Philosophy of religion Essays & Research Papers

Best Philosophy of religion Essays

  • Philosophy and Religion - 1775 Words
     Philosophy and Religion PHI 208 Craig Thompson February 3, 2014 For centuries philosophers have been asking questions about ethics, epistemology and religion to try and better understand these topics along with being able to define them. Throughout this paper I plan to discuss the ideas and thoughts that go into philosophy and religion. There have been many questions when it comes to religion like whether or not it is necessary to prove...
    1,775 Words | 5 Pages
  • Religion vs. Philosophy - 1216 Words
    Religion Term Paper Philosophy and Religion "An Idea is more powerful than an army (pg 14, Munroe)." When first looking at the relationship between philosophy and religion, I found it easier to explain the differences rather than the similarities. I began this paper the same way I do others. This generally involves a profound amount of research on the topic at hand. However, in contrast to the other papers I have done, the definitions of philosophy and religion only raised more questions...
    1,216 Words | 4 Pages
  • Philosophy, ethics and religion mark scheme
     Philosophy and Ethics AS Revision Booklet Unit 1 Contents From Contingency to Necessity 6 The Teleological Argument – Revision Summary 8 Criticisms of Paley 8 Hume: 8 Kant: Paley’s argument is based on the premise that there is design and therefore order in the universe. Kant argues that the world maybe in chaos. As human minds organise experiences into a perceived order, so we impose, or project, order onto a chaotic world. 8 Supporters of the Teleological...
    9,959 Words | 38 Pages
  • Religion - 2908 Words
     Religion in the workplace September 21, 2014 Religion in the workplace can be a very controversial issue among both parties. I will try and explain through theories why religion in the workplace can be fine even without offending those that are not religious. Many Christians believe that physical labor should not be performed on Saturdays or Sundays. Some religions even have practices such as keeping a beard or sacrificing animals. The First Amendment guarantees...
    2,908 Words | 8 Pages
  • All Philosophy of religion Essays

  • Religion - 1429 Words
    Some say that Religion and Wisdom go hand in hand. That one is unable to thrive without the other. In this Explanatory Synthesis I will discuss Karen Armstrong and Robert Thurman beliefs and differences about the two subjects. I am going to be using the section “Homo Religiosus” written by Armstrong and the section “Wisdom” written by Thurman to compare the author’s views. Robert Thurman is one of the first Americans to be ordained as a Tibetan Buddhist monk. He is a scholar, translator,...
    1,429 Words | 4 Pages
  • pyschology or religion - 1784 Words
    Name Instructor Course Date Psychology, Religion and Conversion Introduction The psychology of religion entails the use of psychological techniques and informative structures to religious backgrounds, as well as to both nonreligious and religious individuals. The science has made numerous attempts to describe the content, foundation and the application of religious beliefs and behaviors. It is clear that many areas of religion remain unexplored by psychologists. Even though, spirituality...
    1,784 Words | 5 Pages
  • Religion and Science - 1348 Words
    Religion and Science Science and religion are two of the most important aspects of many people’s lives, and they are just as controversial. They are believed to answer the same questions, so many people tend to pick one or the other to rely on, but can they co-exist? Both Einstein and I believe so. At a conference on science, philosophy, and religion in 1941, Einstein made the famous statement “Science without religion is lame. Religion without science is blind.” Religion and science go...
    1,348 Words | 4 Pages
  • Psychology of Religion - 1184 Words
    How does the Psych of Religion resolve conflict between Science and Religion? In the past, both hard and soft sciences have been a link through which we could factually explain everything, down to the origins of life. Unfortunately, human behavior has proven itself to be far more complex than advocates of human sciences could imagine. The “brave new world” promised by new technologies has turned out to be just as dominated by war and injustices as those “primitive” religious cultures. Peace,...
    1,184 Words | 3 Pages
  • Introduction to Philosophy - 985 Words
    American University of Central Asia Existence of God Thomas Aquinas, Rene Descartes Sydykova Aizirek Introduction to philosophy Beishegul Alieva 11.03.2013 There are different questions of reality. Each man on the earth wants to know some things obviously, but there are some of them which people cannot obviously prove, for example how world was created, existence of God, what morality, justice,...
    985 Words | 3 Pages
  • Science and Religion - 455 Words
    Science vs. Religion • Einstein said ‘science without religion is lame and religion without science is blind'. • Science + religion are two very different aspects of life, they both have their value and importance. • History shows us that science and religion are in conflict as religion has been the dominant power but in more recent years science has taken its place. • Which is science more important than religion OUTLOOK –The outlook of science is rational is relies on evidence,...
    455 Words | 2 Pages
  • Is Science a Religion? - 1808 Words
    INTRODUCTION Is science a religion? This topic has been debated by many creationists and scientists alike. The philosophy of science makes no claims to knowledge about the supernatural or metaphysical and, by not so doing, is left with an enterprise that although hugely successful is also permanently on trial (Manne, 2010). The only thing scientists can agree upon is the empirical nature of science, but the steps from observations to theory are not without philosophical problems. DISCUSSION...
    1,808 Words | 5 Pages
  • Psychology and Religion - 1229 Words
    PROJECT 6 Kaplan University ABSTRACT This deductive essay explores the relationship between and the practices involving psychology and religion in order to uphold the ethics code. There is a sensitivity level that must be exhibited by psychology professionals that practice traditional psychology in order to make clients feel comfortable and secure in the treatment setting. In addition, this essay explains the use of religion in non-traditional...
    1,229 Words | 4 Pages
  • Philosophy Response Paper - 1264 Words
    Response Paper Philosophy 201 Brittany Timblin The existence of God has been a huge issue for many, many centuries. In H. J. McCloskey's article "On being an Atheist" he said that the cosmological and teleological arguments are false and that we need to forget the idea of God completely because there is no definitive proof. McCloskey's main issue with the idea of God is the presence of evil in the world. ca The simple term "proof" is what McCloskey refers to as the arguments....
