Oscar Wilde Essays & Research Papers

Best Oscar Wilde Essays

  • Oscar Wilde - 307 Words
     Jovanska Martínez Full Name: Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde Birth Date: October 16, 1854 Birth Place: Dublin, Ireland. Death Date: November 30, 1900 Death Place: Paris, France. Education: Portora Royal School, Magdalen College, Trinity College. Oscar Wilde is an Irish writer best known for the novel The Picture of Dorian Gray and the play The Importance of Being Earnest, as well as for his...
    307 Words | 2 Pages
  • Oscar Wilde - 1642 Words
    The life of Oscar Wilde is nothing special; it is actually more of a statement. Oscar Wilde lived to make a point. During the time he was alive he made many mistakes and had many triumphs. Oscar Wilde spoke his mind and didn’t let anything stop him from doing the things he wanted. Wilde is a literary genius that used his life experience in his writings. Oscar Wilde’s education, experiences and personal life helped form him into the acclaimed author he is today. Oscar Fingal O’Flahertie Wills...
    1,642 Words | 5 Pages
  • Oscar Wilde - 550 Words
    My full name is Oscar Fingal O’Flahertie Wills Wilde and I am applying for the spot as any of the following open spots as: Author, poet, or a dramatist. I was born in Dublin, Ireland on October 16, 1854. My father is Sir William Wilde who is a very well-known surgeon. My mother is Jane Francesca Elgee Wilde and she is a poet who worked under the nickname Speranza. I also have a lot of siblings. Five of them! Their names are Henry, Emily, William, Mary, and Isola. Due to my mother’s literary...
    550 Words | 2 Pages
  • Oscar Wilde - 3634 Words
    Thomas Kauth Ms Gregori English February 24, 2013 Biography Oscar Wilde was born on October 16, 1854 in Dublin . Oscar Wilde is best known for the novel The Picture of Dorian Gray and the play The Importance of Being Earnest, as well as for his infamous arrest and imprisonment for being gay. Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde was born on October 16, 1854 in Dublin , Ireland . His father, William Wilde, was an acclaimed doctor who had been knighted for his work as medical advisor for the...
    3,634 Words | 10 Pages
  • All Oscar Wilde Essays

  • Oscar Wilde - 1335 Words
    BIOGRAPHY -OF -OSCAR WILDE: Born on October 16, 1854 in Dublin, Irish writer Oscar Wilde is best known for the novel The Picture of Dorian Gray and the play The Importance of Being Earnest, as well as for his infamous arrest and imprisonment for being gay. Early Life Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde was born on October 16, 1854 in Dublin, Ireland. His father, William Wilde, was an acclaimed doctor who was knighted for his work as medical advisor for the Irish censuses. William Wilde...
    1,335 Words | 4 Pages
  • Oscar Wilde - 4663 Words
    Semey state university named after Shakarim Students independent work Theme: “Oscar Wilde” Performed:Arykova Aigerim Checked: Shalbaeva A. Zh. Semey 2014 CONTENTS Introduction………………………………………………………………3 1. Early life……………………………………………………………….4 2. Education……………………………………………………………...4 3. Prose writing …………………………………………………………..6 4. The Picture Of Dorian Gray…………………………………………..8 5. The end of the 19th century…………………………………………...9 6. Death…………………………………………………………………..11...
    4,663 Words | 13 Pages
  • Oscar Wilde - 1047 Words
    Oscar Wilde Oscar Wilde was an Irish writer that lived during the Victorian era. His writing was very diverse, ranging from novels, plays, and poetry to children’s stories. His witty idioms still make one chuckle even today. In his time, Oscar Wilde was radical for his writings, lifestyle, innovation, and influence; but remains relevant to this day. Oscar Wilde embraced the Aesthetic movement, which believes that life is improved by surrounding yourself with beautiful objects, including...
    1,047 Words | 3 Pages
  • Oscar Wilde - 3112 Words
    Oscar Wilde INTRODUCTION: THE AESTHETICISM. The term " aestheticism" derives from Greek and means: "Perceiving through senses". It was also for the Romantic culture, in fact the movement has its roots in the Romanticism, but, at the same time, it signs a turn: now tartist, or better the aesthete, has to feel the sensations but also live them in his life. The message of the aestheticism is: "Living the beauty!" The figure of the aesthete presents some corrispondences with the French figure,...
    3,112 Words | 9 Pages
  • Oscar Wilde - 447 Words
    Oscar Wilde, one of the greatest literary showmen of the English 19th century, was born in Dublin on October 16th. He was also the most outstanding representative of Decadence. He was the son of a well-known Irish physician. In his youth, he was very much influenced by his mother, who was a highly educated woman. She wrote poetry and was an ardent Irish patriot. Her scornful attitude towards the hypocrisy of British bourgeois morals was probably responsible for the disrespect that characterized...
