Soil Essays & Research Papers

Best Soil Essays

  • Soil - 1709 Words
     SOIL EROSION Janeen Uy I BS MANAGEMENT ES 10 J Submitted to: Dr. Severino Salmo III March 8, 2012 Soil is found on the Earth's crust and formed through weathering and decay of organisms. It may be considered dirt to a lot of people but it is highly an important tool for our survival. The soil holds the roots of the plants where nutrients are stored. It is important since it enables the soil to store and regulate the flow of water, filters the pollutants and improves the...
    1,709 Words | 5 Pages
  • Soils - 1625 Words
    What is Soil? Soil is the surface of the earth’s crust where plants have their roots and where many small animals make their home. It is also a result of the breakdown of rocks. Formation of Soil Soil is formed when rocks break down into very small particles by various processes such as weathering. There are two types of weathering: Physical Weathering and Chemical Weathering. Physical Weathering arises from the heating and cooling, the wetting and drying, and the freezing...
    1,625 Words | 6 Pages
  • Soil - 344 Words
    SOilIntroduction Soil plays a vital role in our ability to cultivate crops. Throughout human history, our relationship with the soil has affected our ability to cultivate crops and influenced the success of civilizations. This relationship between humans, the earth, and food sources affirms soil as the foundation of agriculture. Soil testing is necessary for knowledge of characteristic of the soil, quantity of fertilizer is needed so that fertilizers are used only as needed, not too less or...
    344 Words | 2 Pages
  • Soil - 1008 Words
    Soil Porosity and Permeability GEO 101 LAB – Earth Science July 26, 2014 Soil Porosity and Permeability The focus of week three’s lab in Earth Science is to figure out the porosity and permeability of four different soil types: gravel, sand, potting soil, and soil from my back yard. This lab is designed to look at the porosity and permeability of these four soil samples. Porosity is basically the measure of how much of the soil volume is open space. Permeability is the measurement of how...
    1,008 Words | 4 Pages
  • All Soil Essays

  • Soil Erosion Soil - 3981 Words
    SOIL Soil is formed at a rate of only 1 cm every 100 to 400 years and it takes 3000 to 12000 years to build enough soil to form productive land. This means that soil is a nonrenewable resource and once destroyed it is gone forever. If we disregard this, a time will come when there would not be enough soil left to sustain life on earth, because the soil is a necessary growth medium for plants, a home for certain insects and animals, as well as a medium from which we get minerals, such as gold....
    3,981 Words | 12 Pages
  • Soil and Soil Components - 814 Words
     Soil and Its Components Research Paper SOIL AND ITS COMPONENTS Soil is everywhere. It is abundant throughout the earth and contains most of the worlds diversity. Soil is full of life. It is actually believed that a handful of soil may consist of more living organisms than there are on this Earth. GENERAL DESCRIPTION Soil is a natural body comprised of solids (minerals and organic matter), liquid, and gases that occurs on the land surface. (Natural Resources Conservation Service,...
    814 Words | 3 Pages
  • Soil Type - 539 Words
    4.10 The Good Earth Pre-Activity Work File Data Table/ Observations: Note: If you are only observing two distinct layers of soil record your observations in the "uppermost" and "bottom" rows of the data table, leaving the "middle layer" row blank. Total ThicknessTop LayerMiddle Layer *If presentBottom LayerWater in Jar (after settling) Determining Soil Type Thickness of Layer (in cm)6.7inches 3inches 2.7inches 1inchAppearance of Water Clear/Cloudy? Color?Very cloudyFor this part of...
    539 Words | 3 Pages
  • Soil Analysis - 387 Words
    Soil Letter to Consumer To Whom it May Concern, I am writing to inform you about the current quality of your soil and what can be done to improve it. The type of soil that you buy is called Sandy Loam. This particular type of soil has a rocky, dry, and chunky texture to it. After a series of multiple tests, we have concluded the following results: Nitrogen: Your tests came back low with nitrogen levels. It is important for soil to contain proper amounts of nitrogen as it is vital to...
    387 Words | 2 Pages
  • Soil Lab - 763 Words
    Name: Raaga Singireddy Mrs. M-K/Science Date: 6/3/2013 Pd. 2 Soil Lab QUESTION: What Soil Recipe will grow the best Pea seed? CLAIM: I believe that soil made up of 30% silt, 25% Water, 15% humus 5% Sand, 5% of Clay, and the assuming the other 25% is air, will grow the best pea seed. MATERIALS 100 Milliliter Dixie Cup Ground Clay _ Silt Water...
    763 Words | 3 Pages
  • Soil and Water - 435 Words
    When I was researching for this essay explaining what soil and water conservation means to me, I found two quotes that really stuck out to me. One written by Franklin D. Roosevelt stated, “A nation that destroys its soils destroys itself. Forests are the lungs of our land, purifying the air and giving fresh strength to our people.”, and another that was written by an unknown author read, “Water is life’s mater and matrix, mother and medium. There is no life without water.” I am not sure about...
    435 Words | 1 Page
  • Sandy Soil - 1300 Words
    Soil is the layer of broken rock particles and decaying organic matter on the surface of earth, which is essential for the growth of plants. It comprises of all the necessary nutrients that aid the growth and development of plants and trees. There are different types of soils, each one of them varying in its nature and texture. While some soils are deep rooted, the others are present on the margin. They also differentiate in their color, as some may be red while others are black. There are...
    1,300 Words | 3 Pages
  • Soil Erosion - 914 Words
    A material of geological and biological origin that is changed by chemical, biological, and physical processes, giving it the ability to support plant growth is defined as soil. Soils come in an almost infinite variety of vertical structures and textures. Most soils are hundreds of years old and change very slowly. The work ability of the soil is the ease in which a soil can be cultivated and is determined by the soil texture. There are distinct layers of soil that are not always visible to eye...