    1,264 Words | 3 Pages
  • Religion, Morality, and the Good Life
    Religion, Morality, and the Good Life Does morality depend on religion? Many believe the fundamental aspects of morality and religion join to form the basis on how one chooses to live their life. Some would define morality as a system we humans use to distinguish between what is right and what is wrong. Morality could derive from a number of different factors including, religion, culture, and upbringing. Those that believe that morality derives from religion or God’s commands trust in the...
    1,609 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Equilibrium of Religion and Science - 1003 Words
    The Equilibrium of Religion and Science True science discovers God waiting behind every door. ----Pope Pius XII In the common sense, science and religion are considered to be two things at odds, for they contradict each other. In the aspects of the exterior, it is true. Giordano Bruno was burnt alive by the Catholics for revealing scientific truth. Darwin’s theory of evolution is not taken into curriculum in half of the middle school in US because of the oppression from Catholic. However,...
    1,003 Words | 3 Pages
  • Social Conformity and Persuasion in Religion
    The Influence of conformity on society through religionmore by John Chaaya 2,137 Download (.doc) The Influence of conformity on society in religion Religion has influenced societies on an epic scale for millennia. Even the mostprimitive people on the planet created gods to worship and use their teachings toform the basis of their society going back as far as the Paleolithic period wheremother earth was worshiped as a goddess. Through time people have stayedtrue to a belief or a...
    1,370 Words | 4 Pages
  • Mental Health and Religion - 2001 Words
    Mental Health and Religion · Abstract The aim of this investigation was to study the relationship between good mental health and religion. To study a group of participants I designed a questionnaire, which used a likert scale, and the data collected was analysed using a program on SPSS. The data collected had a significant negative correlation, so the results were similar to those from other studies examining religion and its relationship with mental health. In general the individuals...
    2,001 Words | 8 Pages
  • Science vs Religion - 2112 Words
    The relationship between religion and science has been a subject of study since Classical antiquity, addressed by philosophers, theologians, scientists, and other commentators. Perspectives from different geographical regions, cultures and historical epochs are diverse. Recent commentators have characterized the relationship as one of 4 categories: conflict, independence, dialogue, and integration. Discussions of what is science and what is not science, the demarcation problem in the philosophy...
    2,112 Words | 7 Pages
  • Religion-Week 1 - 764 Words
    Explain whether you agree or disagree with the notion that religion and science can coexist. Name at least two (2) key points from the podcast that substantiate your position. I do believe that religion and science can coexist. In the interview the commentator explains that one of professor Francisco Ayala's (Faith Matters. 2010, April 02) statements was that "science and religion need not be in contradiction if they are properly understood"..... "religion explains why and science explains...
    764 Words | 2 Pages
  • Are Science and Religion in Conflict? Essay
    Are Science and Religion in Conflict? PHI 103 Informal Logic May 28th, 2012 As far back as history goes, there have been numerous enlightenments for events that seem out of human control. Up to date civilized history, religious and scientific views have frequently conflicted with one another. Religious concepts are normally presented first and then adequate scientific evidence accrues to challenge religious beliefs. These discoveries of science are encountered with skepticism and most are...
    1,497 Words | 4 Pages
  • Science vs. Religion - 806 Words
    Science vs. Religion The debate between religion and science has been going on for years, clashing together with different ideologies. The argument combines historical and philosophical approaches to contest to each side, battling to disprove each other. While religion is based on faith, using the will of God to guide them in their observations, scientists use experiments to find discoveries based on facts. The conflict between religion and science hasn’t been fiery in modern times, compared...
    806 Words | 3 Pages
  • Secularisation theory and religion in the U.S.
    This essay will critically evaluate secularisation theory as a means of understanding the current state of religion within the United States. The end of religion has for centuries been predicted with passionate conviction by a large portion of western academics and sociological commentators. Since the period of the Enlightenment and the rise of reason and science in the Western world, a great number of seminal thinkers have linked this supposed decline of religion and its waning influence in...
    3,800 Words | 12 Pages
  • Cosmology: Science vs Religion
    In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, Christian belief encountered significant opposition. Until then, most of the world shared the belief of the "Medieval world view" that not only was the earth positioned at the center of the universe, but that God was all knowing, all powerful and all good. God was thought to have created and sustained the wondrous workings of the universe. This belief told the people all they needed to know about the meaning and purpose of life. Then, scientific...
    839 Words | 3 Pages
  • Role of Religion in the Englightenment (Descartes and Voltaire)
    During the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries writers such as Descartes and Voltaire were heavily influenced by religion, as evidence of their writings. The Declaration of the Rights of Man is a perfect example of how religion impacted society during the period of Enlightenment. As Descartes uses knowledge as an Archimedean point, he uses the existence of God as part of this knowledge. He studied the relation between science and religion very carefully. He set out to find out how we know...
    617 Words | 2 Pages
  • What is Religion and what does it do?
     What is Religion and what does it do? Whether religion is the basis for the noblest events in human history, or a negative force responsible for the worst atrocities in history it plays a significant role in human existence, it also provides order and structure goals for humanity. According to Oxford Dictionary religion could be defined as “a belief in superhuman controlling power in a personal God or gods entitled to obedience and worship”. Through scriptural quotations, human...
    543 Words | 2 Pages
  • Life of Pi: the Correlation Between Science and Religion
    Sharmeel Bhatti Ms. Ciufo ENG-3U1 Wednesday, April, 28, 2010 Life of Pi: Correlation between Science and Religion One of the most important dichotomies that exist amongst today is Science versus Religion. A dichotomy that started in the renaissance era, a period when people started questioning, looking to other horizons, other than religion and truly began to comprehend reality. The theme of Science versus Religion is portrayed in a great deal in the novel Life of Pi. In Life of...