    447 Words | 2 Pages
  • oscar wilde - 707 Words
    Similarities and Differences of Oscar Wilde’s Literary Works There can be found many similarities and differences between these literary pieces. The Picture of Dorian Gray can be found as the twin of The Importance of Being Earnest, while on the other hand Earnest seems to be deriding Dorian Gray. Both similarities and differences can be found through the characters and the plots various twist and turns. The various characters provide the backbone for both works. Both the novel and the play...
    707 Words | 2 Pages
  • Oscar Wilde - 496 Words
    Born on October 16, 1854 in Dublin, Irish writer Oscar Wilde is best known for the novel The Picture of Dorian Gray and the play The Importance of Being Earnest, as well as for his infamous arrest and imprisonment for being gay. Beginning in 1888, while he was still serving as editor of Lady's World, Wilde entered a seven-year period of furious creativity, during which he produced nearly all of his great literary works. Around the same time that he was enjoying his greatest literary success,...
    496 Words | 2 Pages
  • Oscar wilde - 1524 Words
    The Unparalleled Contributions of an Eminent Poet The world famous poet, Oscar Wilde, was born on October 18, 1854 in Dublin, Ireland. What would the imaginative world of poetry and its captive audience have missed without the sensitive voice of Wilde to make us question the meaning of art? Due to the positive and negative influences on his eccentric life, Oscar Wilde preserved to become a recognized writer with an authentic voice. Childhood Oscar Wilde had an...
    1,524 Words | 5 Pages
  • Oscar Wilde, Woman - 5327 Words
    OSCAR WILDE - Biography Oscar Wilde was an Anglo-Irish playwright, novelist, poet, and critic. He is regarded as one of the greatest playwrights of the Victorian Era. In his lifetime he wrote nine plays, one novel, a number of poems, short stories, and essays. He was born on October the 16th, 1894 in Dublin to Sir William Wilde and his wife Jane. Oscar's mother, Lady Jane Francesca Wilde was a successful poet and journalist also (Gregory Brdnik 2012). Oscar had an elder brother, Willie, and a...
    5,327 Words | 13 Pages
  • oscar wilde anlysis - 525 Words
    Plot Analysis of “The Happy Prince” Oscar Wilde’s “The Happy Prince” begins by introducing the statue of the Happy Prince. Then the swallow is introduced as well, and there follows the encounter of the two characters: when the swallow is about to sleep between the feet of the statue, the tears of the Happy Prince falls on the swallow, and that is how they meet and interact for the first time. It is also how the Happy Prince begins to request help from the swallow, which is the majority of...
    525 Words | 2 Pages
  • Oscar Wilde "A House of Pomegranates"
    Oscar Wilde wrote himself into history as a sharp and pungent writer and an exceptional personality with a suitable epigram at hand for every occasion. He is, though, perhaps most well-known for his infamous relationship with Lord Alfred Douglas, which resulted in Wilde being sentenced to two years of hard labor for homosexual offences. However, Wilde left to the world not only the fascinating story of his own life, but also a number of literary works in a variety of genres, both fictional and...
    2,203 Words | 6 Pages
  • Oscar Wilde Article - 535 Words
    This article profiles Irish writer Oscar Wilde. Regarded as one of the world's greatest dramatists, Wilde too called the Emerald Isle the land of his birth. As was the case with many scribes of his time, Wilde's works went mostly unnoticed until many years after his death. The genius of Wilde was through his implication of his own moral system and outlandish ways of living. His most famous work, The Importance of Being Earnest, is a twisted moral tale. The story revolves around two men, each...
    535 Words | 2 Pages
  • An Ideal Husband- Oscar Wilde
    An Ideal Husband Oscar Wilde Themes The Rococo Tapestry Act I takes place against the backdrop of a Rococo tapestry, a representation of François Boucher's "Triumph of Love" (1754). The "Triumph" allegorizes the victory of love over power: Venus points to Vulcan's conquered heart, and the god gazes up at her like a love-sick boy. Though the most obvious reading might consider the tapestry as prefiguring the defeat of Mrs. Cheveley and reconciliation of the...
    1,470 Words | 4 Pages
  • Oscar Wilde Compare/Contrast
     Questions are never indiscreet. Answers sometimes are. Affection and companionship were major themes for Society Drama during the 1890s. An established ‘storyline’ of the period was that of domestic life affected by a circumstance, concluding in the affirmation of common ideas: fidelity, duty, forgiveness, etc. Although ‘An Ideal Husband’ adopts these motifs, it also makes fun them through the exaggerated ideas of love and friendship each character represents. The play ‘Lady Windermere’s...