    914 Words | 3 Pages
  • Soil Stabilzation - 955 Words
    CHAPTER – 1 INTRODUCTION 1|Page From the starting of construction work, the imprtotance of enhancing soil properties has come to the light. Ancient civilizations of the Chinese, Indian, Romans and Incas utilized various methods to improve soil strength etc., and these methods were so effective that they are still used in constructing buildings and roads . Here, in this project ,Our whole work revolve around the properties of soil and its stability . Basically for any structure , the...
    955 Words | 5 Pages
  • soil pollution - 9009 Words
    Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety ] (]]]]) ]]]–]]] Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/ecoenv Contamination levels and spatial distribution of organochlorine pesticides in soils from India K. Mishra a,n, Ramesh C. Sharma a, Sudhir Kumar b a b Department of Environmental Sciences, Hemwati Nandan Bahuguna Garhwal University (A Central University), Srinagar Garhwal 246174,...
    9,009 Words | 48 Pages
  • Types of Soil - 303 Words
    TYPES OF SOIL TYPE OF SOIL FORMATION CHEMICAL COMPOSITION AREAS CROPS ALLUVIAL SOIL They are because of deposition of silt brought down by rivers Rich in minerals such as potash, phosphoric acid and lime. These soils also extend in Rajasthan and Gujarat. Found in the deltas of Mahanadi, Kaveri, Krishna, Godavari rivers hence are called deltaic soil. Wheat Types of alluvial soil :khaddar ,banger Coarse soils are common in Chos, Duars and Terai BLACK SOIL Formed by weathering of...
    303 Words | 2 Pages
  • Soil Pollution and Soil Waste Management
    Soil is an important natural resource that covers much of the earth's land surface. All life on earth depends on the soil as a direct or indirect source of food. Plants are rooted in the soil and obtain nutrients (nourishing substances) from it. Animals get nutrients from plants or from animals that eat plants. Certain microbes in the soil cause dead organisms to decay, which helps return nutrients to the soil. In addition, many kinds of animals find shelter in the soil. Soil contains...
    1,124 Words | 4 Pages
  • Soil Particles - 2594 Words
    SOIL Soil consists of three layers – topsoil, which is the surface layer, a middle region called subsoil and a solid rock interior. Topsoil consists of soil particles of varying sizes. It is a few centimeters deep and is occupied by plant roots and other living organisms. This layer is dark in colour because it contains humus, the brown organic substance formed by the decay of plant and animal matter. Topsoil also contains many chemical substances that plants need. Below the topsoil is a wider...
    2,594 Words | 8 Pages
  • Soil Analyses - 1493 Words
    Soil Analyses College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Revised 10/11 AZ1412 This publication provides information on techniques of soil sampling and analysis for horticulture and agriculture. Soils are sampled to determine physical conditions, fertility (nutrient) status, and chemical properties that affect their suitability as plant growing media. Through a combination of field and greenhouse research, analytical methods have been developed which provide quantitative estimates of...
    1,493 Words | 4 Pages
  • Soil Mechanics - 30881 Words
    Soil Mechanics: Subsurface Exploration Course No: G08-001 Credit: 8 PDH Yun Zhou, PhD, PE Continuing Education and Development, Inc. 9 Greyridge Farm Court Stony Point, NY 10980 P: (877) 322-5800 F: (877) 322-4774 info@cedengineering.com U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration Publication No. FHWA NHI-06-088 December 2006 NHI Course No. 132012_______________________________ SOILS AND FOUNDATIONS Reference Manual – Volume I Testing Theory...
    30,881 Words | 108 Pages
  • Types of Soil - 819 Words
    A soil horizon is a layer parallel to the soil surface, whose physical characteristics differ from the layers above and beneath. Each soil type has at least one, usually three or four horizons. Horizons are defined in most cases by obvious physical features, chiefly colour and texture. These may be described both in absolute terms (particle size distribution for texture, for instance) and in terms relative to the surrounding material, i.e. ‘coarser’ or ‘sandier’ than the horizons above and...
    819 Words | 3 Pages
  • Soil Types - 1161 Words
    Podzols In soil science, podzols (also known as podsols or Spodosols) are the typical soils of coniferous or boreal forests. They are also the typical soils of eucalypt forests and headlands in southern Australia. The name Podzol is derived from the Russian words pod = under and zola = ash. Characteristics of Podzol soils - Deep organic layer comprising L (litter), F (fermenting organic matter) and H (humus) forest, less under moorland - An ash-grey, structure less, silica rich E or...
    1,161 Words | 4 Pages
  • Soil Pollution - 918 Words
    Soil Soil is a natural body consisting of layers (soil horizons) of mineral constituents of variable thicknesses, which differ from the parent materials in their morphological, physical, chemical, and mineralogical characteristics.[1] Soil is composed of particles of broken rock that have been altered by chemical and environmental processes that include weathering and erosion. Soil differs from its parent rock due to interactions between the lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and the...
    918 Words | 3 Pages
  • Soil Diversity - 721 Words
    Eco L: Soil Diversity Introduction Soil is an ecological system consisting of inorganic minerals (sand, silt, clay, and nutrients), pore spaces, water, gases, organic matter, living organisms, and plants (Thien, 2002). The soil is said to be stable structurally and chemically thus is considered an outstanding medium for soil organisms such as bacteria, fungi, protozoa, nematodes, arthropods, and earthworms. The potential habitats of these soil invertebrates are the spaces within the...
    721 Words | 3 Pages
  • Soil and Glaciers - 630 Words
    Soil and Glaciers Worksheet From Visualizing Earth Science, by Merali, Z., and Skinner, B. J, 2009, Hoboken, NJ: Wiley. Copyright 2009 by Wiley. Adapted with permission. Part 1 Size grades of soil are named sand, silt, and clay, which includes colloids. Size grades are defined using the metric system. Use Figure 4.8 from the textbook to fill in the following chart. Specify the type and size and description of the particle. In some cases, particle size will be less than some value or...
