Rational emotive behavior therapy Essays & Research Papers

Best Rational emotive behavior therapy Essays

  • Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy
    Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy Rational emotive behavior therapy, also known as REBT, is a type of cognitive-behavioral therapy developed by psychologist Albert Ellis. REBT is focused on helping clients change irrational beliefs. History of Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy Ellis had trained as a clinical psychologist. As he treated patients, he became increasingly dissatisfied with the results offered by traditional psychoanalytic therapy. He noted that while his patients were able to...
    863 Words | 3 Pages
  • Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy
    Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy Case Study of Molly A Conceptualization and Treatment Plan Rational Emotive Behavior therapy suggests that humans are neither all evil nor all good. REBT suggests that people are responsible for their own actions. The beliefs of individuals at times can be misleading; therefore, the actions that follow the beliefs are faulty as well. REBT allows for individuals to change their way of thinking in order to change the way in which they behave without having...
    593 Words | 2 Pages
  • Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT)
    It was a long day in the office and I was about to leave when a young lady come running into my office with her mother saying that they needed my assistance, so as the wonderful therapist that I am took out my pen and paper and started listening, the girl I was dealing with is call Adriane and she has recently left for college and is experiencing irrational thoughts and beliefs about her actions, Adriane is a 18 year old heterosexual African American female that is attending a primary white...
    1,645 Words | 5 Pages
  • Albert Ellis and the Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy
     Albert Ellis and the Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy Psychology, Period A December 10, 2012 Albert Ellis and the Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy Albert Ellis was born in Pittsburgh, PA on September 17, 1913. He was the eldest out of three children. As a child, he mostly took care of his younger siblings because his father was a business man and was mostly away on business trips. His mother was described as “self-absorbed” and “bi-polar” in his biography;...
    987 Words | 4 Pages
  • All Rational emotive behavior therapy Essays

  • Rational Emotive Behaviour Therapy - Essay
    A Brief Introduction To Rational Emotive Behaviour Therapy By Wayne Froggatt Third Ed.(this version Feb 2005) Rational Emotive Behaviour Therapy (REBT) is based on the concept that emotions and behaviours result from cognitive processes; and that it is possible for human beings to modify such processes to achieve different ways of feeling and behaving. REBT is one of a number of therapies that come under the heading ‘cognitive-behavioural’. In the mid-1950’s Dr. Albert Ellis, a...
    9,983 Words | 31 Pages
  • The Benefits of Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy When Used with Children and Adolescents
    The benefits of Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy when used with children and adolescents "People don't just get upset. They contribute to their upsetness. They always have the power to think, and to think about their thinking, and to think about thinking about their thinking, which the goddamn dolphin, as far as we know, can't do. Therefore they have much greater ability to change themselves than any other animal has, and I hope that REBT teaches them how to do it." -Albert Ellis...
    1,229 Words | 4 Pages
  • Therapeutic approach based on Rational Emotive Behaviour Therapy (REBT)
    INTRODUCTION 1. Key Theoretical concepts of my approach. My personal story. As a child, I was gregarious, outgoing, and happy-go-lucky. I did not know why I was unable to focus when I had been one of the best students during my primary school. I had been talkative, but I kept to myself, remained silent, and let bullies pick on me especially my father and my second sister who love to find faults in me and yelled at me for no reasons. I hadn't the slightest idea what was going on with my...
    3,009 Words | 9 Pages
  • APA Eassay Cognitive Behavior Therapy
     Cognitive Behavior Therapy: A Counseling Approach Erika Moton I.D 2085356 Developing a Psych Perspective 3002 Topic Analysis Assessment Capella University October 2014 Abstract This paper will discuss the theorists of cognitive behavior therapy beliefs and assumptions about helping and will describe the theorist’s helping style. It will further examine the theory’s key components: philosophy of a healthy personality, the nature and sources of dysfunction, and goals of the helping...