    1,249 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Model Millionaire, Oscar Wilde
    The Model Millionaire,by Oscar Wilde I. Presentation of the story The short story The Model Millionaire is part of the book Lord Arthur Savile's Crime and Other Stories, a collection of short semi-comic mystery stories written by Oscar Wilde and published in 1891. It is a third-person narrative, whose narrator starts the text expressing his opinions and judgments about the characters. Hughie, the main character, is described as a very handsome man, whose beauty is useless, because he is...
    1,378 Words | 4 Pages
  • Oscar Wilde as Dorian Gray
    Oscar Wilde as Dorian Gray ‘I have put too much of myself in it’ (Wilde 12), commented Basil Hallward, a fictional artist, about his newly completed masterpiece. Just like Oscar Wilde, the author of The Picture of Dorian Gray (1890, revised 1891), who put so much of his life into his novel; his experience, surroundings, and the global happenings of his time, strongly influenced the production of the speculative, philosophical, gothic novel. The author’s homosexuality, the ridiculous social...
    1,431 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Works of Oscar Wilde - 1354 Words
    Oscar Wilde is one of the great playwrights and dramatists of the Victorian Age, known for his barbed and clever wit. He is regarded as one of the most proficient and versatile writers of the English language. He is perhaps best known for his sharp and witty rejoinders. Indeed, the playwright spoke in aphorisms on his deathbed when he stated through fevers, "My wallpaper and I are fighting a duel to the death. One or the other of us has to go." His plays continue to dazzle audiences even a...
    1,354 Words | 4 Pages
  • Oscar Wilde: the Artist Not the Sitter
    Oscar Wilde once said, “Every portrait that is painted with feeling is a portrait of the artist, not of the sitter.” This was true in Wilde’s life except he was not painting portraits, but rather creating wonderful literary works of art that people still enjoy today. All of his works portrayed Wilde’s talent and creativity. Oscar Wilde was born on October 16, 1854, to two successful parents, Dr. William Wilde and Jane Francesca Elgee Wilde. Wilde’s father was a successful eye and ear doctor....
    634 Words | 2 Pages
  • Oscar Wilde, Victorian or Anti-Victorian?
    3 October 2012 Oscar Wilde, Victorian or Anti-Victorian? Oscar Wilde was a writer during the end of the Victorian era. This is one of the reasons that it is difficult, and still debated, whether he was a Victorian writer or not. His private life was far from the puritanical image of the Victorian era. The Victorian age was full of rigid sensibilities, while the anti-Victorian movement veered in the complete opposite direction. The anti-Victorians were much more adventurous with sex. There...
    603 Words | 2 Pages
  • Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
    Picture of Dorian Grey – Passage Analysis Chapter 5 Wilde’s description of Sibyl Vane as a caged bird invokes the thought that Dorian’s love for Sibyl has trapped her. There are two instances where the imagery of her entrapment is brought up, “the joy of a caged bird in her voice” and “in her prison of passion” are both statements where the common entity is a sort of cell like set-up for Sibyl. The use of these metaphors is a representation of the confinement Sibyl is in in this relationship,...
    263 Words | 1 Page
  • Oscar Wilde: the Picture of Dorian Gray
    Oscar Wilde: The Picture of Dorian Gray Oscar Wilde was one of the poets who‘s lyrics refused the problems of morality and philosophy which troubled the population during the Victorian era in the nineteenth century, and he found images for his own moods, loves and experience. His work as a dramatist and his legendary name, have given his verses a significant reputation. (Evans, I., 1976, p.114) Wilde’s pleasure in provocation and his examination of different moral perspectives...
    1,339 Words | 4 Pages
  • Oscar Wilde "The Ballad of Reading Gaol"
    ENG205 Literary Analysis: Oscar Wilde The Ballad of Reading Gaol The Ballad of Reading Gaol is not the work that Wilde wrote while imprisoned for moral (in his case, homosexual) offences in 1895; that work was De Profundis, published five years after his death, in 1905 (Damrosh, 1004). The Ballad of Reading Gaol was written after his release and in France, in 1897, though it was published in 1898. His works during this exile were published under the name Sebastian Melmouth. The poem is...
    1,259 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Importance of Being Victorian: Oscar Wilde
    The Importance of Being Victorian: Oscar Wilde “The truth is rarely pure and never simple. Modern life would be very tedious if it were either, and modern literature a complete impossibility” (Wilde 14). As a brilliant writer of the 1800’s, Oscar Wilde devoted the majority of his works towards unveiling the harsh truths of the Victorian society. Leading a life of deception himself, he chose to showcase his distastes for the social injustice he saw around him with unrestrained humor. Being the...
    2,591 Words | 7 Pages
  • The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
    The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde The Picture of Dorian Gray is a novel written by Irish writer, Oscar Wilde. The main character, rich and beautiful Dorian Gray, owns his portrait, which instead of him becomes older and where are traces of sin and mistakes. While Gray becomes uncontrollable and ruthless, his appearance stays youthful and flawless. At the end, in his despair, Gray destroys the picture and himself. The novel gives us a very good lesson – we can do whatever we...
