
    Should the Standardized Test be the only Measurement for Students’ Ability in Learning? Part of our future is determined by how good we are in a test. Over the past decade, schools use standardized test for several purposes. For example, to pass students from the schools, to know their learning progress in schools, to place them in a class suited their abilities, or to measure their worthiness to enroll to a university. “A standardized test is a test that is administered and scored in a...
    1,480 Words | 4 Pages
  • Standardized Testing - 1037 Words
    English Comp. and Lang. AP Standardized Testing When you think of education, what comes to mind? Homework? Books? Essays? What about tests? Nowadays, that’s the only thing that seems to matter. As absurd as it is, no one truly cares about anything besides test scores; it’s all about how high students can score, and how good they can make the school look, rather than how much they can retain and actually apply when it really counts. Despite what some people may think, standardized testing is...
    1,037 Words | 3 Pages
  • Standardized Testing - 1252 Words
    Standardized testing is used across our nation as an assessment for students’ academic achievement. The t Act, No Child Left Behind, was signed into law on January 8th, 2002 by president George W. Bush. (Department of Education, 2005) This law was created to hold states and their schools accountable for the achievement of the students. Since then, each state has been required to create an accountability system for students’ performance. Many of these new testing systems hold strong...
    1,252 Words | 3 Pages
  • Standardized, Seriously? - 857 Words
    Standardized, Seriously? Shannon Kathleen Hough AP/IB English 3b Mr. Knight Period 1 March 16, 2011 Separating people according to academic success is not the right path to make children take their education seriously. For the past 14 years I have seen this firsthand. If a child is going to take their education seriously it’s because of brainwashing, natural fondness of school, or that their afraid of turning out like their parents. This is just merely my observation categorizing...
    857 Words | 3 Pages
  • Standardized Testing - 1320 Words
    English 1301 April 23, 2013 Standardized Testing in Texas The first standardized test was developed in France nearly 100 years ago by a psychologist named Alfred Binet. Binet’s test focused on language skills, judgment, comprehension, reasoning and memory, and was used to determine which students would succeed in regular classes and which needed special attention (Lefton). Binet’s test was successful in the Parisian school system and generated a lot of interest in America. An...
    1,320 Words | 4 Pages
  • Standardized Testing - 565 Words
    3 Casual Essay Annotated Bibliography Ingernira. “Examination and Standardized Testing: How to Improve Evaluations of Students.” HubPages. HubPages. n.d. Web. 11 March. 2013. The focus Ingernira pinpoints on in the article is recognizing that testing is required to gauge how much the student learned however, I feel that testing is needed to establish the financial solutions for each state and school to determine rather or not they will be able to receive a grant. Also the...
    565 Words | 2 Pages
  • Standardized Testing - 806 Words
    Thesis statement: Standardized tests in the public school system have become biased and they are becoming costly to the school systems. Introduction: According to Dr. Hoffman, it is the multiple-choice format that is to blame. “Multiple choice tests penalize the deep student, dampen creativity, foster intellectual dishonesty, and undermine the very foundations of education” he remarked in a 1977 interview. A standardized test is a test that uses uniform procedures for administration and...
    806 Words | 3 Pages
  • Standardized Testing - 624 Words
    The morning sunlight shining partially through the window onto a student who is waiting to begin his standardized exam. The student glancing through the window, looking at man running down the street trying to make it on time to work. The man has lingering thoughts on his mind about a project deadline that he should have been more organized with. The man running around the corner past a older women talking on the phone, a conversation that the man could not interpret. This older woman who...
    624 Words | 2 Pages
  • Standardized Testing - 1279 Words
    Synthesis Essay on Standardized Testing Standardized testing in the United States started in the mid- 1800’s (Standardized Tests - ProCon.org). This kind of testing was originally created to measure students’ performance and progress in school (Standardized Tests - ProCon.org). In recent years, the public school system has relied heavily on the information this test provides, in doing so creating controversy. Other than being a student myself, and participating in multiple standardized exams...
    1,279 Words | 4 Pages
  • Standardized testing - 1047 Words
    Standardized tests is a common way of measuring a student's progress and performance in school. The tests may vary by different schools and grades and it usually takes up a large portion of a student's total mark. Although it is purposely designed to be a consistent and accurate tool. However, many questions the effectiveness of standardized testing. Standardized testing is an inaccurate assessment because it does not effectively judge the student's ability to learn or understand, it can not...