    1,577 Words | 5 Pages
  • Why People Can Become Puppets of Religions
    Religion as we know it , is a belief of faith in some sort of idealistic form of the way of life. It is the belief that something bigger than life exists , and frankly , there is not a lot of things that is bigger than life. We place our belief in trust that we will be saved , brought to a better place from the place where we currently resides in , of pain and sickness , of wealth and poor. It‘s ideal for people as they can believe in something that will save them from what we all fear ; death....
    430 Words | 2 Pages
  • The "War" of Religion and Science Due to Their Similarities and Diff
    The "War" of Religion and Science Due to Their Similarities and Differences Samantha Pavlakos Ms. Smith Period 6 English Term Paper March 13, 2000 Outline Thesis: In the book Phantoms, Dean Koontz relates the "war" between religion and science through the defeat of a supernatural being. I. Religion A. Similarities to science from the theological view B. Differences to science from the theological view 1. Why they are different from the theological view...
    1,374 Words | 5 Pages
  • Hume about natural religion and how to connected to other authors
    Introduction to Philosophy David Hume was aiming at understanding reasonableness and meaningfulness of religion in his work “Dialogues concerning natural religion”. In order to be certain about represented beliefs in religion, Hume illustrated his thoughts through series of dialogues between three main characters. Each character symbolize three different ideologies: Demea shows tolerance to religious beliefs and claims that our understanding is limited to know anything about God; on the other...
    903 Words | 3 Pages
  • existence of evil - 2371 Words
     Evil exists today in the world we live. People will always try to bring good in this world, but evil seems to be in people’s everyday life or in their surroundings. Good and evil are constantly happening to someone or someone is doing good or evil. A lot of philosophers argued that God does not exist because evil exist, and that if there is God then he would have gotten rid of evil. Although other philosophers argue that yes God exist, but so does evil because it is necessary...
    2,371 Words | 6 Pages
  • Free Will, Moral Growth, and Evil by John Hick
    John Hick argues in this writing that the all-powerful, all-knowing, and all-good Christian god is compatible with an abundance of suffering. He offers solutions to the problem of suffering which relies heavily upon a tripartite foundation. Hick divides evil into two: Moral Evil = the evil that human being cause - either to themselves or to each other. And Non-Moral Evil = the evil that is not caused by human activity - natural disasters, etc. He tries to explain that a world without pain and...
    1,646 Words | 4 Pages
  • The verification principle offers no real challenge to religious belief (35)
    “The verification principle offers no real challenge to religious belief.” Discuss [35] The verification principle is a significant concept used by many philosophers in order to determine whether a religious statement is meaningful or not. This was highly influenced by logical positivism: group of 20th century philosophers called the Vienna circle and was then further developed by British philosopher A.J Ayer. Religious language refer to statements such as ‘God exists’ and ‘God loves me’....
    989 Words | 3 Pages
  • Evil and Omnipotence - 984 Words
    In J.L. Mackie’s “Evil and Omnipotence,” he argues against the existence of God. He uses the standpoint that God cannot be omnipotent, omnibenevolent, and evil can still exist. Omnipotent means all-powerful and that God is capable of anything. Omnibenevolent means all-good or that everything God does is good and no evil comes from him. However, evil exists in the world, where some believe in God. How is it possible for God to be all good and yet evil exist in the world? The imperative answer...
    984 Words | 3 Pages
  • J.L. Mackie - 494 Words
    J. L Mackie Introduction Mackie’s argument The proposed solution to be discussed and Mackie’s response to it is the claim that ‘evil is due to human free will’ and as such it cannot be attributed to God. Evil should instead be attributed to the free actions of individuals, the power of which has been endowed upon them by God. While it is acknowledged that there exists evil in the world, as a result of some human free will, it is claimed that freedom of will is a more valuable good than...
    494 Words | 2 Pages
  • Faith or Reason? - 1151 Words
    Critical Paper 3 Fides et Ratio, One or Both? The Middle Ages saw a period in time that was deeply rooted in Christianity. Almost every aspect of life was monitered and ruled by the Church. This period in time also saw the emergence of men beginning to question whether the existence of God can be proved by faith , reason, or as Thomas Aquinas insists, by both faith and reason. There were differing opinions of this matter in both scholarly and religious circles. Faith is what all...
    1,151 Words | 3 Pages
  • the augustine theodicy - 468 Words
    The Augustinian theodicy is a type of Christian theodicy designed to respond to the evidential problem of evil. As such, it attempts to explain the probability of an omnipotent and omnibenevolent (or all-powerful and perfectly loving) God amid evidence of evil in the world. A number of variations of this kind of theodicy have been proposed throughout history, but their similarities were first described by John Hick, who classified them as Augustinian. They typically assert that God is perfectly...
    468 Words | 2 Pages
  • Disclaiming the Argument from Evil
    It is often thought that there is evil in the world, which proves that there is no God. This argument is better known as the Argument from Evil (Sober, 119). In this paper I will argue that the Argument from Evil is termed as bad and can not stand as justifiable due to non-conclusive reasoning for why evil cannot exist. I will provide specific evidence for why a particular premise pertaining to the Argument from Evil can be thrown out resulting in the absence of evidence that can rule out...
    942 Words | 3 Pages
  • Rajiv - 534 Words
    Learning Programme |UNIT |SUBJECT |YEAR | |1 |A Level Religious Studies – The Philosophy of Religion 2 |13 | |TITLE – Body / Soul Distinctions and Life After Death | |LEARNING OBJECTIVES...
    534 Words | 2 Pages
  • What is the Problem of Evil? Is it reasonable to believe a Perfectly Good God, or even a Good God, if there is suffering in the world?
    What is the Problem of Evil? Is it reasonable to believe a Perfectly Good God, or even a Good God exists if there is suffering in the world? John L. Mackie claims that theorists are irrational because as an all good omnipotent being cannot allow evil to exist. Mackie says, “In,its simplest form the problem is this: God is omnipotent; God is wholly good; and yet evil exists” (Feinberg & Shaffer-Landau, 2013, p. 101). He expounds by saying if any two of these statements are believed to...