    494 Words | 2 Pages
  • An Analysis of The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
    “Time is not really suspended, even for the novel’s beautiful young hero” In the light of this comment, discuss ways in which Wilde portrays time passing in The Picture Of Dorian Gray. One of the main ways in which Wilde portrays time passing is the ageing and changing of the portrait. Dorian is exceptionally vain and becomes convinced, after a brief conversation with Lord Henry that his most significant characteristics; his youth and attractiveness are slowly going to fade away. The thought...
    349 Words | 1 Page
  • Oscar Wilde the Happy Prince and Other Stories
    Oscar Wilde was an Irish poet, novelist, author of short stories as well as playwright, and it was his comedies which made him famous. In spite of that, it looks like his works remain only a reflection of his great mind. He was always fascinated by the public - for his work he needed immediate reaction. Probably he was a better storyteller than writer. Nevertheless, Oscar Wilde was a very talented student, with great memory. He studied at Trinity College in Dublin and later on in...
    2,516 Words | 7 Pages
  • The Influences of Oscar Wilde The Picture of Dorian Gray
    The Influences of Oscar Wilde Throughout his life Oscar Wilde had many strong influences exerted upon him. During his early childhood his mother influenced him and into college some of his professors and certain philosophers left a substantial impression upon him. Into adulthood these influences leaked out in his writing. These influences gave him ample ideas for writing The Picture of Dorian Gray. Wilde's study of the Hellenistic ideals of Epicurus, his coddled lifestyle as a child and his...
    1,576 Words | 5 Pages
  • The Conflict Between Aestheticism and Morality in Oscar Wilde
    The Conflict Between Aestheticism and Morality in Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray Oscar Wilde prefaces his novel, The Picture of Dorian Gray, with a reflection on art, the artist, and the utility of both. After careful scrutiny, he concludes: “All art is quite useless” (Wilde 4). In this one sentence, Wilde encapsulates the complete principles of the Aesthetic Movement popular in Victorian England. That is to say, real art takes no part in molding the social or moral...
    2,847 Words | 8 Pages
  • The Theme of Decadence in the Picture of Dorian Grey by Oscar Wilde
    The theme of decadence in The Picture of Dorian Grey by Oscar Wilde Staring from the definition found in the dictionary, the decadence is a literary movement especially of late 19th-century France and England characterized by refined aestheticism, artifice, and the quest for new sensations. [1] In decadence, important is not necessarily what is seen, but the hermeneutics: what man feels when he sees the creative result of this feeling. It is the current that requires a...
    1,566 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Picture of Dorian Grayby, Oscar Wilde (Setting, Plot)
    Setting: The novel The Picture of Dorian Gray by, Oscar Wilde is set in London England in the nineteenth century; the setting is credible for many reasons first of all because the setting is not based in a fictional place but a real world place (London England). The setting is also credible because Dorian lives in the upper west side where he lives a life of wealth, lugguary and pleasure. The setting in the novel holds great importance, because of where Dorian lives he is freely able to moove...
    529 Words | 2 Pages
  • Explore how Oscar Wilde opens Act 2 of 'The Importance of Being Earnest'
    Explore how Oscar Wilde Opens Act 2: Upon the opening of Act 2 in The Importance of Being Earnest, Oscar Wilde sets out a rather peaceful looking scene, transporting his audience to Jack’s country estate in Hertfordshire. The act takes off in the Garden at the Manor House, described in the stage directions as ‘an old fashion one, full of roses’ with baskets and chairs set under a large yew tree. With the time of year being July, this all makes up for a somewhat simple Victorian summer...
    964 Words | 3 Pages
  • Sybil Vane's Symbolic Role in "The Portrait of Dorian Gray" by Oscar Wilde
    Sibyl Vane’s Symbolic Role In “The Picture Of Dorian Gray”, By Oscar Wilde Sibyl Vane plays a symbolic role in The Picture of Dorian Gray; moreover, she plays a symbolic role in Dorian Gray’s life. This essay will explore how Sybil’s character initially influences Dorian in a positive way, giving him the motive to turn away from decadence but subsequently brings about his downfall. Recurring themes will be discussed such as the aesthetic and references will be given to show examples of...
    993 Words | 3 Pages
  • Modern Society as a Reflection of the Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
    Traditional gothic fiction was at the height of its popularity during the Victorian era, it exploded in the 1790’s and continued its reign well into the 1800’s. This confrontational style of fiction often blurs the lines of realistic and artificial, forcing readers to challenge their beliefs and surpass the norm. However, the aspect of gothic fiction that was most attractive to the Victorian audience was the way human fears and societal tensions were reflected in the deliberately fictionalised...