    1,047 Words | 4 Pages
  • Standardized Testing - 1293 Words
    Why Standardized Testing is Not So Bad Standardized testing is a hot topic in the education system. Many people believe that this kind of testing does not accurately portray a students’ level of academia. However, many benefits of standardized testing go without being noticed. I believe that standardized testing not only helps the students with their education but also provides teachers and parents an insight on the students’ level of education by providing them with statistics and percentages...
    1,293 Words | 3 Pages
  • Standardized testing - 1747 Words
     Standardized testing is something you're bound to come across in public schools as soon as first grade. I remember taking test after test as a public school student, and I can't really say I ever got anything out of it. These tests are putting so much pressure on teachers and students a like. A bunch of old men sitting around a table who've never even stepped foot in my school can make a test and say that it evaluates what students have learned as a whole. The problem with standardized...
    1,747 Words | 4 Pages
  • standardized Testing - 2235 Words
    What’s So Wrong about Standardized Testing? Standardized testing in public schools is at an all time high. The state of Pennsylvania starts their testing on children as young as 10 or 11 years of age. Not to mention states like Georgia that begins testing kids while they are still in kindergarten. Many people can step up to defend standardized testing in schools, saying that it is in place to help build up our systems, and help to strengthen and progress the academic success of our young...
    2,235 Words | 6 Pages
  • Standardized Testing - 1251 Words
    Standardized Testing Should Be Stopped Are you one of the many students who cram in hours upon hours of studying the night before an exam that has been stressing you out all week? You wake up the next morning nervous and full of anxiety, just to take the same test as everyone else, under the same conditions as everyone else. Sounds fair right? Well I don’t believe it is, and here’s why. Standardized tests were made to test the knowledge of a student over a particular course or subject. The...
    1,251 Words | 4 Pages
  • psychometric tests - 2716 Words
    Introduction If a business wants to be successful, there are a lot of aspects need to be concerned. Business objectives are one of the most essential factors. Therefore, a firm needs to be very careful on their recruitment and selection process because choosing the right candidates that fit for the business could help the firm to be more likely to achieve the goals. However, it is not easy to find the right candidates due to different organizations seeking for different qualities of employees....
    2,716 Words | 8 Pages
  • a psychometric test - 568 Words
    What is the psychometric test? A psychometric test is a set of items that are designed to measure characteristics of human beings that pertain to behavior. Behavior is an observable and measurable action. Psychometric testing is not just the another subject that we may study in college,but it is a topic that personally affects many individuals, and the results of these test are used in ways that significantly affect us and those around us. For example, test scores are used to diagnose mental...
    568 Words | 2 Pages
  • Abolishing Grading - Standardized Testing
    Arguments for Grading * Standardized testing prepares students for college (but if there is not testing at any level then there is no need for standardized testing.) * It is practical- strict directions and easy to give and time efficient and easy to grade * Standardized testing offsets grade inflation ( consistently compares student knowledge) * Standardized testing is objective bc a machine grade it and the mood biases do not affect the grade. * Without grading how can u...
    352 Words | 2 Pages
  • Psychometric Test - 1209 Words
    Assessing the ability of blind and partially sighted people: are psychometric tests fair? 1. Introduction Psychometric or standardised tests are assessments that measure knowledge, abilities, attitudes and personality traits. They are used in education and recruitment and can consist of written, online or oral tests. Blind and partially sighted individuals are potentially disadvantaged by the use of these tests. RNIB is often approached by teachers and parents concerned about the...
    1,209 Words | 4 Pages
  • Phychometric Tests - 2533 Words
    Preparing for psychometric tests Employers and careers services, amongst others, are increasingly aware of the value of psychometric tests. ‘Psychometric’ means the tests have been carefully developed to measure abilities, aptitudes, skills, interests or aspects of personality. The ones you will most commonly encounter are ‘ability’/‘aptitude’ tests or ‘personality’ measures. THE ADANTAGES OF PSYCHOMETRIC TESTS Psychometric tests are an additional opportunity to demonstrate your...
    2,533 Words | 12 Pages
  • Standardized Testing Premise - 674 Words
    Joseph Cruz Garcia Premise 1 “The Case against Standardized Testing” by Alfie Kohn clearly outlines quite a few problems with thousands of schools across the nation placing so much emphasis and meaning on standardized testing. Alfie Kohn has been described by Time Magazine as perhaps the country’s most outspoken critic of education’s fixation on grades and test scores. Our students are tested to an extent that is unprecedented in American history and unparalleled anywhere in the world....
    674 Words | 2 Pages
  • Argument Essay: Standardized Testing
    Standardized Testing: Good or Bad? If someone was to ask you “how do you define student achievement?” what would your answer be? Would you say student achievement is measured by state achievement tests? Or would you say that student achievement is too complex a subject to be objectively measured? There are many important skills students must be taught, and we need a way to effectively measure if they are in fact learning those skills. However, standardized tests cannot effectively show the...