    1,614 Words | 4 Pages
  • Donovan Implications - 2251 Words
    We laugh about the person who says, ‘I know I’m right; don’t confuse me with arguments’. And yet there are times when we find ourselves wanting to say that too. For there are situations in which we feel sure that we know something, even though if asked to give a good argument to back up our claim we are at a loss to know quite how to do so. ‘I know you’re the person I spoke to on the bus yesterday.’ ‘I know I have two hands.’ ‘I know it is wrong to let that child starve.’ ‘I know that six minus...
    2,251 Words | 6 Pages
  • Aristotle - 1701 Words
    The study question • Translate and/or explain the following terms: aesity, arêtê, endoxa, ergon, eudaimonia, peccatum, telos, virtus, vitium – Arêtê: Greek for virtue, or excellence – Virtus and vitium: Latin for virtue and vice – Endoxon (endoxa): Greek, reputable opinion(s) • Ergon: Greek, function/characteristic activity – • Eudaimonia: Greek, happiness, well being • – Peccatum: Latin, sin • – Telos: Greek, end, aim • Discuss and/or apply the following concepts: doctrine...
    1,701 Words | 6 Pages
  • ‘Religious Experience Can Be Used as Evidence for the Existence of God’
    ‘Religious experience can be used as evidence for the existence of God’ A religious experience is an encounter with God when you experience transcendent reality and it you cannot will it to happen. A direct religious experience refers to events where God reveals him/herself directly to the person having the experience. The experience is not chose or willed by the person; the person experiences or observes God in some way. An indirect religious experience refers to experiences, thoughts or...
    1,549 Words | 4 Pages
  • For What Reason Is the Problem of Evil a Problem for Religious Believers?
    a)For what reason is the Problem of Evil a problem for religious believers? (9) Probably the most powerful reason against the existence of The Classical God of Theism (hereafter referred to as God) is evil and suffering in the world. The problem of evil is an ‘a posterori’ argument, established from experience based on empirical senses. It is also synthetic as evil and suffering can be seen around us daily. There are a number of possible reasons for the problem of evil and why it causes a...
    650 Words | 2 Pages
  • God's Omnipotence - 2171 Words
    Some people refer God as the Omnipotent, that is to say a being that has unlimited power, and is able to do everything. God has four different attributes, he is omniscient, simple, eternal and omnipotent. The latter raises some difficulties, and paradoxes. In a first part I will show how omnipotence can be defined differently, how radical omnipotence differs with limited omnipotence and the issue with logic. Then I will show how God’s omnipotence raises some paradoxes and contradictions, by...
    2,171 Words | 6 Pages
  • Why God Allows Evil
    Why God Allows Evil Swinburne defends the view that the existence of evil in the world is consistent with the existence of an omnipotent, perfectly good God. Not only are they consistent, he argues, but the amount of good in the world requires the possibility of substantial evil. He begins his argument by distinguishing moral evil (which comes from humans acting in morally bad ways) from natural evil (pain and suffering that comes from anything other than human action with predictable outcome),...
    456 Words | 2 Pages
  • Proof for God's Existence - 2152 Words
    1. The UTRUM: "Whether or not it is the case that there is proof for God's existence." 2. The VIDETUR: "It seems that the existence of God can be proven in five ways by the Cosmological Argument." Saint Thomas Aquinas, put forth his own theory on the existence of God. In his text "Whether God Exists", he stated that through his five arguments he could prove God's existence. His five arguments are from motion, from first efficient cause, from possibility and necessity, from...
    2,152 Words | 6 Pages
  • The Influence of Atheism in the Enlightenment - 2237 Words
    The Influence of Atheism on the Age of the Enlightenment While skepticism and doubt have had a presence in human thought for nearly as long as religious faith has existed, they have had a place within religious thought rather than in opposition to it for the vast majority of their existence. Doubt was generally employed by religious thinkers for the purpose of strengthening and explaining their faith, as can be seen in the numerous “proofs” for the existence of God formulated by the great...
    2,237 Words | 6 Pages
  • Religon to Me - 1727 Words
    Religion to Me Tabitha J Smith PHI 208 Ethics and Moral Reasoning March 7, 2013 Instructor Monica Allen Religion to Me The following term paper is my views on religion and how it’s different from many other individuals’ views on this subject. How I know Gods existence is a fact for me and why I don’t need proof of his existence. Looking at several religions that my family has been a part of as well as I have been to show the difference in religions. Is Religion and Science in...
    1,727 Words | 5 Pages
  • A)Explain Irenaeus' Theodicy. B)"Reasoned arguments cannot account for the amount of evil in the world" Discuss
    A) Explain Irenaeus' Theodicy The Irenaeus Theodicy, often called Soul Making, is a counterpart to Augustine's Theodicy, yet it is also and opposing argument. While Augustine stated that evil came from humans and Adam in Genesis, Irenaeus proposes that evil is opposing the human races' bid to become one with God. Irenaeus'theodicy differs from Augustine's, as it is more in the sense that God created evil, whereas Augustine described its existence to be more of a mistake. Yet some of Irenaeus...
    935 Words | 3 Pages
  • Faith Seeking Understanding - 1021 Words
    Faith Seeking Understanding - St. Anselm The most striking theme in Anselm's Proslogion, or faith seeking understanding, is the idea that in order to prove God's existence one must first have faith in Him, and only then will one be able to truly understand and appreciate God's existence. Anselm argues for this eloquently, "I do not seek to understand that I may believe, but I believe in order to understand. For this also I believe, that unless I believed, I should not understand" (Ch.1...
    1,021 Words | 3 Pages
  • Critically Assess With Reference To William James The Argument From Religious
    Critically assess, with reference to William James, the argument from religious experience. A religious experience is a subjective experience which is interpreted within a religious framework. Refer to cases where a person encounters God in a direct way. Otto said the central element of direct was an ‘apprehension of the wholly other’, called the numinous. This means the world that is beyond the physical observable universe in which we live. They are experiences of the wholly other; completely...