    630 Words | 3 Pages
  • Soil Creation - 747 Words
    Q1. You are asked to create soil that would be considered very fertile. What would you include in your "recipe?" I would try to create a soil order all of my own, combining Inceptisols and Mollisols unique characteristics. My terrain for my soil to be placed would be on a mostly flat to gently sloping surface to provide good drainage, minimum erosion, and sufficient time for nutrients to drain into the soil. My “O” soil horizon will be mostly compost made from fallen leaves and other organic...
    747 Words | 2 Pages
  • Soil Erosion - 403 Words
    Kenneth R. Sagum May 7, 2013 FR1 NATSCI1 “Effects of Soil Erosion in the Philippines” The soil is among our most precious resources, yet we often take it for granted or destroy it by making it susceptible to soil erosion. In the Philippines, for example, 22 provinces had been reported to have "alarming" soil erosion rate. Among those that had been losing their topsoil were Cebu, Batangas, Marinduque, Ilocos Sur, and La Union. This means that 58 per cent of the country's...
    403 Words | 2 Pages
  • Soil Conservation - 788 Words
    Soil, which is one of the most important natural resources, is often less heeded. The importance of soil conservation is relatively less talked about as compared to the conservation of water and other natural resources. The almost-omnipresent soil is mostly taken for granted. Its omnipresence is ironically the reason behind us, human beings, taking it for a ride. We rarely even think of it as a natural resource that needs to be conserved, a part of the natural wealth that needs to be preserved....
    788 Words | 3 Pages
  • Soil Mechanics - 17820 Words
    Soil Fundamentals CONTENTS Part 1 Soil Mechanics What Is Soil? ...................................................................page 1 Soil Groups .....................................................................page 1 Grain Size Limits.............................................................page 2 Soil Properties and Characteristics...................................page 2 Soil Analysis ....................................................................page 7 Moisture...
    17,820 Words | 62 Pages
  • Soil Pollution - 1710 Words
    What Is Soil Pollution? Soil pollution comprises the toxic waste of soils with resources, mostly chemicals that are out of place or are present at concentrations advanced than normal which may have unpleasant effects on humans or other organisms. However, soil pollution is also caused by resources other than the undeviating addition of man-made chemicals such as undeveloped runoff waters, industrial waste materials, acidic precipitates, and radioactive clash. Both organic and inorganic...
    1,710 Words | 5 Pages
  • Fruit and Soil - 8067 Words
    Classification of tropical, sub-tropical and acid zone fruit – area and production – scope and importance. Climate is of fundamental importance in the development of fruit cluster. Fruit has been a major food for mankind from time immemorial. Primitive man, the food habit was based mainly on fruits and also tubers which were found wild in the forests. In fact Adam who is considered to be the progenitor of man was said to have temptingly given the apple. In Ramanaya and Mahabaratha the...
    8,067 Words | 34 Pages
  • The Soil Erosion - 641 Words
    While the nature takes from 100 to 400 years to build one centimetre of top soil, man can and often does destroy it almost overnight by haphazard land use and improvident husbandry. Irrational methods of cultivation, deforestation, destruction of natural vegetation due to over­grazing by pasturing animals etc., accelerate denudation. Besides, failure of rains, floods, depopulation and loss of cattle caused by famine and pestilence, disturbance caused by war and interference with or...
    641 Words | 3 Pages
  • Soil Erosion - 338 Words
    Soil Erosion Erosion is a natural process by which rock and soil are broken loose from the earth’s surface at one location and moved to another. Soil erosion forms and changes land by wearing down mountains filling valleys, and making rivers appear and disappear. Erosion is usually a slow and gradual process that occurs over the course of thousands or millions of years. However the rate of erosion can be speeded up by such human activities as mining. How erosion occurs? Ero0sion begins with...
    338 Words | 1 Page
  • Soil Erosion - 6960 Words
    What is soil erosion? Soil erosion is a natural process, occurring over geological time, and indeed it is a process that is essential for soil formation in the first place. With respect to soil degradation, most concerns about erosion are related to accelerated erosion, where the natural rate has been significantly increased mostly by human activity. Soil erosion by water is a widespread problem throughout Europe. Soil is naturally removed by the action of water or wind: such...
    6,960 Words | 21 Pages
  • Soil Compaction - 9879 Words
    FM 5-410 CHAPTER 8 Soil Compaction Soil compaction is one of the most critical components in the construction of roads, airfields, embankments, and foundations. The durability and stability of a structure are related to the achievement of proper soil compaction. Structural failure of roads and airfields and the damage caused by foundation settlement can often be traced back to the failure to achieve proper soil compaction. Compaction is the process of mechanically densifying a soil....
    9,879 Words | 28 Pages
  • Soil Degridation - 296 Words
    Soil Degradation The damaging process of soil particles being moved and cycled by water or wind is known as erosion. Soil erosion can occur anytime soil is bare or exposed and naturally removed by wind or water. This form of soil degradation is a natural process but it further elevated by human activity. Human disturbances of the soil allow for this process to happen more rapidly under natural conditions. According to the University of Michigan, whose geologist conducted a study, human...
    296 Words | 1 Page
  • Soil Erosion - 1326 Words
    Soil erosion Soil erosion occurs when soil is removed through the action of wind and water at a greater rate than it is formed SOIL The soil covering the surface of the earth has taken millions of years to form and we must learn to respect it. Soil is formed at a rate of only 1 cm every 100 to 400 years and it takes 3 000 to 12 000 years to build enough soil to form productive land. This means that soil is a nonrenewable resource and once destroyed it is gone forever. If we disregard this,...