    1,550 Words | 5 Pages
  • CBT Therapy - 771 Words
    Brief history of the theory and theorist. In it's simplest form, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, (or CBT as it will be referred to from here on out), refers to the approach of changing dysfunctional behaviors and thoughts to realistic and healthy ones. CBT encompasses several types of therapy focusing on the impact of an individual's thinking as it relates to expressed behaviors. Such models include rational emotive therapy (RET), rational emotive behavioral therapy (REBT), behavior therapy...
    771 Words | 3 Pages
  • Rebt Therapy - 375 Words
    Genesis of REBT – The Historic thought/Ellis’s inspiration 3rd Century BC in Greece & roman Empire Stoicism was School of Philosophy – Key Philosophers -- Zeno of Citium (the founder of the school), Chrysippus [his most influential disciple], Panaetius of Rhodes (who introduced Stoicism into Rome), Cicero, Seneca, Epictetus, and Marcus Aurelius. Following were the key beliefs: * Destructive emotions resulted from errors in judgment, and that a sage, or person of "moral and...
    375 Words | 2 Pages
  • Cbt Therapy - 1213 Words
    Cognitive- Behavioral Therapy Danny Givens GCCS/523 Counseling for Change May Dr. Carla Letsch...
    1,213 Words | 5 Pages
  • Behavioral therapy outline - 1623 Words
    PCN-500 Theory Outline Erica Boltz I. Theory: Behavioral Therapy a. Key Concepts i. This approach operates by the following principles 1. Behaviors are strengthened or weakened by its consequences 2. Behaviors that get rewarded will increase and the ones that get punished will decrease 3. This is a functional approach, rather than structural 4. Positive and negative environments can have a positive or negative affect on client 5. Behaviorism is ant mentalist 6. Behavior therapy is...
    1,623 Words | 8 Pages
  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - 1753 Words
    Theory Critique on: Cognitive Behavioral and Reality Therapy Liberty College Debra Borzym Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Aaron Beck is known as the pioneer of cognitive therapy, which has been a utilized approach to psychotherapy. Beck attempted to further Freud’s theory of depression; however, the research moved more towards errors in logic, coined “cognitive distortions” which were deemed the basis of underlying dysfunction and depression. The fundamental aspect of cognitive...
    1,753 Words | 6 Pages
  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - 2210 Words
    Historical Origins & Major Contributions: In the early 1960’s there was a drift towards Cognitive Behavior Therapy as people turned away out of disappointment in the psychodynamic theory for psychotherapy. Also at this time social learning theory was the new and upcoming study. This is when Cognitive theory emerged with Alfred Adler. He was the first Cognitive therapist who came up with the idea that an individuals beliefs and ideas is what makes up their behavior (Lantz, 1996). He...
    2,210 Words | 6 Pages
  • Cjhs400 R1 Behavior Plan Template Week 3
    University of Phoenix Material Behavior Plan Template Use this template to create behavioral plans for assignments in Weeks Two and Three. Fill in each section and provide additional information as needed. Client Identifying Information List all pertinent and known identifying information. Name Max Age 35 (About) Gender Male Religion None History Describe all pertinent and known history. Medical He has suffered from depression in the past. Family He does not talk about his family, which...
    1,111 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Basics of Cognitive Theory in Relation to the Development of Abnormal Behavior
    Nicole Maloney 18th October 2011 Approved…………… Explain the basics of cognitive theory in relation to the development of abnormal behavior. Use Aaron T. Beck and Albert Ellis as theorists for reference. If you believe the saying 'Perception is everything,' then you may well be a cognitivist. According to the cognitive perspective, people engage in abnormal behavior because of particular thoughts and behaviors that are...
    1,787 Words | 6 Pages
  • How Can Modern Behavioural Therapies Help a Client Accept the Uncertainty of Their Future
    “How can modern behavioural therapies help a client accept the uncertainty of their future?” In order to evaluate whether modern behavioural therapies can help a client accept the uncertainty of their future, I am going to look in detail at two Modern Behavioural therapies, REBT – Rational Emotive Behavioural Therapy and CBT – Cognitive Behaviour Therapy to ascertain their use in therapy with a client. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) is a talking therapy it is a way of talking about,...