    914 Words | 3 Pages
  • : Does the Existence of Suffering Prove That God Does Not Exist? Does It Make It Unlikely That God Exists?
    The argument of evil is one of the most contradicting arguments in the philosophy of religion. This argument states that if evil exists how and why can God exist as well? The traditional theist believes that the definition of God is some superior being who is omnibenevolent, omnipotent and omniscient. This sums up to a being who is all good, loving, powerful and knowing, a being of such greatness is also known as God. Although this definition does create much problems to the argument of evil,...
    1,523 Words | 4 Pages
  • John Hick and the Problem of Evil
    I am writing on John Hick’s piece entitled There Is a Reason Why God Allows Evil. In the selection Hick explains a theodicy, a justification of God’s goodness because of evil, the soul-making view of life in this defense of God’s way in the face of evil. The dilemma of the problem of evil is, if God is perfectly loving he must wish to abolish evil. If evil exists then God cannot be all perfectly loving. Hick’s theodicy, the soul-making view, states that God intentionally placed this evils on...
    541 Words | 2 Pages
  • 500 Word Summary Hicks Theodicy
    500 word summary of Hicks theodicy John Hick is a modern theologian who developed his theodicy based on an argument originally put forward by St Irenaeus. Hick’s theodicy is a form of the free will defense with a few particular developments such as his concept of soul making, mans epistemic distance from God and the concept of universal salvation. Irenaeus’ original theory is based on his interpretation of Genesis 1:26 ‘Let us make man in our image, after our likeness’. From this Irenaeus...
    587 Words | 2 Pages
  • Augustine & Aquinas: the Root of Evil
    Thomas Aquinas and Augustine: The Problem and cause of Evil Zerrrouk(PN) In this paper, I will compare Augustine’s views on the problem of evil, and Thomas Aquinas’ view on The Cause of Evil. I will compare the views of both of these philosophers by picking out the similarities and the differences. I will conclude with my own opinion, and what one I think is the most viable as a probable case. For Augustine, the problem of evil can be phrased in a few several ways. One approach...
    1,444 Words | 4 Pages
  • Exploratory Essay - 2687 Words
    When I was getting older, I’ve always had my doubt about religion. I have a question that how people have and choose their religion. Even though Korea have provided a background for Confucianism for many thousands of years, most of people believe in the Christian religion and very popular with it. There are also lots of pseudo-religions that are trying to cheat other people in order to get money. So while living for about 20 years in Korea, most of people who are on the wrong way forced me to...
    2,687 Words | 7 Pages
  • Do You Believe The United States Is Becoming More Secularized Or More Fundamentalist
    1. Do you believe the United States is becoming more secularized or more fundamentalist? Comparing your generation to that of your parents or grandparents, what differences do you see in the relationship between religion and society? What would popular media have you believe is the state of religion in the United States today? In the United States today I see more megachurches than smaller, intimate churches that were common when I was growing up. I do not see this as a bad thing, due to...
    463 Words | 2 Pages
  • Richard Swinburne's "The Problem of Evil": God's Existence
    Richard Swinburne's "The Problem of Evil": God's Existence Philosophers have looked for ways to explain God's existence for centuries. One such argment that the believer must justify in order to maintain the possibility of God's existence is the problem of evil. In his essay, "The Problem of Evil," by Richard Swinburne, the author attempts to explain how evil can exist in a world created by an omniscient, omnipotent, omnibenevolent Being, namely God. Swinburne uses to free-will defense...
    2,109 Words | 5 Pages
  • SyllabusIP - 1163 Words
    PHILOSOPHY 1010 SYLLABUS—SPRING, 2015 Instructor​ : Daniel A. Krasner. Office​ : CN 303F Phone​ : (303)556­5129 Office Hours​ : MW 11:00am­12:15pm, TR 12:30­1:45pm, and by appointment Email​ : ​ dkrasner@msudenver.edu Texts​ :​ The System of Nature​ , Vol. 1, Baron D’Holbach; ​ Meditations on First Philosophy​ , René Descartes; ​ Natural Theology​ , William Paley, and various papers on electronic reserve. To find ...
    1,163 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Existence of God - 1241 Words
    1. Interests “Sixthly, he would be surprised to hear that the mechanism of the watch was no proof of contrivance, only a motion to induce the mind to think so.” (Page 56) William Paley confidently suggests that there must have been a designer to make such a complex piece of machinery due to the undeniable fact that, to make something so complex, a well thought out plan is needed. A watch has intricate components that have a distinct shape and position within the watch. According to Paley,...
    1,241 Words | 4 Pages
  • Existence of God and Evil - 736 Words
    The Existence of Evil and God In this paper I will argue that the existence of evil does not prove that a God does not exist. For many people the existence of evil and suffering is their number one objection to the existence of God. At times the evil that we see is so pointless. The evil in our world is of such an unspeakable nature that it is difficult at times to fathom what possible purpose could it serve. It is difficult for us to understand why God would allow some things to happen,...
    736 Words | 2 Pages
  • Why Allow ? - 868 Words
    Why does God allow evil? This excerpt was written by Richard Swinburne, which overall talks about his beliefs concerning God. His theistic view on the subject can strongly be seen through his writing. Ultimately, theism is the belief that there is one god who is the ruler of the world and the universe. Richard Swinburne is the leading advocate of a theistic point of view. His main message was to answer the question “Why does God allow evil?” and I believe he did a great job describing his...
    868 Words | 3 Pages
  • ‘Religious experiences do not provide convincing proof of the existence of God’. Examine and evaluate this claim (30 marks)
    Religious experiences cannot be explained empirically and tend to take place within a context of religious expectancy. Such experiences may be individual, in which a person becomes aware of the presence of the divine; or corporate, in which a gathering of people experiences feelings beyond expression – the ineffable. St Teresa of Avila described her experiences as: “God established himself in the interior of this soul in such a way, that when I return to myself, it is wholly impossible for me...