    1,451 Words | 5 Pages
  • What Was the Impact of the Oscar Wilde Case on Attitudes to Crime and Punishment
    What was the impact of the Oscar Wilde case on attitudes to crime and punishment? A negative view was held towards homosexuality going as far back as 1553 when ‘The Buggery Act’ came into place instructing that the act of buggery was a capital offence, it was thought of as a sin against nature and therefore should be banned from taking place in society. However, many people had a tolerant view to homosexuality in the idea that as long as it was behind closed doors then it could be ignore,...
    1,056 Words | 3 Pages
  • Functional-Stylistic Peculiarities of Modern English Biographical Prose (on the Basis of Five Biographies of Oscar Wilde)
    Introduction. When people speak about style they usually consider texts of verbal art [cf. 14] and it is believed that on the whole only masters of style deserve special investigation and of course masters of style are usually those who are writing artistic texts. But as is absolutely clear any text is characterized by a certain style [4], and it doesn't matter whether it is good or bad because even if the person is writing in a neutral way [17;18] all the same it is the stylistic...
    36,955 Words | 87 Pages
  • Explore the ways in which Oscar Wilde presents the concept of Duality in ‘A Picture of Dorian Gray’
    Explore the ways in which Oscar Wilde presents the concept of Duality in ‘A Picture of Dorian Gray’ Throughout Wilde’s gothic novel ‘A Picture of Dorian Gray’ it is apparent that juxtaposition is used as a device to highlight the prevalent themes within the novel. The reoccurrence of comparisons highlights the transformations arising within the narrative; however I believe Wilde uses these comparisons to slowly reveal Dorian’s true character as the comparison become increasingly abrasive as...
    1,310 Words | 3 Pages
  • The setting of the two different works Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray & Emily Bronte, Wuthering Heights affect womankind
    The Picture of Dorian Gray written by Oscar Wilde and Wuthering Heights written by Emily Bronte have significant settings – “the height of the Decadent artistic movement of the late nineteenth century” (Shmoop Editorial Team, 2008) and “in the late 1700s and early 1800s” (The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc., 11). This essay will analyze how the setting of Wuthering Heights influences lives of female characters and the setting of The Picture of Dorian Gray and its effects on characters’ thought. In...
    1,008 Words | 3 Pages
  • Relationship between Wilde - 919 Words
    What relationship exists between Wilde’s ‘The Picture of Dorian Gray’ and Will Self’s recent adaptation, and to what extent is Self’s transformation of the original a response to the new social context within which he is writing? The introduction will outline how Wilde’s original version could be read as a story with a moral, drawing on the myth of Narcissus and Goethe’s Faust, and that on a basic level, Self’s text operates in the same way. Referencing Houston A. Baker Junior’s essay “A...
    919 Words | 3 Pages
  • Oscar Wilde’s ‘Selfish Giant’
    Oscar Wilde’s ‘Selfish Giant’ Oscar Wild (1854 – 1900) ‘Selfish Giant’ is one of the short stories beautifully written by Oscar Wilde. Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde (16 October 1854 – 30 November 1900) was an Irish writer and playwright, novelist, poet, and author of short stories. After writing in different forms throughout the 1880s, he became one of London's most popular playwrights in the early 1890s. Today he is remembered for his epigrams, his only novel: The Picture of Dorian...
    1,007 Words | 3 Pages
  • Oscar Wilde's Aestheticism - 336 Words
    Though Oscar Wilde is the incarnation of the aestheticism schools, we can’t afford to ignore the other artists of the aesthetes. It is imperative that we should give a general introduction to aestheticism in the following paragraphs.Aesthetics is a branch of philosophy that studies the principles of beauty especially in art. Aestheticism is the collection of all the fruits of aesthetics.“The word ‘aesthetic’ was first found in Aesthetica, appearing as a Latin word, which is the name of two books...
    336 Words | 1 Page
  • How Does Wilde Establish Atmosphere
    How does Wilde establish atmosphere, characters and the concerns of the text in the first chapter? The opening chapters introduce us to the novel's major protagonists. Wilde characterises Lord Henry, Basil, and Dorian, and provides information that will inform the development of the story. Wilde establishes a sinister atmosphere in chapter one. Walter Payter said that “To burn always with this hard gemlike flame, to maintain this ecstasy, is success in life” – Wilde was a hedonist and reflected...
    722 Words | 2 Pages
  • "The Color of Innocence" about "The Picture of Dorian Gray" by Oscar Wilde. Examines the color white motif in the novel and the way it's meaning evolves.
    The Color of Innocence In the context of "The Picture of Dorian Gray," one of the most noticeable and important motifs is that of the color white and its variants, including, but not limited to, pale and listless. The meaning of this color evolves as the novel progresses, changing in relation to Dorian's character. While the motif may never physically alter in appearance, it succeeds in reversing meaning completely, signifying the great contrast in Dorian's soul between the beginning of the...