    2,816 Words | 8 Pages
  • Coping with Stress Through Communication
    Coping With Stress Through Communication University of South Carolina Aiken Alex Cohen March 22, 2012 “On my honor as a University of South Carolina Aiken student, I have completed my work according to the principle of Academic Integrity. I have neither given nor received any unauthorized aid on this assignment/examination.” ___________________________________ ________________ Signature Date Coping With Stress The pressure, responsibility, and performance expected out...
    1,047 Words | 4 Pages
  • Case Conceptualization - 2507 Words
    Rational Emotive Behavioral Therapy Case Conceptualization of Michael Noelle Pauling Liberty University Abstract This is a case conceptualization of a client referred to a Residential Treatment Facility by Family Court for treatment and evaluation of intellectual, academic, and behavioral performance. The client presents with several issues. In the client interview, the counselor hypothesizes that client has difficulty with anger, aggression, and low frustration tolerance. The client’s...
    2,507 Words | 8 Pages
  • Rebt - 2006 Words
    Rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT) Rational emotive behavior therapy (REBT), previously called rational therapy and rational emotive therapy, is an active-directive, comprehensive, philosophically and empirically based psychotherapy which focuses on resolving behavioral and emotional problems and disturbances and enabling people to lead happier and more fulfilling lives. REBT was created and developed by Albert Ellis-American psychotherapist and psychologist who...
    2,006 Words | 5 Pages
  • Analysis of Albert Ellis's Life Experiences and Psychological Philosophies
    Analysis of Albert Ellis's Life Experiences and Psychological Philosophies Life, Education, and Experiences Famed American psychologist Albert Ellis (1913-2007) was born in Pittsburgh and raised in New York City (DiGiuseppe 1989, Ellis 1992, , Sheehy 1997). Albert reportedly had a somewhat troubled childhood, but overcame his troubles by becoming a "stubborn and pronounced problem solver" (DiGiuseppe 1989, Ellis 1992, , Sheehy 1997). As a young child Albert became afflicted with a serious...
    3,207 Words | 9 Pages
  • Case Analysis - 1258 Words
    Ana Case Study Analysis Written By: Marcella Fullilove Grand Canyon University: PCN 500 Counseling Theories 3/21/2012 Instructor: Dr. Cheryl Fisher The use of a case study analysis can help a student or group apply the best theory to an individual’s problems or issues. The green team will face the challenges as therapist to provide the necessary problem solving skills that may be suitable to this case study. Ana is the adult female in this case study who is face with...
    1,258 Words | 4 Pages
  • Rebt Cognitive Theory Case Study
    REBT Cognitive Theory Case Study of Chris: A Conceptualization and Treatment Plan Abstract Rational emotive behavior therapy, REBT, considers human beings as responsibly hedonistic in the significance that they attempt to stay alive and attain some level of happiness. However, it also holds that humans are likely to accept illogical beliefs and actions which continue to be in the way of accomplishing their aspirations and intentions. Often, these irrational beliefs or ideas come into being...
    2,479 Words | 7 Pages
  • Self-Reflection Speech - 322 Words
    IIC Oral presentation - Self-reflection Speech What has you learnt from this course? Good morning everyone. Today I'm going to talking about my knowledge what I had gained from this course. Before starting, I want to ask you guys some questions. Do you like to share your emotions to others? Do you believe that showing emotions openly is a good things? Let's think it in a minutes and think it by your own. Okay now, I want to share a theory to all of you, which can help you to change what...
    322 Words | 1 Page
  • In this compare and contrast paper I will highlight the differences and commonalities
     Compare and Contrast Paper Jeremiah Barwick Liberty CCOU 201 In this compare and contrast paper I will highlight the differences and commonalities between Larry Crabb’s biblical model of counseling, theories, and techniques of Rodgerian theory called Rodgers’ Client-Centered Therapy (RCCT), Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT), and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT). All of these theories are a form of psychotherapy. Couselors today use techniques such as...