    760 Words | 2 Pages
  • philo - 1194 Words
    PHL101.08 Introduction to Philosophy Page 1 of 3 Paper Assignment Write a paper, following all of the instructions below. I encourage every student to submit a draft of the assigned paper by April 15th but the submission of a draft is not obligatory. The final paper is due at the end of the last class on Tuesday, May 13th. Any paper submitted after the end of the class on May 13th but by the end of the final exam on May 22nd will count only 20% instead of 25% towards your course...
    1,194 Words | 5 Pages
  • Atheism Study - 713 Words
    Kyle Miner Mr. Mafi English 3-4 ACC/Pd. 6 5/30/2012 Atheism Atheism is the absence of a belief in a God or gods. Atheists reject all other religions and question the existence of a god. Atheists believe that religion hinders society, as well as limits the exploration of science. Frank Zindler believes that religion has corrupted our ideas of right and wrong and is bad for society. Michael Buckley however believes that Atheists have wrongly accused different religions of being irrational...
    713 Words | 3 Pages
  • A comparison of Augustinian Theodicy and Irenaean Theodicy
    The problem of evil is a significant and enduring philosophical and theological debate. A question is often raised and discussed: if God is both all-loving and all-powerful, then how can evils-including natural evil and moral evil---exist in our world? In response to the charge that the evils of the world are incompatible with God's omnipotence and perfect goodness, the word"theodicy" is coined to deal with the problem of evil. Usually it is an attempt to show that it is possible to affirm the...
    1,488 Words | 4 Pages
  • Explain the Argument from Religious Experience for the Existence of God
    “Explain the argument from religious experience for the existence of God.”30 marks Expect different forms of the argument from religious experience, e.g. inductive argument, direct awareness, cumulative argument. Also expect reference to Swinburne’s principle of credulity and principle of testimony. Maximum Level 2 if summary of types of religious experience with no reference to argument for God. ------------------------------------------------- Level 7 for one fully developed argument, or...
    450 Words | 2 Pages
  • Religon and Politics - 1922 Words
    Running head: RELIGION AND POLITICS Religion and Politics: A survey Investigation Abstract A study was conducted on the relationship between religion and politics. 16 students (8 male, 8 female) were surveyed on the campus of Morgan State University. The purpose of the study was to learn about the influence of religion in the respondents’ childhood. In addition, the study was concerned with whether the respondents saw religious affiliation as an important...
    1,922 Words | 10 Pages
  • Why I Don't Believe in God
    Why I Do Not Believe in God In this paper, I will formally and philosophically discuss the arguments posed by Thomas Aquinas and use my own personal opinions and experiences to explain my disagreements with Aquinas and why I do not believe in the existence of God. Whether or not God exists is an argument that has been ongoing since some of the earliest philosophers took it up hundreds of years ago. Many philosophers have stated arguments on this topic, from Thomas Aquinas to David Hume to St....
    597 Words | 2 Pages
  • Literature Review: Atheism & Performance
    Because our society is mostly Christian, most of the entertainment industry caters to that idea. Theatre has made references to Christianity throughout centuries; however no one has performed atheism. To prove this notion, it is important to prove Christianity in theatre really exists to begin with. In "The Laughing Dead and the Lively (or was it lovely?) Virgin," the authors trace the relationships between theatre, ritual, circus and Christianity (Bosque 1). It examines the New Circus theatre...
    2,253 Words | 6 Pages
  • Mount Saint Helens and Ecological Succession
    Throughout history, great importance has been placed on the existence of God. Every civilization through time has sought some sort of reassurance that their is a higher being the watches over humanity. The evidence of this belief can be seen in the tombs of the Egyptians, in the sculptures of the Greeks and in the customs of the African tribes, among many other cultures. It seems that the existence of a deity is something that every culture comes to accept at some time or another. In "Would...
    2,647 Words | 8 Pages
  • critically expose the problem of evil
    EMMANUEL SAGWETE (916) DPL 314 PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION FR. A. RUTSVIGA 28 OCTOBER 2010 Critically expose the problem of evil. Evil is a privation of the good. The problem of evil “arises from the paradox of an omnibenevolent, omnipotent deity’s allowing the existence of evil” (Pojman 1987: 151). The Judeo-Christian tradition affirmed that God is omnipotent, omniscient and perfectly good. The same tradition also affirmed the existence of evil. The presence of evil, this privation of the...
    2,271 Words | 6 Pages
  • John Hick's the Problem of Evil
    JOHN HICK’S THE PROBLEM OF EVIL I. John Hick discusses in his essay The Problem of Evil, the objections to the belief in the existence of God is the presence of evil in the world. He begins by posing the traditional challenge to theism in the form of the dilemma: That if God was perfectly loving, he must wish to abolish evil, and being all powerful, is able to perfectly do so as he will its. He then proceeds to present some views regarding this issue, giving insights from three point of...
    2,551 Words | 6 Pages
  • Religious Studies Edexcel(Problem of Evil and Suffering Notes)
    Natural evil – which is malfunctioning of the natural world, for example disease, earthquakes and famine. Moral evil – which is the result of morally wrong human actions such as murder and war Omnipotent – If God is omnipotent all powerful, he can do anything this means he could create a world free from evil and suffering and he could stop evil and suffering. Problem of evil and suffering Omniscient – If God is omniscient all knowing he must know how to stop evil and suffering Omni...
    262 Words | 1 Page
  • Religious Language: Theology and Falsification
    A. J. Ayer considered all religious language to be meaningless. He came to this conclusion through his Verification principle, which argued that a statement which cannot be verified is meaningless. In Ayer’s own words, “A statement is held to be literally meaningful if and only if it is either analytic or empirically verifiable”. He says that a religious utterance may be emotionally significant to the person saying it, but it is not literally significant. An example of this would be the...