    938 Words | 3 Pages
  • Harmful Effects of Standardized Testing
    Genevieve English 1301 July 5, 2012 Standardized Testing A Fault in School Systems Standardized testing had become a norm throughout the entire nation. From grade level students to high school students, college admittances tests and post-secondary exams, tests have all been standardized. While it may seem like the most logical way of evaluating students, the problem with these tests is the way that students are now being prepared for them and what the scores are being used to measure. For...
    939 Words | 3 Pages
  • Standardized Testing Is Equal for All?
    Alexandra Montenegro Professor Anderson English 100 June 8, 2013 Standardized Testing is Equal for All? Standardized testing had been made mandatory for each state in the United States since the early 1900’s. It was said that these multiple choice exams were a fair way to measure the student’s general knowledge gained during the school year and to confirm that the schools and teachers are teaching their students the adequate information required. Although this may sound as if it were a...
    1,047 Words | 3 Pages
  • Flaws of Standardized Testing - 1163 Words
    As a Senior applying to colleges, I have taken both the ACT and SAT multiple times. And I hate them. And it's not just because I have to get up early on a Saturday morning. But whoever created these tests surely isn't a teenager who loves their sleep. But that's beside the point. In today's society, they have become too important of a factor in the college admission process. They have the potential to be the only thing that prevents one from getting into a school of their dreams....
    1,163 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Standardized Testing Craze - 2417 Words
    Standardized Tests Sections I and II Brittany, an honors student in Atlanta, Georgia, had worked hard her entire academic career to celebrate what would be her proudest moment in high school: commencement. She wanted to walk across the stage to the flash of cameras and smiles of her family just like her classmates, and then journey off to a college in South Carolina where she had already been accepted. So she gathered her proud family members from Chicago and Washington, D.C., to come to share...
    2,417 Words | 7 Pages
  • The Unintended Consequences of Standardized Testing
    The Unintended Consequences of High Stakes Testing Since the beginning of the 20th century some form of high stakes standardized testing has existed in the United States. Test use has ranged from determining acceptance or rejection of an immigrant to enter the U.S. to declaring a citizen competent to enter the military. So, for nearly a century, high stakes testing has had significant rewards and consequences associated with it. Standardized testing of student comprehension and competency has...
    1,144 Words | 3 Pages
  • An Argument on Standardized Testing - 840 Words
    Standardized tests are now a common practice among America’s schools. This has caused one of the most controversial debates in society today. Supposedly, they are a great way to measure student achievement, but it appears that the exams could be much more detrimental than they seem. Students are failing to pass year-long classes due to a single test. There is no way that the information learned within such an amount of time can be accurately or even fairly assessed this way. Within every...
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  • Problems with Standardized Testing
    Gina Mancini Mrs. Sprague Honors English 12 December 19, 2011 The Tests That Can Determine an Entire Future Albert Einstein once said, "It is the supreme art of the teacher to awaken joy in creative expression and knowledge." How, though, may teachers follow these wise words, when they must constantly worry about educating their students so they can pass just one of the many standardized tests thrust upon them? John Dewey, an American philosopher, also said, "The real process of...
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  • Standardized Testing Failing Students
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  • Downfalls of Standardized Testing - 2017 Words
    Downfalls of Standardized Testing In January of 2002, President George W. Bush signed the No Child Left Behind Act into law. This act required that each state develop standardized tests for basic skills and administer the tests to all students in order to receive federal funding for their school. Each state was required to set progress goals, and each school in the state must make adequate yearly progress, meaning that each year, the current students must perform better on the test than...
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  • Inefficiency of Standardized Testing - 867 Words
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  • Why Iq Tests Don't Test Intelligence
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  • The Evolution of Standardized Testing and Its Divided Opinions
    What is standardized testing? It is a type of test that is used to signify objective tests that include questions such as fill in the blank, multiple-choice, true/false, or short essay. All students take the same tests with the same questions so that the scores can be compared. Computers score most parts of these tests. People that have rubrics with guidelines on how to score the answers grade questions like fill in the blank and short essay answers. The results of these tests deliver two types...
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  • Usefulness of Standardized Testing in Elementary Schools
    Standardized tests are designed to be given under specified and controlled conditions and are used to compare the abilities and skills of students from different regions. They are also used to determine the knowledge a student has acquired over a certain period of time. Additionally, government officials use standardized tests to determine the amount of funding that a school receives each year. Although these tests evaluate school performance and student education well, they contain a bias and...