    1,326 Words | 5 Pages
  • Soil Report - 388 Words
    Dulce Romo October 20, 2014 1st Period Mr.MayesSoil Texture Lab Report Introduction Soil texture is one of the most important physical properties of soils. Soil texture is related to a number of important soil characteristics such as water holding capacity, soil drainage, and soil fertility. In order to make this lab work to our own convenience we will use soil from our nearby area. This project was conducted to specify what type of soil there is in the area and what it can be used for....
    388 Words | 2 Pages
  • Peat Soil - 297 Words
    INTRODUCTION Peat is a mixture of fragmented organic material formed in wetlands under appropriate climatic and topographic conditions and it is derived from vegetation that has been chemically changed and fossilized. Peat is partially or totally decomposed remains of dead plants which have accumulated under water for tens to thousands of year. Decomposition or humification involves the loss of organic matter either in gas or in solution, the disappearance of physical structure and the...
    297 Words | 1 Page
  • Soil Pollution - 418 Words
    Soil Pollution The process of contamination of the land surface of the earth is referred to as land pollution. It results from human activities that cause imbalance in nature. Dumping human and industrial waste harmful agricultural practices and exposing the land to harmful chemicals leads to the pollution of land. We speak of water and air pollution and rarely even think of the adverse effects of land pollution. Let me share with you some of the important facts about land pollution....
    418 Words | 2 Pages
  • Soil Salinity - 664 Words
    Soil salinity Soil salinity is the salt content in the soil; the process of increasing the salt content is known as salination. Salt is a natural element of soils and water. Salination can be caused by natural processes such as mineral weathering or the gradual withdrawal of an ocean. It can also be caused by artificial processes such as irrigation. |Contents | |1 Causes of soil salinity | |2 Natural occurrence...
    664 Words | 3 Pages
  • soil nailing - 1247 Words
    SOIL NAILING INTRODUCTION: Since its development in Europe in the early 1970s, soil nailing has become a widely accepted method of providing temporary and permanent earth support, underpinning and slope stabilization on many civil projects in the United States. In the early years, soil nailing was typically performed only on projects where specialty geotechnical contractors offered it as an alternate to other, conventional systems. More recently, soil nailing has been specified as the...
    1,247 Words | 4 Pages
  • Soil and Trees - 586 Words
    Below is a free essay on "trees our best friends" from Anti Essays, your source for free research papers, essays, and term paper examples. A friend always does a good to us even if we do harm to him. Similarly, tree gives us fruits when we throw stones at it. So a tree is our friend. All our food comes directly or indirectly from trees. Food grains, cereals, vegetables and fruits are supplied by trees. Even non-vegetarian food comes indirectly from trees, because animal live on grass, and...
    586 Words | 2 Pages
  • soil conservation - 2107 Words
     Soil conservation includes all such measures which protect the soil from erosion and restore its fertility. These measures are of two types-(a) small measures to check soil erosion at local or even individual level, and (b) large measures at govern­ment level involving larger area and heavy invest­ment. (a) Small Measures-These include afforesta­tion, regularised land strip cultivation or contour farming or terrace farming in hilly areas, use of stubble mulch system, increasing...
    2,107 Words | 7 Pages
  • Soil Erosion - 2383 Words
    Detailed Lesson Plan in Science IV (Soil Erosion) I. Learning Objectives a. Identify the agents of soil erosion. b. Explain how each agents cause erosion. c. Perform related activities enhancing knowledge about soil erosion. d. Enumerate ways and means on how to help prevent soil erosion. II. Subject Matter a. Topic: Soil Erosion b. References: c. Concepts: Soil Erosion and its Effects d. Sciences Processes: Observation, Experimenting, Analysing e. Materials: 2...
    2,383 Words | 7 Pages
  • permeability of soil - 419 Words
    Title L6 – Soil Permeability – Constant Head Test Introduction Permeability is measured in term of water flow through the soil in a given time. The soil permeability is a very important factor to study the behavior of soil in its natural condition with respect to water flow. The size of pore space and interconnectivity of the spaces help determine permeability, so shape and arrangement of grains play a role. Often the term hydraulic conductivity is used when discussing groundwater...
    419 Words | 2 Pages
  • Soil Conservation - 4629 Words
    INTRODUCTION Soil is the precious gift of nature to the mankind. All the plant family, animal kingdom and human society at large depend upon soil for their sustenance directly or indirectly. Ironically, soil is the most neglected commodity on the earth. Shifting cultivation on the hill slopes, non-adoption of soil conservation techniques, and over exploitation of land for crop production due to population stress, leads to enormous soil erosion. It will take hundreds of years to form an inch...
    4,629 Words | 15 Pages
  • Soil Erosion - 555 Words
    Soil Erosion Introduction: Each year deserts consume an area the size of Belgium. Worldwide, farmers are losing 24 billion tonnes of topsoil each year. The effects of soil erosion include deteriorating the agricultural sector, flooding and impairing aquatic habitats. Deteriorating the Agricultural Sector: Soil erosion has arguably the greatest impact on the agricultural sector. The part which is removed during soil erosion is the topsoil. Topsoil contains the majority of the...
    555 Words | 2 Pages
  • Soil Permability - 839 Words
    GEO101L Earth Science Module 3 Lab: Soil Porosity and Permeability Soils are made up of particles of rock, along with the spaces between those particles. Physical characteristics of soil particles, such as size and shape, can influence how water moves through them. Aquifers are underground layers of rock that are capable of storing water. An aquifer is recharged when water filters through the soil levels above it. In this lab you will investigate the characteristics of known and unknown...
    839 Words | 4 Pages
  • soil erosion - 902 Words
    Soil erosion This is the loss of topsoil by wind and water. It is a natural process, happening all the time, but usually slowly because of the protective covering of vegetation. New soil formation from weathering of surface rocks can generally keep pace and replace what is being lost. Rates of soil erosion are highest in dry climates where there is little surface vegetation to shelter the soil against wind, or on steep slopes in wet climates where the gradient increases the speed of surface...