    1,155 Words | 7 Pages
  • Compare and Contrast Paper - 1899 Words
     Compare and Contrast Paper on Christian Counseling Methods By: John M Shisler For: CCOU 201 – D10 Summer 2014 Introduction Christian counselors are doing God’s work and must use the Spiritual Gifts with which they were blessed to be able to reach their clients. While it may be difficult to always reach a client right away, when a Christian counselor can be effective and help someone understand what God desires for them, it can be a very fulfilling and satisfying experience. But the...
    1,899 Words | 5 Pages
  • Executive Coaching Intertwines Multiple Practical Theories
    RUNNING HEAD: Theories Provide Executive Coaching Foundation Executive Coaching Intertwines Multiple Practical Theories Will Ackerman MLC 650 Bellevue University March 5, 2011 ABSTRACT Myriad theories form the foundation for executive coaching. There is no one approach that fits best. To be an effective executive coach, you must have a variety of tools and resources at your fingertips. This paper highlights three significant theories that are beneficial for the executive coach to...
    3,099 Words | 9 Pages
  • Good Will Hunting and Psychology
    ''Good Will Hunting'' is about a brilliant man named Will Hunting who is a janitor at one of the best universities around. One day while Will was cleaning the building he looked at one of the math class’s bulletin board with very difficult problems that no one could do, but he was able. So Will answered the problem anonymously. The University finally did find who answered the problems and the professor of the math class found him in jail, the professor made an agreement with the judge that he...
    643 Words | 2 Pages
  • Demonstrate Your Understanding of the Abcdef, Indicating How You Would Apply It in Counselling.
    2.5 Demonstrate your understanding of the ABCDEF, indicating how you would apply it in counselling. The ‘ABC framework’ was created by Albert Ellis in the 1950’s and is mainly used by counsellors who use Rational Emotive Behaviour Therapy (REBT) or Rational Emotive Therapy (RET). It is also used by some Cognitive or Cognitive Behavioural therapists. ABCDEF are acronyms for the sequential method of working through these types of brief psychotherapies. The ABC method of working with people can...
    1,213 Words | 4 Pages
  • Power Rights and Interest - 526 Words
    Power, Rights and InterestsPower, Rights and InterestsFollowing Tina’s insensitive and argumentative attitude that spurred a recent incident in which she made ethnically insensitive comments to a customer making a return, Joe decided to suspend her for three days. Upon her return, Tina became argumentative with Joe and demanded that he remove the suspension from her record as it was unjust and discriminatory. Joe refused to waiver, and told Tina to get back to work. Tina has gone into...
    526 Words | 2 Pages
  • Theoretical Orientation - 1556 Words
     Cognitive Behavior Therapy: Theoretical Orientation Paper Angela Williams Delta State University CED 601 December 10, 2014 Cognitive Behavior Therapy My Personal Approach to Counseling Throughout this course I have taken great interested in Cognitive Behavioral Theory or (CBT) which was developed in the 1960s by Albert Ellis and Aaron Beck. CBT is a therapeutic technique that underlies with other different theories, which also focused on the “here and now”. Put simply,...
    1,556 Words | 5 Pages
  • Intervention Strategy - 997 Words
    Zayed University | Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy | The A-B-C-D-E Model in the Treatment of Stress | Aalia AlFalasi 5/8/2013 | Psychological therapies are based on different psychological theories where different approaches are exercised and practiced to achieve the best results in treating clients. One of the most widely spread psychological therapies is the Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT) as one of cognitive behavior therapies. Like other cognitive behavior...
    997 Words | 3 Pages
  • Compare and contrast - 2104 Words
    Introduction Researching the Bible in order to help someone with their problems has been around for centuries. Biblical counseling is a practical and effective way to teach through the understanding of Scripture; that thoughts, attitudes, motives, and words flow from a sinful nature of a selfish heart. In counseling, whether Biblical or secular, the main objective should be to help the counselee with the issues they are dealing with. Focusing on keeping the truth in the forefront of the...