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  • Research Paper over Standardized Testing
    Catherine Burgess 1 Burgess 1 Mrs. Edmonds English 3 AP 2/20/2013 Standardized Testing The current period of learning is being determined by standardized testing, and has become the main focus of many arguments within the education system. Students all over the United States are being subjected to standardized tests often throughout their years in school due to legislation that has been set by Government over the past several years. While there are many upsides to the...
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  • Standardized Testing as a Means of College Entry
    Began in the 1920s the SAT was the first ever use of a standardized test to determine entrance into a college (Pacenza). The SAT was originally developed to keep the upper-class from being the only ones to attend college. College professors at Harvard did not like the fact that only the elite attended their college; they wanted the smartest students from across the country to attend Harvard and thus the SAT was formed as a means to test the ability of said students. Since then the SAT has gone...
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  • Motivational Effects of Test Score
    I feel that the author is trying to say some students aren’t motivated enough when it comes to standardized test. Walberg and Brown think that if you motivate students enough they will do better on standardized test. One of the things I notice when reading this article is they motivated the students right before the test. So they are testing the effect of a little bit of motivation. I think the author did a logical study. I feel that the author she have also mention academic levels of each...
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  • Iq Test Paper - 503 Words
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  • Usage of Psychometric Test in Corporate
    Usage of Psychometric Test in Corporate Introduction: In today’s world Psychometric tests are widely used tool in corporate. They are used for various purposes and there are different types of test which are used in companies. In psychometric tests there are different things which can be measured. They are Intelligence quotient, emotional quotient, personality traits, aptitude etc. These tests are used as per company’s needs. In organizations these tests are used according to the...
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  • College Admisstion Test - 1156 Words
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  • How Tests Affect the Student
     Students all over the nation are experiencing delays to learning. Whether children are poor or in low class families, have low school funding, are being discriminated against because of their standardized test scores, or are being tracked throughout their entire school career, they are not getting the best education they possibly can. A lot of schools are having difficulty with the No Child Left Behind law because it forces students who have learning disabilities and English as a second...
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  • Test Generator: Introduction and Overview
    CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION A. Background of the Study Generator has many meanings. However, this study’s definiton of generator is a program or software that generates something, in this case, tests, patterns and even format. Test generators can help you create your tests. With test generators, you can create multiple-choice and single choice questions all on the same test. You can also add images in question, scenario, choices and explanations varying on the type of test generatos used....
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  • Turner Test Prep Co.
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  • Philippines: The National Achievement Test
    INTRODUCTION To assess and monitor the quality of basic education in the Philippines, achievement tests were administered to public schools both elementary and secondary. These achievement tests include National Achievement Test (NAT), Regional Achievement Test (RAT) and Division Achievement Test (DAT). Of these three achievements tests, the NAT is the main criterion of the school performance. Meanwhile, the RAT and DAT served as preparatory assessment procedures to be able the school to...
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  • Types of Assessment Test - 3578 Words
    Types of Assessment Tests 1) Develop a chart (matrix) of 1000−1,250 words that compares and contrasts the different types of assessments, the characteristics of each, and for what situations each is best suited. It should address the following: a) How is each type of assessment scored? b) Discuss the value and limitations of each test in determining knowledge and skill standards. c) Analyze each instrument for reliability and validity. 2) APA format is not required, but solid academic...
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  • State Test Persuasive Essay
    Throughout high school you are given many different tests that determine how well you do in certain subjects. High school gives you many challenges to prove that you are ready to graduate and receive a high school diploma. That is why I feel that giving a standardize test is an unfair way to determine a student’s graduation. Many students can get test anxiety and score low on a subject that they normally do every day. Graduated shouldn’t be set on one certain test because there are many...
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  • Does Standardized Testing Hurt Students
    “A hopeful America is one in which not one child is left behind.” This quote from President George W. Bush at a recent news conference represents the current philosophy of our government on education. In 2001 President Bush signed the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). The new law is an updated version of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) which was signed into law in 1965. Since then standardized testing has been a part of our school system in one form or another, yet there is...
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  • Standardized Testing: Hurting or Helping the Education of Today
    “Standardized Testing: Hurting or Helping the Education of Today?” Standardized testing has been embedded in children from the time they first enter kindergarten all the way through grade school and high school years and finally ending in college and graduate school. It has become so frequent that it is no longer questioned why these tests are necessary, and by the time a person is finally through with school, they have taken an average of twenty to twenty-two tests. Although countless...