    902 Words | 3 Pages
  • SOIL MECHANICS - 4122 Words
    PHYSICAL AND PLASTICITY CHARACTERISTICS EXPERIMENTS #1 - 5 CE 3143 October 7, 2003 Group A David Bennett 0 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. Experiment # 1: Determination of Water Content (August 26, 2003) pp. 1-3 2. Experiment # 2: Determination of Specific Gravity of Soil (Sept. 2, 2003) pp. 4-7 3. Experiment # 3: Grain Size Analysis: Sieve Analysis (Sept. 9, 2003) pp. 8-12 4. Experiment # 4: Grain Size Analysis: Hydrometer Analysis (Sept. 16, 2003) pp. 13-18 5....
    4,122 Words | 49 Pages
  • Soil Profile - 589 Words
    Abstract The assignment is to compare and contrast 4 soil profile from field observation. ------------------------------------------------- Geography Assignment ------------------------------------------------- Soil Profile Geography Assignment Title: Soil Profile Aim: To Compare and contrast 4 soil profile to each other and also to the true soil profile. Date:12th October 2012 Introduction Soil is a natural body of animal, mineral and organic constituents...
    589 Words | 3 Pages
  • Soil Formation - 275 Words
    Soil formation, or pedogenesis, is the combined effect of physical, chemical, biological and anthropogenic processes on soil parent material. Soil is said to be formed when organic matter has accumulated and colloids washed downward, leaving deposits of clay, humus, iron oxide, carbonate, and gypsum. As a result, horizons form in the soil profile. These constituents are moved (translocated) from one level to another by water and animal activity. The alteration and movement of materials within a...
    275 Words | 1 Page
  • SOIL CONSERVATION - 567 Words
    SOIL CONSERVATION The aim of soil conservation is the prevention of soil erosion so that the fertile topsoil is retained. There are a lot of methods that can be used to conserve the soil. These are: *Mechanical methods: The main strategy used in mountainous areas is terracing. Terraces built across slopes hold the soil on flatter land. These are mainly needed in tropical lands were rain falls in heavy storms, capable of removing large amounts of soil on slopes. On a smaller scale are...
    567 Words | 2 Pages
  • Layers of Soil. - 578 Words
    In American Samoa, digging a pit is no simple task to undertake, particularly for a group of students with nothing but a shovel. The soil here is hard and compact, full of pebbles and lava rocks. Attempting to dig a pit would have been toilsome and ultimately fruitless. Fortunately, while on a fieldtrip, my classmates and I came upon an archaeological dig site. It was basically a big pit, about five feet deep, that was perfect for our observations. There were obvious changes in the soil through...
    578 Words | 2 Pages
  • Soil Testing - 1248 Words
    Determining the Plastic Limit and Plasticity Index of Soil (Referenced Document: ASTM D 4318) OBJECTIVE: To determine the plastic limit and plasticity index of soil. APPARATUS AND SUPPLIES Evaporating dish Spatula Ground-glass plate—at least 30 cm (12 in.) square by 1 cm (3⁄8 in.) thick for mixing soil and rolling plastic limit threads Balance (with accuracy to 0.01 g) Containers Oven PREPARATION OF TEST SPECIMEN Select a 20-g portion of soil from the material prepared for...
    1,248 Words | 6 Pages
  • Types of Soil - 605 Words
    Types of Soil & Their Uses Soil is a complex system of organic and inorganic matter that directly and indirectly supports plant and animal life. It is comprised of minerals, nutrients, water, microorganisms and decomposed living matter that provide the essential elements required to sustain growth. The soils of different geographical areas differ in chemical makeup, structure, pH value, texture and color. Soil makes the basis of the ecosystem and performs functions essential for the...
    605 Words | 2 Pages
  • Classification of Soils - 536 Words
    Classification of Soils If organic matter, which is present only in small quantities in most locations, is ignored, the earth’s crust consists mainly of mineral (i.e., inorganic, noncombustible) matter. The earth’s mineral matter is generally classified as rocks and soils. In rocks, the mineral particles are firmly bonded together. Soil consists of either individual particles or a conglomerate of several easily separable particles that have resulted from the weathering of rocks. In most...
    536 Words | 2 Pages
  • 1957 and Soil - 1449 Words
    Pennsylvania State University Berks Campus Reading, Pennsylvania SOILS 101 - Introductory Soils Spring 2013 Course Description: SOILS 101 (GN) Introductory Soils (3 credits). A study of soil properties and processes and relationships to land use, plant growth, environmental quality, and society. Overview: This survey and foundational course introduces students to a broad range of subject matter from most sub-disciplines of soil science. The students study a range of soil...
    1,449 Words | 14 Pages
  • Properties of Soil - 1226 Words
    Soil properties Soil depth Soil texture Structure Colour Soil pH level Nutrients Dispersibility Soil organic matter and soil carbon sequestration Permeability and porosity Water holding capacity Soils vary in their suitability for specific purposes. For example, in Queensland a deep, fertile clay soil is suitable for intensive agriculture but a shallow, sandy soil is better suited to grazing and growing native trees. The suitability of a soil for a particular purpose can often be...
    1,226 Words | 5 Pages
  • Soil Stabilization - 1292 Words
    Soil Stabilization Soil stabilization is the permanent physical and chemical alteration of soils to enhance their physical properties. Stabilization can increase the shear strength of a soil and/or control the shrink-swell properties of a soil, thus improving the load bearing capacity of a sub-grade to support pavements and foundations. Stabilization can be used to treat a wide range of sub-grade materials from expansive clays to granular materials. Stabilization can be achieved with a variety...