    2,104 Words | 6 Pages
  • Comparing Cct and Rebt a Case Study
    CRITICAL EVALUATION OF A MAJOR THERAPUETIC ORIENTATION Case study: George George is a 40-year-old senior executive in a large company, a position he has only recently taken up. He was referred to counselling by his general practitioner to explore his mood swings. He has been married for nearly 5 years to a ‘warm and wonderful person’. There were no children yet, and the couple was wondering about the right time for having children. This has been an area of disagreement between George and...
    3,676 Words | 14 Pages
  • Profile of Albert Ellis - 3027 Words
    Running Head: Albert Ellis Albert Ellis Metropolitan State University Biography Albert Ellis was born into his Jewish family on September 17, 1913 in Pittsburgh where is father was a businessman. Growing up Ellis classified his parents as emotionally distant and barely showed mediocre affection to their children. His mother he describes as self-absorbed with a bi-polar affect, his father was mostly away on business. As a child Ellis suffered numerous health problems and hospitalized...
    3,027 Words | 9 Pages
  • Essay Skinner - 951 Words
    Critically discuss Albert Elli’s notion of ‘irrational belief’. Include in your answer a discussion of what constitute a ‘rational belief’ Dr. Albert Ellis, a business graduated and psychoanalyst by training, became disappointed of psychoanalysis after observing improvements of his clients once they change their approach of thinking about themselves, their difficulties and the world. His (Rational Emotive Behaviour Therapy) theory is based in positive and negative emotions and the cognitive...
    951 Words | 3 Pages
  • REBT And CT - 620 Words
    REBT and CT Donna, Kevin and Cindy Albert Ellis – R.E.B.T • Rational Emotive Behaviour therapy is a form of psychotherapy and a philosophy of living created by Ellis in 1950’s. • R.E.B.T focusses on helping clients change irrational beliefs. • Based on the premise that whenever we become upset it is not the event that has taken place that upsets us, it is the beliefs that we hold that causes the onset of depression, anxiety and so on. • Ellis and R.E.B.T believed the vast majority of us want...
    620 Words | 3 Pages
  • Coun 506 Journal Review
    Interventions that Apply Scripture in Psychotherapy Kaitlin Clark Liberty University Interventions that Apply Scripture in Psychotherapy Summary In this paper I will review the article “Interventions that Apply Scripture in Psychotherapy.” (Garzon 2005). Overall counseling can be very tricky, especially when the client is religious. This will require the counselor to use multiple resources, such as the Bible, when coming up with a treatment plan. The word of God is superior when it...
    1,275 Words | 4 Pages
  • Family Counseling Approach - 623 Words
    All families are different, just as every individual is unique within the family structure but the general concept of family counseling is universal. The point is to help families work through conflicts and create resolutions that respect each individuals in the family unit. Individual goals become the family’s total goal. Its not about placing blame or playing one family member against the other. Family counseling is about family healing. Selecting a Family Counseling Service: Accepting...
    623 Words | 2 Pages
  • Counselling Report on Depression - 2559 Words
    Specialist Diploma In Counselling Psychology Case Study Mei Ling Conceptualise the individual and presenting problem Mei Ling is a thirty-three years old who works as a nurse in a busy surgical ward. She is married to Steven for fourteen years. She has two sons whom aged eleven and eight years old. Lately she begun to fear that Steven is having an affair and will leave her. Mei Ling had seen her general practitioner (GP) for lack of energy and vague gastrointestinal...
    2,559 Words | 9 Pages
  • Clinical Psychology Interview - 1567 Words
    Running Head: Clinical Interview with Dr. Ian Smith, Ph.D. Clinical Interview with Dr. Ian Smith, PhD Understanding The Field of Clinical Psychologists Rodnerus Palmer Abstract An interview with a professional clinical psychologist, Dr. Ian Smith, Ph.D, was done on August 8, 2007. In the interview topics were discussed such as: background of Dr. Smith, Ph.D, a typical day of a psychologist, career path, qualities necessary for someone in the field to be successful and training....