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  • Standardized Testing in the Us: Why It Does Not Work
    In the United States, standardized testing is used to measure how knowledgeable or unknowledgeable a person is in a particular subject. According to the Council of Chief State School Officers website, standardized tests are defined as “a testing instrument that is administered, scored, and interpreted in a standard manner. It may be either norm-referenced or criterion-referenced” (Council of Chief State School Officers). I believe that this method of testing is not an accurate way of measuring...
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  • Standardized Testing: Putting Quality Assessment Practices at Risk
    In the article ‘The Test That Won’t Go Away’, Scherer states that there have been significant changes in the focus of teaching for testing and the impact this has on learning (Scherer, 2009). Standardized testing is putting quality assessment practises at risk because of the “pressure on students and teachers to improve test results” (Scherer, 2009) rather than focussing on the best practise for quality learning. Firstly, quality assessments must serve a purpose (McMillan, 2011). Teachers...
    477 Words | 2 Pages
  • Psychometric Tests Used in Employee Selection
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  • Should Standardized Testing Be Used In College Admission?
     “Should Standardized testing be used for college admission?” The purpose of standardized testing in high school for admission to college is to see how much you have retained in school in order to be able to do well in college. The reason is to try to prove that standardized testing isn’t the only thing necessary for college admission. What’s needed to learn first about this topic is: how many people agree with standardized testing, viewpoints on whether the upper class if favored in...
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  • Standardized testing: What's wrong with this picture?
    Rough Draft Persuasive Paper Standardized testing: What's wrong with this picture? The ACT: this particular standardized test has many connotations, and few of them are positive ones. When one thinks of the ACT, or American College Testing, feelings of nervousness, pressure to perform well, and the words “rigged,” “biased,” and “tricky” often...
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  • Does the language in standardized testing directed at a cultural or diverse group, limit their performance on standardized testing.
    Running Head: Literature Review Assignment #2 A Literature Review on the Topic of Understanding the impact of standardized testing and its relationship to an achievement gap within a culturally diverse student population. By Horace Hargroves A Paper Presented in Partial Fulfillment Of the Requirements of ED7107 - Teaching & Learning with Diverse Populations Capella University November 7, 2009 1604 Pine Barren Rd Bloomingdale Georgia 31302...
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  • Entrepreneur case study-Turner Test Prep Co.
    Entrepreneur Case 1A Turner Test Prep Co. Introduction In the Spring of 2003, Jessica Turner felt that she had come to a crossroads with her business. As the founder and CEO of Turner Test Prep, a California company specializing in preparing people for the Certified Public accountant (CPA) exam, she felt that she was not achieving market share and growing in the right direction. After three years of providing prep classed to both students and professionals, Turner had about 10 percent of the...
    1,941 Words | 7 Pages
  • Discuss the Role of Criterion Referenced Tests and Norm Referenced Tests in the Teaching and Learning Process
    Discuss the role of criterion referenced tests and norm referenced tests in the teaching and learning process Introduction According to Van der Linden (1982), the rise of new learning strategies has changed the meaning of measurement in education and made new demands on the construction, scoring, and analysis of educational tests. Educational measurements satisfying these demands are usually called criterion-referenced, while traditional measurements are often known as norm-referenced. Thus,...
    2,664 Words | 8 Pages
  • The Large Number of Tests Taken by the Average High School Student
    Totally Too Many Tests Typically, the average high school student graduating in the spring of 2015 in the state of Texas will have taken roughly 35 state-mandated and college entrance exams. Every single one of these tests, including, but not limited to, the SAT, ACT, PSAT/NMSQT, Subject Tests, TAKS, and STAAR exams are considered to be standardized tests. By standardized, these means they were all administered and scored precisely alike, and give an average score. As our society advances...
    1,186 Words | 4 Pages
  • No Child Left Behind act.
    Group Speech Have any of you ever noticed that the schools in poorer areas in which we consider "bad schools" do not seem to get any better? It's all thanks to the No Child Left Behind act. What’s that you ask? We will go into further details later but in short, it is an federal law in which schools within the United States have to average a certain standardized test score in order for their states to received federal educational funding. The idea of this act sounds good, but what happens to...
    666 Words | 2 Pages
  • Persuasive Outline 2014 - 1312 Words
    SAMPLE PERSUASIVE OUTLINE Volunteering in Your Community Specific Purpose: To persuade the members of my audience to volunteer in their local community. Thesis Statement: Volunteering in your local community will help those around you and help you feel like you contributed something positive. Organizational Pattern: Monroe’s Motivated Sequence Introduction (Attention) I. Attention-Getting Device—Has anyone ever stopped to help you when you were in need? How did it make you feel? II....
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