    1,315 Words | 4 Pages
  • " Art Is Quite Useless"- Oscar Wild
    In his preface, Oscar Wild dare to say that art is quite useless. "What do you mean art is useless?" was the first thing that came in my mind, "but art has so much meaning: it elevates our awareness of things, questions everything, contextualizes and re-contextualizes ideas, sharpens our appreciation for beauty, thought, and skill, it can define cultures, and is able to capture the essence and spirit of the time in which it’s made". It doesn't have only meaning but it is useful too. It is...
    2,155 Words | 5 Pages
  • Wilde. Take Away the “E”, and That’s Society
    Abby Vie Mr. Flynn A.P. Literature and Composition 3/31/13 Wilde. Take Away The “E”, and That’s Society “Our modern society is engaged in polishing and decorating the cage in which man is kept imprisoned.” The author of this quote, Swami Nirmalananda, was an enlightened anarchist who spread his message about peace and non-violence through letters he wrote to world leaders and followers across the globe. Oscar Wilde expressed his views on the Victorian society...
    1,235 Words | 4 Pages
  • Analysis of Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray
    By Jessica Shelby Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray is a prime example of hedonism, a movement in the late 1800's that claims pleasure to be the prime goal in one's life. The focus of the novel is the beauty of Dorian Gray, his self-destructive search for pleasure, and the corruption of both the lives he has encountered and his own soul. Beauty and pleasure are the focus of all characters and scenes depicted in The Picture of Dorian Gray. Wilde's timeless novel vividly portrays the...
    1,489 Words | 4 Pages
  • Oscar Wilde’s Fairy Tales: a Fantastic Subterfuge
    The note of the perfect personality is not rebellion, but peace. (OscarWilde, The Soul of Man under Socialism) Among all of Wilde’s writings, the fairy tales have successfully passed the censorious eyes of the conservative critics for a long time. Only recently has it been discovered that these fairy tales that have been celebrated as children’s literature are like one of those secret chambers of riches hidden behind the magic wall of the castle guarded by the spell of “the love that dare not...
    4,031 Words | 10 Pages
  • The Influence of Oscar Wilde's Sexuality | English Literature
    The Influence of Oscar Wilde's Sexuality | English Literature Oscar Wilde (1854-1900) was a writer whose homoerotic texts pushed the social boundaries of the Victorian era. Born to a family of unabashed Irish agnostics, the self-proclaimed "dandy" valued art, fashion, and all things physically beautiful. After receiving a comprehensive education from Oxford, Wilde made a name for himself in London first as a novelist, penning the now famous The Picture of Dorian Gray. A string of successful...
    23,358 Words | 56 Pages
  • Protestant Gothic: Understanding Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray
    How does the term 'Protestant Gothic' help us to understand Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray? Even though his last years were horrible for him, being sent to prison and criticized by lots of people because of one of his own novels, one can’t deny that Oscar Wilde lived a really interesting life. His wittiness -shown in his numerous epigrams, like «The only thing worse than being talked about is not being talked about»-, sense of humor, vividness and way of thinking made him one of the...
    2,014 Words | 5 Pages
  • Themes, Motifs and Symbols in Oscar Wilde’s the Picture of Dorian Gray
    Themes, motifs and symbols in Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray The only published novel by Oscar Wilde, which appeared in Lippincott’s Monthly Magazine in 1890, was seen as immoral and scandalous, so the editors of the magazine censored about five hundred words without Wilde’s knowledge. Even with that, the novel was not received very well. Disappointed with this, Wilde revised his novel, added a preface, where he explains his philosophy of art, and six new chapters. Since Wilde...
    1,423 Words | 4 Pages
  • Oscar Wilde's "Picture of Dorian Gray" and the hedonistic effect on the characters.
    "Hedonism" By Jessica Shelby Oscar Wilde'sThe Picture of Dorian Gray is a prime example of hedonism, a movement in the late 1800's that claims pleasure to be the prime goal in one's life. The focus of the novel is the beauty of Dorian Gray, his self-destructive search for pleasure, and the corruption of both the lives he has encountered and his own soul. Beauty and pleasure are the focus of all characters and scenes depicted in The Picture of Dorian Gray. Wilde's timeless novel vividly...
    741 Words | 3 Pages
  • Oscar WIlde's The Picture of Dorian Gray presentation of women in the opening chapters
    "Wilde's presentation of women and marriage in the novel is wholly critical" How far and in what ways do you agree with this view? In the novel, The Picture of Dorian Gray, Oscar Wilde presents the image of women and the idea of marriage in many different ways, sometimes heavily negative, through dysfunctional relationships as well as saintly imagery. This presentation can be said to be influenced by several aspects such as contextually, Wilde himself lived in a patriarchal society, whose...