    1,567 Words | 5 Pages
  • Cognitive-Behavioral Approach - 1031 Words
    Cognitive-Behavioral Approach Introduction Our thought process plays a very important role in how we feel generally and in what we do. There is a type of psychotherapy that places emphasis on this role that our thought process plays in these situations and it is called cognitive behavioral therapy. This theory focus on the idea that all our attitudes, feelings and behaviors are caused by our thoughts, and not by external factors such as events, people and situations that we encounter....
    1,031 Words | 3 Pages
  • Triad Summary Paper - 2396 Words
    Triad Clinical Summary and Assessment paper Irish Trinidad Pacific Oaks College Introduction Communication and Counseling Skills MFT 507 Makisha Lawrence, PsyD December 4, 2012 Triad Clinical Summary and Assessment paper I watched two sessions conducted by two well-known psychotherapists, Carl Rogers and Albert Ellis. I chose these two sessions because of their client, Gloria. I found Gloria to be an interesting subject and because she was interviewed by the two psychotherapists, I...
    2,396 Words | 7 Pages
  • A Description of the R.E.B.T Theory - 986 Words
     Joanne Danbrova Grand Canyon University: PCN-500-O500 January 25th, 2015 RaTonya Bennett The R.E.B.T theory is very appropriate for Ana’s case. The case study displays quite a few details which lead to the conclusion that R.E.B.T is the right choice to use. Ana’s variety of facts within her case present themselves as issues in which R.E.B.T is known to help other clients with the same issues; that is why Ana should have the opportunity to experience this particular type of...
    986 Words | 3 Pages
  • Analyzing Counseling Theories - 3836 Words
    Analyzing Counseling Theories Walden University COUN-6722-11 January 19, 2014 Dr. Kim Mason Analyzing Counseling Theories Part 1 Chart Theory 1 Reality Therapy/Choice TheoryTheory 2 Rational Emotive Behavior TherapyBackground Theory Originated by Willam Glasser Glasser first developed and used in correctional institution and psychiatric hospital Focuses on belief that people are responsible for their own actions, and cannot blame outside sources or the past Glasser believe that behavior...
    3,836 Words | 11 Pages
  • School Counseling - 556 Words
    Introduction to School Counseling Counseling Theory & Philosophy of School Counseling Intro School Counseling 4/29/13 Counseling Theory I would say that the theories of counseling that best represent me as a school counselor would be the combination of Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT) and Child-Centered therapy. The two goals of REBT is to first have the child understand that their thoughts are not rational and the conclusions that they are coming to are not true...
    556 Words | 2 Pages
  • Counseling Approaches - 5964 Words
    Reality Therapy approaches counseling from a confrontational perspective. The counselor confronts the individual with the facts of life, expecting him to face up to the issues. It is true that we are to confront people with the truth in love as directed by the Holy Spirit. However, the problem is that most troubled people are running from the issues. Some professionals have categorized some forty defense mechanisms that people use to avoid facing the truth. Often people run from the issues...
    5,964 Words | 19 Pages
  • A Personal Approach to Counseling Using a Short Story
    A PERSONAL APPROACH TO COUNSELING USING A SHORT STORY A Personal Approach to Counseling Using a Short Story Being a counselor and working with people, things are not always as easy as they seem to be. People are not as simple as they seem. In one minute they are happy, then sad the next moment. This complexity of the human person made me realize that one form of solution will never be enough in achieving goals and self-actualization. And so, as a therapist, I created my personal style in...
    2,094 Words | 5 Pages
  • REBT - 1545 Words
    VAL CASTELLANO MA CLINICAL PSYCH COGNITIVE BEHAVIOR APPROACH Albert Ellis  A showy, humorous, and often abrasive figure, first articulated his highly influential based on the A-B-C theory of Change. He Continued to developing his ideas, teaching, and writing until his death in 2007 at age of 93. His theory used cognitive, behavioral, and affective techniques to help people make themselves less unhappy. Aaron Beck  One of the most disciplined researchers om the field...