    1,292 Words | 5 Pages
  • Soil Erosion - 482 Words
    Individual Assignment Cheyanna Ruttschaw EVS 1001-11 Everest Online There are three major causes of soil erosion: overgrazing, over cultivation, and deforestation. Together, these three problems cause more problems by creating unsustainable societies. Luckily, overgrazing, over cultivation, and deforestation can be fixed and the unsustainable society becomes a sustainable one. Overgrazing is when there are more animals in comparison to land, meaning that there isn’t as much food for...
    482 Words | 2 Pages
  • Alkaline Soil - 730 Words
    Alkaline soil is referred to by some gardeners as”sweet soil”. The pH level of alkaline soil is above 7, and it usually contains a great deal of sodium,calcium and magnesium. (1) Alkaline soil occurs in areas with high limestone content, easy souble phosphorus and calcium binding, formation of insouble calcium salts of phosphorus, reducing the effectiveness of phosphorus. Also, in calcareous soils, boron, manganese, molydenum, zinc, iron greatly reduces the effectiveness of the crop often feel...
    730 Words | 3 Pages
  • Soil Lab - 988 Words
    Ohene Akuoko 10/24/12 Soil and Environment Classification of Soil based on Sedimentation Rates Introduction Soil is a naturally occurring substance covering the upper level of Earth’s Continental Crust which sits upon Earth’s highest layer of geological area the lithosphere. Soil is actually nothing more but the remnants of the Earth’s Mountains and the life that has lived on this planet through the natural process of erosion and time on Earth. A good soil is said to be composed of 5 %...
    988 Words | 3 Pages
  • Soil Erosion - 1807 Words
    Soil erosion is a major concern in the southeastern region of Nigeria due to high population densities and farming techniques, which has resulted in the presence of numerous gullies. While gullies are found all around the world, the existence of gullies in Nigeria is regarded as one of the worst environment disasters, having negative implications on the environment and the quality of life for humans and other species (Adetona & Ezezika, 2011; Ajaegwu & al, 2010). Large quantities of soil in...
    1,807 Words | 5 Pages
  • soil pollution - 2512 Words
    SOIL POLLUTION Definition: Soil pollution is defined as the build-up in soils of persistent toxic compounds, chemicals, salts, radioactive materials, or disease causing agents, which have adverse effects on plant growth and animal health. Soil is the thin layer of organic and inorganic materials that covers the Earth's rocky surface. The organic portion, which is derived from the decayed remains of plants and animals, is concentrated in the dark uppermost topsoil. The inorganic portion...
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  • Soil Formation - 251 Words
    Soil formation Pedogenesis or soil evolution (formation) is the process by which soil is created.[1] It is the major topic of the science of pedology, whose other aspects include the soil morphology, classification (taxonomy) of soils, and their distribution in nature, present and past (soil geography and paleopedology). Climate Climate regulates soil formation. Soils are more developed in areas with higher rainfall and more warmth. The rate of chemical weathering increases by 2-3 times...
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  • Soil Types - 1552 Words
    Soil is an integral part of land wealth. It has a great importance in day-to-day human life. Agricultural products depend on fertility of soil. Fertile soil and more food production influence the density of population. The uppermost layer of the earth's crust is more deniable and the rocks of this layer turn into small particles as a result of denudation and weathering. These small particles mingle with various organic and inorganic materials and by chemical actions turn into soil. So the...
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  • How Soil Management Can Affect Soil Quality
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  • Phosphorus in Soil: Plant Nutrients and Soil pH
    Figure 1. Nutrient availability and microbial activity as affected by soil pH; the wider the band, the greater the availability or activity. (Adapted from Truog, USDA Yearbook of Agriculture 1943-1047) Rosen, C. et al. Soil pH Modification. 2004. Soil Test Interpretations and Fertilizer Management for Lawns, Turf, Gardens, and Landscape Plants.http://www.extension.umn.edu/distribution/horticulture/components/1731-03.html. University of Minnesota. (accessed January 15, 2008). Nitrogen One...
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  • CHALK AS SOIL NEUTRALIZER - 1650 Words
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  • Soil and Organic Matter - 743 Words
    Lab Report Using Gravitational Force as a Measurement Tool Answer the following questions about the results of this activity. Record your answers in the boxes. Send your completed lab report to your instructor. Don’t forget to save your lab report to your computer! Activity 1 Record your data from Activity 1 in the boxes below. Enter the data for the sample you used in each trial (5000 rpm, 10000 rpm, etc…) in the appropriate columns and the corresponding g-force, number of layers, and...
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  • Craigs Soil Mechanics - 143827 Words
    Craig’s Soil Mechanics Craig’s Soil Mechanics Seventh edition R.F. Craig Formerly Department of Civil Engineering University of Dundee UK First published 1974 by E & FN Spon, an imprint of Chapman & Hall Second edition 1978 Third edition 1983 Fourth edition 1987 Fifth edition 1992 Sixth edition 1997 Seventh edition 2004 11 New Fetter Lane, London EC4P 4EE Simultaneously published in the USA and Canada by Spon Press 29 West 35th Street, New York, NY 10001 This edition published...
    143,827 Words | 435 Pages
  • Clay Soil Testing - 1710 Words
    Natural Water Content (NZS 4402 Test 2.1) Mass of water: M2- M3=7.05g Mass of dried soil: M3- M1=23.20g Wn=30.4% (3sf-in compliance with NZS 4402) Wn=30% (to nearest whole number) All guidelines within the NZS 4402 methodology were adhered to as closely as possible: The tin base and lid were both cleaned and dried prior to weighing (to the nearest 0.01g), while handling the soil, dry, clean hands we ensured in order to avoid altering the water content of the soil and it was also stored...
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  • Soil and General Term Landslides
    LANDSLIDES Introduction The term ‘landslide’ includes all varieties of mass movements of hill slopes and can be defined as the downward and outward movement of slope forming materials composed of rocks, soils, artificial fills or combination of all these materials along surfaces of separation by falling, sliding and flowing, either slowly or quickly from one place to another. Although the landslides are primarily associated with mountainous terrains, these can also occur in areas where an...