    1,360 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Reproduction of Categories of Content in the Georgian Translations of 'the Happay Prince' by Oscar Wild
    The Reproduction of categories of content in the Georgian Translations of 'The Happay Prince' by Oscar Wild By Tamar Osidze MA Student of Ivane Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University Publishing collections of fairy tales turned out to be a crucial point along Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde’s great creative path and it marks the beginning of the second important period of his life as a writer. The reality of Victorian London and Dublin is depicted in “The Happy Prince”. The...
    303 Words | 1 Page
  • A Personification of Darkness: A Comparison of Joseph Conrad's, "Heart of Darkness" and Oscar Wilde's "The Picture of Dorian Gray"
    Often an author uses a character to represent the ideals of a society through their work of literature. However, in both Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness and Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray, the authors also use their characters to represent the corruption within the ideals of both colonialism and Victorian hedonism. In Heart of Darkness, Kurtz is the ideal colonialist; he gives the impression of maintaining honorable intensions while also being "of value" to the Belgian trading...
    1,450 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Balance of Dorian Gray’s Structure of Personality in Oscar Wilde’s Novel the Picture of Dorian Gray: a Study of Psychoanalysis
    THE BALANCE OF DORIAN GRAY’S STRUCTURE OF PERSONALITY IN OSCAR WILDE’S NOVEL THE PICTURE OF DORIAN GRAY: A STUDY OF PSYCHOANALYSIS Background of the study Human lives with their desire though some of their desire are failed to deliver because of the norms border. As a human, we live in a community and it is impossible to do as we please. Norms play the role as law where it limits our behavior and make the standard law points about what we can do or what we cannot do. This law usually opposes...
    3,463 Words | 10 Pages
  • 'A selfish and sef-absorbed young man with whom the reader cannot sympathise or identity' discuss the ways in which Wilde portrays dorian gray
    ‘A selfish and self-absorbed young man with whom the reader cannot sympathise or identify’ In the light of this comment, discuss the ways in which Wilde portrays Dorian Gray Undoubtedly, Dorian is portrayed in the novel as supremely self-centred. However, because of the techniques Wilde uses to narrate the story, the reader is at times encouraged to enter into his inner world and increasingly to feel some sympathy for him. Even before we meet him, Dorian is presented as vain and thoughtless....
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  • Dorian Grey - 1111 Words
    Matt Essay: When Basil confronts Dorian about the fact he has allegedly corrupted many people Dorian defends himself by saying “Each of us has Heaven and Hell in him.” Is Dorian responsible for the ruined lives of his friends (Sybil, Basil)? Is Lord Henry responsible for the ruined life of Dorian? In the “Picture of Dorian Grey” by Oscar Wilde I believe that the main character Dorian Grey is responsible for the ruined lives of his friends, because of the way he treats them throughout...
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  • Dorian Gray - 344 Words
    On the excerpt analyzed, Basil Hallward paid Dorian visit to see why he had changed so much. Dorian leads Basil upstairs to where the portrait lies. Before murdered, upon seeing the portrait, Basil made a direct reference from the bible by saying “your sins be as scarlet, yet I will make them as white as snow” also a simile, meaning that he could reverse the damage done on the portrait. After Basil analyzed the portrait and criticized it, Dorian had this epiphany and was overcome with a strong...
    344 Words | 1 Page
  • Dorian Gray Paper - 2228 Words
     IAH 207 Sec 52 Paper 2 Final Oscar Wilde's “The Picture of Dorian Gray” was immediately a source of much controversy when it was first published in 1890. Some critics called it an immoral book, and gave it horrid reviews whereas others cited it as a wonderful book that takes a hard look at Aestheticism and Morality. The book does chronicle a young mans moral downfall, but there is a deeper message. Wilde gives us a story in which he clearly illustrates the incompatibility of...
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  • Picture of Dorian Gray - 1367 Words
    Balancing Duality Although Freud’s psychodynamic theory was not published until over 30 years after Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray, there are apparent parallels the reader can draw while reading the novel with this in mind. The theory, consisting of three parts, touches on the impulsivity of human nature and how our reckless desires are compromised with our higher moral code. In The Picture of Dorian Gray we see the main character unravel as a result of immoral and unnatural acts. The...
    1,367 Words | 4 Pages
  • Dorian Gray Character Analysis Focusong on the Theme of Homosexuality
    ‘Basil Hallward is what I think I am: Lord Henry what the world thinks me: Dorian what I would like to be—in other ages, perhaps.’ – Oscar Wilde in a letter[1] It is a recognized fallacy to equate the experiences of an author with those of a fictional character, even if said character happens to be the protagonist of the author’s most influential work. Nevertheless, there are some cases when this line of thought may be justified: not in the way of...