    1,545 Words | 10 Pages
  • Role of Cognition in Counseling - 1596 Words
    ROLE OF COGNITION IN COUNSELING TABLE OF CONTENT. Introduction………………………………………………………….. 3 Cognitive therapy…………………………………………………….4 Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy...……………………………….4 Characteristics of cognitive-behavioral therapy….5 Virtual Reality Therapy...…………………………………………8 Rational Emotive Therapy………….……………………………8 Transactional ANALYSIS…………………………………………...8 conlusion………………………………………………………………..9 reference………………………………………………………………10 Role of...
    1,596 Words | 6 Pages
  • Cognitive theory Plan - 596 Words
    University of Phoenix Material Behavior Plan Template Use this template to create behavioral plans for assignments in Weeks Two and Three. Fill in each section and provide additional information as needed. Client Identifying Information List all pertinent and known identifying information. Name Violet Age 20 Gender Female Religion Unknown History Describe all pertinent and known history. Medical Depression, sexually abused, started at age 12. Has used self-harm in an attempt to regulate...
    596 Words | 3 Pages
  • Child and Neglect - 947 Words
    Abstract This paper gives the following: effective interviewing skills related to children and teens coping with child abuse and neglect and an in-depth discussion of a specific evidenced-based intervention theory to use with either children or teens that have experienced child abuse. The child abuse and neglect paper that I used for my assessment is the Sandra Horton case. The Horton family has many emotional, mental, and physical issues. The primary caregiver is Michelle Horton,...
    947 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Ideal Society – Reason vs. Emotions
    The Ideal Society – Reason vs. Emotions An ideal society is one in which people act together as one for the greater good of the society, rather than the individual. The question is: are people to look to their emotional or rational side in determining what to act upon? The obvious answer is – reason. Where with reason, the answers are clear, emotions often cloud judgment. In a rational society, people know their place and their duty. For instance, a garbage collector may not enjoy the...
    393 Words | 2 Pages
  • Theory and Practice of Group Counseling Book Review
    Corey, G. (1999). Theory and practice of group counseling. (3rd ed.). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing. This text was written for graduate or undergraduate students in any field involving human services but is especially suitable for students enrolled in any course of Theory and Practice of Group Counseling, practitioners who are involved in group work, and students who are interested in leading various types of groups. This text presents an overview of various theoretical models and...
    570 Words | 2 Pages
  • Proof Media Assignment - 484 Words
    Proof Media Assignment (Topic#1) Alice Wang The directorial decision to include Catherine’s eulogy and the post funeral party scene in the film effectively enhanced character development. Catherine’s eulogy was significant in displaying Catherine’s behaviour in front of crowds, and her rash decision to make a speech at her father’s funeral. Catherine is shown to make emotional and rash decisions on the spot, not thinking of consequence. Catherine’s shocking speech is made in a calm tone...
    484 Words | 2 Pages
  • Critique of Two Theories” - 1525 Words
    “Critique of Two Theories” Effective Biblical Counseling, by Dr. Larry Crabb Part I: Goal of Christian Counseling Dr. Crabb tells us that Christian Counselors should always try to assist the client by first seeing how they got into the problem and from there help them to see how not to repeat their mistake and end up in the same problem again. “When a Christian starts to understand their true acceptance in the Lord and each other, then problems start to...
    1,525 Words | 4 Pages
  • Cognitive Behaviour - 1717 Words
    FOUNDERS AND HISTORY OF COGNITIVE BEHAVIOUR THEORY The first discrete, intentionally therapeutic approach to Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) to be developed was Rational Emotive Therapy (RET), which was originated by Albert Ellis, Ph.D. in the mid-1950's. Ellis developed his approach in reaction to his disliking of the in-efficient and in-directive nature of Psychoanalysis. The philosophic origins of RET go back to the Stoic philosophers, including Epictetus and Marcus Aurelius. ...
    1,717 Words | 7 Pages
  • REACTION PAPER ON GEORGE KELLY AND ALBERT ELLIS’ THEORIES
    GEORGE KELLY In George Kelly’s theory, he stated the “man-the-scientist” perspective wherein people try to make a hypothesis about a certain thing. I agree on his theory because whenever we experience kinds of “first time”, we automatically attach our hypothesis and eventually detach it whenever we discover something else. Like for example, you meet someone for the first time, you actually don’t know everything about him but you seem to observe that he’s quiet. So, you try to predict that...