    1,737 Words | 5 Pages
  • Evil, The Problem - 809 Words
    The Problem of Evil To present the topic of “the problem with evil,” without acknowledging there is a God can be confusing. I think one of the best questions that you could ask is, why does God allow evil being a perfect and loving God (Elwell, pg 413 There are different types of evil that are allowed in this world. The first is moral evil, which began in the garden of Eden when Eve ate the fruit off the tree and deliberately disobeyed God in an act of sin and evil (Gen. 3)(Elwell, pg...
    809 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Problem of EvilSaint Leo University
    The Problem of Evil: Evil and Omnipotence The argument of whether God exists is an age-old debate, both sides attempting to prove their viewpoint, but neither having factual proof. Those that argue for the existence of God claim that He is wholly good, omnipotent and omniscient. However, if that were true and God did possess all three of these attributes, how is it that evil exists in the world? There is pain and suffering, crime and natural disasters that occur daily. With that being said,...
    690 Words | 2 Pages
  • Big Paper 1 - 1625 Words
    Name: Theona O’Brien Date: 2/22/2015 Course: HUM 1533-200556 Word count: 1,662 Title: The Existence of God 1. Introduction and Thesis It is human nature to question our existence. Some believe it was God who created our existence, and others rely on science. This has been an ongoing debate since life on earth. This paper argues that it is not possible to prove either way whether if the traditional God exists or not. There are no credentials to prove God’s existence or lack of; it is merely a...
    1,625 Words | 4 Pages
  • Free-Will Defense - 653 Words
    Free-Will Defense The Free Will Defense is an attempted solution to the problem of moral evil. Human beings are gifted with free will by God as a condition for genuine morality, trust, love, and the like, though it also makes possible the introduction of moral evil into the world. There are various questions that are asked with the question of God. Many ask questions like- why did God give humans the ability of free will knowing that they will abuse it? Is free will a condition for real...
    653 Words | 2 Pages
  • Theodicy: Free Will and Natural Evil
    Theodicy A theodicy is simply a justification of God’s ways. Theists are generally compelled to express a theodicy in response to the unfortunate, painful, evil events and circumstances found in our world. A theodicy is necessary only if we believe in a God who is inherently good, thus requiring an explanation of the apparent discontinuity between a good God and evil in the world. In order to express my own theodicy, I will discuss the forms of evil in the world and their various...
    1,951 Words | 6 Pages
  • Alienation in "Black Boy" - 1145 Words
    Carlos Hernandez Eng. 111 Prof. Weitz 02/18/2009 Causes of Alienation in Black Boy Black Boy demonstrates how the protagonist, Richard Wright, alienated himself from his community because he did not share the same religious and societal beliefs practiced by his community and felt that the questions he had about everyday life would not be answered if he conformed to his degraded position in society. Richard...
    1,145 Words | 3 Pages
  • Knowing God - 1107 Words
    Knowing God Systematic Theology I Knowing God The study of God has been taken place for many centuries. There have been various well known theologians that have spent a life time studying theology. What is theology? Theology is the study of God. It has been a desire for many Christians to know God. It is a true fact that no one will ever know God fully. “No one knows the Son except the Father and no one knows the Father except the Son and those to whom the Son...
    1,107 Words | 4 Pages
  • Philo - 309 Words
    1. Metaphysics Metaphysics is the study of “reality.” More specifically it is the study of reality that is beyond the scientific or mathematical realms. The term “metaphysics” itself literally means “beyond the physical.” The metaphysical issues most discussed are the existence of God, the soul, and the afterlife. 2. Epistemology - This philosophy study concerns human knowledge: what knowledge is, what the conditions are which make human knowledge possible and the extent to which human...
    309 Words | 1 Page
  • The Problem of Evil - 646 Words
    The Problem of Evil It is not hard to find evil and suffering in this world. The most common philosophical question that arises in response to such devastation is, “Why would God allow this to happen?” Pain is unmasked, unmistakable evil that is immediately recognizable and impossible to ignore. Pain, as God’s megaphone to rouse a deaf world, is a terrible instrument; it may lead to unrepented rebellion, but it gives the only opportunity the bad man can have for amendment. (3, pg....
    646 Words | 2 Pages
  • Discuss Dr. Faustus as a Tragedy.
    Marlowe constructed the character of Dr. Faustus to represent within himself both characteristics of the Renaissance view of humanity as divinely good and hellishly evil. First, Dr. Faustus is presented as a scholar of all things including divinity, the highest Renaissance scholarly discipline. Then, Faustus is shown as dissatisfied with the limitations of humanity and grasping for unlimited knowledge, which is a Biblical allusion to Adam and Eve who ate of the Tree of Knowledge. Throughout the...
    347 Words | 1 Page
  • Does God Exists? - 920 Words
    The question of whether God exists has for centuries been a topic of debate among philosophers and theologians, believers and non-believers, priests and preachers, and the average man on the street or guests at a party. Many people are unconvinced of the existence of God without having scientific evidence. Others, who already believe in God’s existence through their faith in Him, seek intellectual support to better understand their faith. Both believers and non-believers can find sound, rational...
    920 Words | 3 Pages
  • Does God Exist - 1417 Words
    Does God exist? Does God exist? This seemingly simple question is in fact loaded with a myriad of twists and turns that scientists and theologians have debated for years without reaching an accepted conclusion. Part of the problem lies in the many definitions of God. Traditionally it is accepted that God is a supreme being, infallible, perfect, and existing outside of the material world of humanity. It is this definition that is generally used when debating God's existence. There have been...
    1,417 Words | 4 Pages
  • Short Essay 1 Bailey Jesse
     Name: __________Jesse S. Bailey_________________ Writing Style Used: __________________APA________________ (e.g., Turabian, APA, or MLA) Course and Section Number: _____________THEO 202 D15_________________ (e.g. THEO 202 B01) Essay on Topic [e.g., Hamartiology: The Problem of Evil (Theodicy)] [Write your essay here, which must contain 600–800 words for the first 3 Short Essays.] Word count: [Post the word count of just your actual essay, not including title.]...