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  • Soil Profile Description - 2694 Words
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    2,694 Words | 13 Pages
  • Soil and Land Resources of the Bahamas
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  • Watershed Management and Soil Erosion
    Watershed Management and Soil Erosion Forests provide a buffer to filter water and to hold soil in place. They sustain water and soil resources through recycling nutrients. In watersheds where forests are degraded or destroyed, minimum flows decrease during the dry season, leading to drought, while peak floods and soil erosion increase during the wet season. Flooding along the Baram River in Sarawak has increased significantly since logging began, the major floods occurring in 1979 and...
    638 Words | 2 Pages
  • Marine and Lacustrine Soil Types
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    2,127 Words | 9 Pages
  • Factors of Soil Formation - 1448 Words
    Next to water and air, soil is most essential to our very existence on the earth. Soils are the basis of support for most life, and a source of nutrients for marine life and fresh water. As a natural resource, soil is of immense value to man. In the agricultural orient the distribution and density of population have conformed to the persisting patterns of soil fertility and productivity. Soil is basically broken-down rock materials and consists of decomposed rock debris and decayed organic...
    1,448 Words | 6 Pages
  • Geography: Soil Conservation - 2115 Words
    GEOGRAPHY WORK SHEET-1 SOILS IN INDIA 1. Name two states in India where Regur soil is found. In what way Regur soil help agriculture? 2. Name the process by which Laterite soil is formed. What climatic conditions are responsible for its formation?Mention 5 main characteristics of Laterite siol. 3. Name two important agents of soil erosion. For each, state two methods of controlling the erosion caused. 4. What is soil conservation? How does reforestation...
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  • 3d Soil Compaction Measurement
    Sensors 2008, 8, 3447-3459; DOI: 10.3390/s8053447 OPEN ACCESS sensors ISSN 1424-8220 www.mdpi.org/sensors Article Sensing and 3D Mapping of Soil Compaction Yücel Tekin 1,*, Basri Kul 1 and Rasim Okursoy 2 1 Uludağ University, Vocational School of Technical Sciences, 16059 Görükle Campus, Bursa – Turkey; E-mail: basrikul@uludag.edu.tr 2 Uludağ University, Faculty of Agriculture, Department of Agricultural Machinery, 16059 Görükle Campus, Bursa – Turkey; E-mail: okursoy@uludag.edu.tr *...
    4,659 Words | 17 Pages
  • Soil Management in Konkan - 3415 Words
    Soil Management in Konkan Introduction to soil management Soil is non renewable natural resource which supports life on earth. It needs to be managed successfully to support sustainable development. It is growing in economic importance because of a broader environmental agenda. Poor soil management in many regions, including parts Konkan and western Maharashtra, has progressively degraded productive soils. This is putting our food security at risk in the context of a growing and increasingly...
    3,415 Words | 12 Pages
  • The Soil Forming Factors - 547 Words
    These soil forming factors continue to affect soils even on "stable" landscapes. Materials are deposited on their surface, and materials are blown or washed away from the surface. Additions, removals, and alterations are slow or rapid, depending on climate, landscape position, and biological activity. Parent material. Few soils weather directly from the underlying rock . These "residual" soils have the same general chemistry as the original rocks. More commonly, soils form in materials that...
    547 Words | 2 Pages
  • Soil Sample in Cr - 769 Words
    On Friday February 03, 2012, we visited Don Egerico Mora Camacho and his wife Cecilia’s ranch. “They own 95 hectares of land, of which 5 hectares, in the lower part of the property, is in organic coffee and 90 hectares, which extend from their house up towards the Caraigres Mountains, is in cattle pastures.” We examined the land use capacity and made an evaluation the class of the soil. Honestly, this was a very interesting project for me because I had never done an experiment like such....
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  • Soil Research Paper - 3654 Words
    http://mysare.sare.org/mySARE/ProjectReport.aspx?do=viewRept&pn=OS09-047&y=2011&t=1 Burley tobacco has been the primary crop grown on farms in Eastern Kentucky. Most farms are small (<20 acres) and burly tobacco provided farmers with a profitable crop (>$1500/acre returns) that could be grown with minimal inputs. Traditionally family members assisted with all aspects of tobacco production from planting though harvest and stripping. However, changes in the marketing...
    3,654 Words | 12 Pages
  • Soil and Vegetation Regions Assessment
    Soil and Vegetation Regions Assessment 1. Describe the vegetation region in your area. Rate how natural the vegetation is on a scale of 0 (not natural) to 5 (very natural). Give a reason for your rating. Currently living in Brampton, the vegetation regions remains a mixed forest. Mixed forests are vegetational transition between coniferous forests and broad leaved deciduous forests. Common trees are ash, hemlock, oak, birch, maple, pine, fir, spruce, and cedar can be found in the mixed...
    1,257 Words | 4 Pages
  • Agriculture Science - Soils and Farming
    Factors that Affect Soil Nutrients Nutrient availability can be influenced by several factors and these include: 1. Soil Ph: The relative concentration of the hydrogen irons and or hydroxyl irons may either increase or decrease nutrient availability. 2. The Presence of Other Nutrients: The essence of the various mineral salts will either increase or decrease the other mineral salts in the soil. 3. Leaching: This encourages the draining of mineral salts from the topsoil to subsoil thereby...
    1,623 Words | 5 Pages
  • Soil Erosion by Water - 618 Words
    AGSM 335 Water and Soil Management AGSM 335 Water and Soil Management SOIL EROSION BY WATER READING MATERIAL CHAPTER 6 OF TEXT 1 2 3 dot = 5,000 acres red = HEL yellow = non- HEL 4 Sediment Sources and Sinks • Sources: natural erosion, ag lands, construction sites, roadway embankments, lumbered areas, surface mines • Sinks: pools and reservoirs, concave slopes, vegetation, flood plains Principal Processes • Detachment - dislodging of soil particles from the...