    323 Words | 1 Page
  • Cbt Essay - 1103 Words
    In order to overcome behavioral problems such as anxiety, depression or fear, individuals usually communicate their problems or anxieties with their trusted friends or family members. In case of a somewhat complicated problem, a counselor is consulted. These are a relatively simple form of counseling that individuals have been practicing from centuries. However, with the development of modern science and advancements in the field of psychology, theorists have identified some more effective...
    1,103 Words | 4 Pages
  • Thought Focused Treatments - 1662 Words
    Thought-Focused Treatments Different approaches to therapy exist. Understanding the different approaches can help clinicians offer better interventions based on the nature of the problem and the desired outcome. Two main approached to therapy exist: psychoanalytical and thought-focused treatments. Thought-focused treatment approaches developed as psychologists began to challenge the practices of psychoanalytical treatments. Differences in beliefs in the interaction of cognition, emotions,...
    1,662 Words | 5 Pages
  • Case Conceptualization - 3553 Words
    Identifying Information Giuseppe is a 14-year-10 month-old, Latino male in the 8th grade referred for counseling through AB3632 from Hollywood Senior high School under the Los Angeles Unified School District. Giuseppe’s school counselor indicates Giuseppe has difficulty controlling his anger towards peers. She also shares that Giuseppe fights with his peers leading to a suspension from school for three days due to fighting. Giuseppe’s mother reports that at home he is very oppositional...
    3,553 Words | 10 Pages
  • Explain the Key Features of Two Therapeutic Models (Cbt and Ta)
    Explain the key features of two therapeutic models (CBT AND TA) Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (also known by its abbreviation CBT) was primarily developed through an integration of behavior therapy (first popularized by Edward Thorndike) with cognitive therapy (developed by Aaron Beck and Albert Ellis). The first discrete, intentionally therapeutic approach to CBT to be developed was Rational Emotive Therapy (RET), which was originated by Albert Ellis, Ph.D. in the mid-1950's. Ellis...
    1,412 Words | 5 Pages
  • Personal Theory Paper - 963 Words
     Personal Theory Deana Micheal Theories and Practice: Human Services in Criminal Justice CJHS/400 October 20, 2014 Tracey Newman Personal Theory Throughout my experience my current course, Theories and Practices: Human Services in Criminal Justice, I have learned plenty of information about the various theories of psychotherapy in counseling. Some of these theories operate on the basis of recognizing errors in thinking and correcting those errors. Other theories operate on the basis...
    963 Words | 3 Pages
  • We Americans Should Read Poetry
    Why many Americans should read poetry Americans should read poetry because it inspires, challenges, and tells stories of emotions that can help you find deep meaning inside yourself. Even though much of the famous poetry in the world came from Europe during the renaissance, students around the world study it. Yet in America we lack courses that effectively explain the meaning and importance of poetry. Poetry can change your life around because it makes you search your soul for answers that...
    622 Words | 2 Pages
  • Chapter 4 Outline - 1097 Words
     Chapter 4 Outline Coping strategies: active coping, planning, suppression of competing activities, restraint coping, seeking social support for instrumental reasons, seeking social support for emotional reasons, positive reinterpretation and growth, acceptance, turning to religion, focus on and venting of emotions, denial, behavioral disengagement, mental disengagement, alcohol-drug disengagement. Learned helplessness: is a passive behavior produced by exposure to unavoidable...
    1,097 Words | 4 Pages
  • Power of Emotions - 687 Words
    Power of Emotion Emotion is an individual’s feelings that can be represented by facial expressions, tone of voice, and body language. In the short story “The Moose and the Sparrow”, the author Hugh Garner communicates the idea of Moose Madden’s inability to control his emotions has led to his death, by describing specific events incisively throughout the story. He suggests that violence and serious consequences can be easily caused by unchecked emotions. Hot temper, sensitiveness and...
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  • different theories - 3162 Words
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