    784 Words | 3 Pages
  • The weaknesses of the Ontological argument give support to Atheism. Discuss this statement
    The weaknesses of the Ontological Argument give support to Atheism. Discuss this claim (12 marks) Anselm’s ontological argument described in part (a), was refuted in his own lifetime, by Gaunilo, who demonstrated in a reduction ad absurdum of his own, that if the logic of the argument were applied to things other than God, it led to invalid conclusions. Gaunilo didn’t identify any specific fault with the argument, but argued that something must be wrong with it, because if there wasn’t...
    823 Words | 3 Pages
  • Ethics of Homosexuality - 851 Words
     Homosexuality Homosexuality has always been a controversial topic of ethical discussion. The morality of the subject depends completely upon a person’s views. A person is often swayed one way or another and religion often plays a very large role on the subject. There are those who believe in the divine command theory and those who believe in the natural law theory. In order to properly understand either theory it is important to know the meaning behind each. According to...
    851 Words | 2 Pages
  • Analysis of Anselm's Ontological Argument and the Argument from Evil
    Roxx Alvarado Professor Aaron Wilson PHI2010 8 September 2011 Analysis to Anselm’s Ontological Argument and the Argument from Evil The debate of the existence of God had been active since before the first philosopher has pondered the question. Anselm’s Ontological Argument was introduced during the 11th century and had stood deductively valid until the 18th century. Then there are the arguments to aim disprove God, such as the Argument from Evil. The Ontological argument is an...
    1,434 Words | 4 Pages
  • Hamartiology - 788 Words
    Writing Style Used: MLA Hamartiology: The Problem of Evil (Theodicy) The problem of evil is not a new issue to be considered or questioned. Rather, philosophers, theologians, and the common man have questioned this since evil entered the world. Hamartiology is simply the study of sin, how it came to be and how it affects humans. In this discussion, we will examine why bad things happen and why evil exists in our world today. Simply stated, the problem of evil is dynamic, but acknowledges the...
    788 Words | 3 Pages
  • Evaluate Atheism as a Philosophical Perspective
    Evaluate Atheism as a philosophical perspective Atheism, meaning 'a belief without God' is a belief that is becoming increasingly popular in the Western society. Essentially, some atheists claim to be anti-religion and reject religious dogmas; however, I should first establish that there are two different types of atheists. The first is known as positive atheism where the individual not only refute the arguments for the existence of God but also goes a step further to develop arguments. The...
    1,498 Words | 4 Pages
  • Explain the reasons for the rise in atheism
    Explain the reasons for the rise of atheism There are many different reasons that are seen as factors for the rise of atheism. However, many peoples description of atheism is different. Some people think of it is as not believing in a God at all, but others see it as being confused about your religion and not having strong beliefs about one certain religion. The reasons for the rise of atheism range from being scientific to belief in other religions. One of the first reasons for a rise in...
    1,130 Words | 3 Pages
  • Does god Exsist - 933 Words
    Does God Exist? It is one of the most asks questions around the world still to this day. A controversial topic which doesn’t have an answer. No way to prove, or disprove the concept that there is someone or something else that has created the universe we live in. But what is the definition of God? The definition of God is that He is omniscient (all knowing), omnipotent (all powerful), and omnibenevolent (morally perfect and all loving). This definition is most used in Philosophy of Religion and...
    933 Words | 3 Pages
  • Hans Mol - 7433 Words
    Nanzan University The Identity Model of Religion: How It Compares with Nine Other Theories of Religion and How It Might Apply to Japan Author(s): Hans Mol Source: Japanese Journal of Religious Studies, Vol. 6, No. 1/2, Proceedings of the 1978 Tokyo Meeting of the Conference Internationale de Sociologie Religieuse (Mar. - Jun., 1979), pp. 1138 Published by: Nanzan University Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/30233189 . Accessed: 25/09/2011 12:00 Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates...
    7,433 Words | 27 Pages
  • The Problem of Evil - 2698 Words
    A Critical Analysis on the Problem of Evil (Theistic Approach) Thesis Statement: The problem of evil is inadequate to disprove the existence of God. The Problem of Evil coined by Epicurus states that: “Either God wants to eradicate evil, and cannot; or he can, but does not want to. If he wants to, but cannot, he is impotent. If he can but does not want to he is wicked. If God can eradicate evil, and He wants to do it, why is there evil in the world?” This problem has long bothered many...
    2,698 Words | 7 Pages
  • Free Will and the Existence of God
    Within our society, it is usually assumed that we have free will. If you were to ask a random person on the street, they would most likely respond to the question, "Do you have free will or is there Fate" with the affirmation that they make their own decisions, because God gives us free will. Yet in the assumption of the fact that God gave us free will, there is a logical disconnect that most people ignore. How can God exist in a world where we can change the outcome of a situation in a way that...
    2,579 Words | 6 Pages
  • Managing Religious Conflict in Therapy
    Running Head: MANAGING RELIGIOUS CONFLICT Managing Religious Conflict within Psychotherapy Ryan Hagen UMASS Lowell Abstract This paper discusses the relationship of religion and psychology within the setting of interpersonal dynamic psychotherapy. It raises the question of whether and to what extent religion should be included in a therapeutic setting. Varying perspectives on this issue are reviewed, followed by an examination of the consequences of addressing religion within...
    1,728 Words | 5 Pages
  • Tom's of Maine - 325 Words
    To what extent is Tom Chappell’s spiritual perspective responsible for the company’s organizational culture and the company’s successes/failures? Tom and Kate Chappell believe it is crucial not to compromise your beliefs in order to turn a profit. The Chappell’s expressed strong personal values of respect for both people and nature. Through conflicts between the companies’ new talent and the Chappell’s, Tom enrolled at Harvard Divinity School where he immersed himself in writings of great moral...
    325 Words | 1 Page

All Philosophy of religion Essays