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  • Soil Erosion Central Vietnam
    The Economics of Soil Erosion and the Choice of Land Use Systems by Upland Farmers in Central Vietnam Bui Dung The December, 2001 Comments should be sent to the author, Bui Dung The at the Faculty of Economics, Hue University, 22 Phung Hung, Hue City, Vietnam. Email: buidungthe@hotmail.com or kinhte@dng.vnn.vn EEPSEA was established in May 1993 to support research and training in environmental and resource economics. Its objective is to enhance local capacity to undertake the...
    25,781 Words | 96 Pages
  • Ways to Prevent Soil Erosion
    Ways to Prevent Soil Erosion Soil Erosion Although many areas on earth can sustain plant growth, only about eight percent of the earth’s surface is covered with good topsoil. While it takes nature hundreds of years to make a few centimeters of topsoil, erosion can easily remove it. Without topsoil, people cannot raise crops for food.People know that without good soil they cannot raise agricultural crops. They also know from experience that wind and water can easily remove topsoil. Because...
    470 Words | 2 Pages
  • Soil Conservation Matrix - 528 Words
    Soil Conservation Matrix Review the three major types of soil degradation occurring in the environment. Briefly explain how each type of damage occurs. Causes Consequences Solutions Soil Erosion • Water, wind, and people. (Miller,2005 p.279) ●Soil erosion has two major harmful effects. One is loss of soil fertility through depletion of plant nutrients in topsoil. The other harmful effect occurs when eroded soil ends up as sediment in nearby surface waters, where it can...
    528 Words | 3 Pages
  • Characteristics of Brown Earth Soils
    GEOECOLOGY Describe and explain the characteristics of any one soil type you have studied. (2009 Q18, 80 marks) In this answer I will discuss the characteristics of the Brown Earth soil. Brown Earth soils are known as a zonal soil as they developed as a result of the Cool Temperate Oceanic climate and the natural, mixed, deciduous vegetation of this climatic region. This climatic region is located between 30o and 55o North of the Equator. Brown Earths are the most common soil...
    765 Words | 3 Pages
  • Group 8 Dispersive Soils
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    4,207 Words | 13 Pages
  • How To Prevent Soil Erosion
    How to Prevent Soil Erosion TERRACING  Terrace farming is a farming method that makes use of a hill to create a multiplatform farm. There are severals steps known as andenes which are built into the side of a hill. The idea behind it is that any rain that falls and builds up on the andenes will overflow into another andene below, making the most out of the nutrients it provides. CROP ROTATION The successive planting of different crops on the same land to improve soil fertility and...
    531 Words | 4 Pages
  • Soil and Arctic Tundra - 553 Words
    Tundra is the coldest of all the biomes. Tundra comes from the Finnish word tunturia, meaning treeless plain. It is noted for its frost-molded landscapes, extremely low temperatures, little precipitation, poor nutrients, and short growing seasons. Dead organic material functions as a nutrient pool. The two major nutrients are nitrogen and phosphorus. Nitrogen is created by biological fixation, and phosphorus is created by precipitation. Tundra is separated into two types: arctic tundra and...
    553 Words | 2 Pages
  • Microbial Analysis of Soil - 2600 Words
    Microbial analysis of soil, of top layer from selected sites of Area near Dahisar River Saika N. Esani University of Mumbai (Email – saikae@ymail.com) Abstract: soil samples were collected fortnightly from area near Dahisar River, A river in suburb of Mumbai. laboratory analysis started from July 2010 to September 2010. Total bacterial and fungal count were estimated by standard spread plate isolation. Isolated bacteria were subject to colony characterization and were estimated by their...
    2,600 Words | 9 Pages
  • SOIL EROSION REDUCTION - 3065 Words
    SOIL EROSION REDUCTION USING CORN AND GRASS A Research Proposal Presented to the Faculty of Civil Engineering Department, School of Engineering, Architecture and Fine Arts. University of Saint Louis, Tuguegarao City. In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements of Research Methods in CE for the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering Adriann Nathaniel Dela Rosa Romeo Bias Jr. Kneil Patrick Alviar 2014 APPROVAL SHEET In partial Fulfillment of the...
    3,065 Words | 10 Pages
  • Microbial Activity in the Soil - 2763 Words
    “An Essay Explaining the Biochemical Processes that Occur During Decomposition in the Soil Using Organisms such as Bacteria, Fungi and Algae. It also Involves an Analysis of the Chemical Reactions Facilitated, Processes Involved, Mineralization and the Role(s) of Organic and Inorganic Compounds.” by Alicea Bigby-Smart ID #: 12480025 Montego Bay Community College Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements of the Council of...
    2,763 Words | 10 Pages
  • Soil Frq for Apes - 379 Words
    Soil FRQ A) One chemical soil test we could do is a pH level test so we are able to tell what crops can grow in what areas. Other chemical tests include salinity, organic content (humus), or the iron exchange capacity. One Physical Soil test we can do is pick up a handful of it and rub it together with our fingers to tell if it’s a soil heavy in clay, silt, or sand. Other physical tests include water-holding capacity porosity, moisture content, soil structure, or color. By completing these...
    379 Words | 1 Page
  • Soil: Agriculture and Food Chain
    Chapter 11 : Soil: The Foundation for Land Ecosystem Chapter 11 Brooke Settles Chapter 11 discusses three major practices that expose soil erosion and how they can be corrected . The three are Over- cultivation, Overgrazing and Deforestation. These are each all major problems in creating an unsustainable society. The good thing is that each of these causes of erosion can be corrected to create a more sustainable society. First there is Overcultivation which is the practice of...
    860 Words | 3 Pages

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