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  • Dorian Gray Essay - 687 Words
    The Picture Of Dorian Gray Essay There are certain aspects of Dorian Gray’s personality that make me think he is schizophrenic, such an example is multiple personalities. In the beginning of the story, Dorian was a young, attractive boy with cunning wit and a semi-feminine charm. It was just an ordinary day and all of the sudden, Dorian meets Basil Howard. Infatuated with his good looks, the beauty of Dorian hit Basil like a Mata bus. As Basil began painting a picture of Dorian, he met...
    687 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Relationship between Art and LIfe as presented in 'The Picture of Dorian Grey' and 'The Decay of Lying'
    Oscar Wilde was a passionate admirer of art, an intellectual dandy and a keen advocate of the Aesthetic Movement. Through his essay The Decay of Lying: An Observation, Wilde uses an obviously self-modelled character named Vivian to set out a series of doctrines which detail his personal philosophy on the relationship that exists between art and life, and the rolls that they should play. Chiefly these are: art should only express itself, expressing life and nature makes for bad art, life...
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  • The Picture pf Dorian Grey - Textual analysis
    ENL 102 Victorian Literature: Textual Analysis Part 2 Chosen extract: The Picture of Dorian Grey, Chapter 2 from “Suddenly the painter appeared at the door of the studio” to “I would give my soul for that!” Chapter two of “The Picture of Dorian Grey” is an important chapter as it firmly introduces readers to the title character, Dorian Grey and his cohorts. We learn that he exudes physical attractiveness, being ‘wonderfully handsome1’ with a ‘bright look in the eyes2’, and ‘finely-curved...
    927 Words | 3 Pages
  • Problem Solution Essays - 2185 Words
    Identity Crisis Identity Crisis 1 Identity Crisis Have you ever noticed that there is a common and constant theme to each author’s style of writing? For instance, Shakespeare’s fascination with heroines, and Sylvia Plath’s belief that death was beautiful. Oscar Wilde’s main interest involves double lives. The concept of double lives is shown in real life based on the fact that we never show people who we really are. Wilde himself lived a double life which leads to a series of unfortunate...
    2,185 Words | 6 Pages
  • Art for Art's Sake - 998 Words
    Ivette M. López The Value of Art: A study of John Ruskin and Oscar Wilde’s Views on Art In the late nineteenth century a movement known as “Art for Art’s Sake” occurred, which consists of the appreciation of art for what it truly is; just art. At that time many critics tried to find moral and intellectual meanings within works of art. Many artists united to defend art, two authors who defend the concept of art are John Ruskin and Oscar Wilde. In his work From The...
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  • The Picture of Dorian Gray - Analysis
    The picture of Dorian Gray This famous portrait is the only novel written by the author Oscar Wilde, who otherwise wrote poetry, plays and short stories. It first published in 1890, but since Wilde’s work became much criticized for its homoerotic parts and its lack of moral message, he had to moderate the language of several passes before publishing a new version the following year. This revised publication is considered as the authoritative edition. The setting and the plot The picture of...
    609 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Happy Prince - 935 Words
    “The Happy Prince and Other Tales” -Oscar Wilde Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde (16 October 1854 – 30 November 1900) was an Irish playwright, poet and author of numerous short stories and one novel. Known for his biting wit, he became one of the most successful playwrights of the late Victorian era in London, and one of the greatest "celebrities" of his day. Several of his plays continue to be widely performed, especially The Importance of Being Earnest. His most famous works are:...
    935 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Picture of Dorian Gray: Use of Mirrors
    In the controversial novel, "The Picture of Dorian Gray," the only published novel written by Oscar Wilde, the protagonist Dorian Gray begins to indulge the idea of hedonism from fellow friend Lord Henry. Dorian adores his beauty so much that he wishes the painting Basil Hallward is painting of him to grow old in his place. As a matter a fact, the portrait does age with every sin Dorian commits, and Dorian's outward appearance remains unchanged. The portrait is a reflection of dirty deeds done...
    635 Words | 2 Pages
  • "The Picture of Dorian Gray" Book Report
    Oscar Fingal O’Flarentie Wills Wilde was an Irish playwright, poet and author of numerous short stories and one novel. He was born in Dublin on 16 October 1854. Known for his biting wit, he became one of the most successful playwrights of the late Victorian era in London, and one of the greatest “celebrities” of his day. The Picture of Dorian Gray is a first and only novel written by Oscar Wilde. It was published in 1891. The book is focusing on the actions of a very egocentrical character...
    798 Words | 2 Pages
  • Dorian Gray Essay - 2329 Words
    Evil Prevails Over All Throughout life, there are developing stages that people experience, allowing for a balance of maturity and knowledge to be passed down from each generation. The harsh realization of reality and truth force people to leave their innocence behind and develop moral responsibility. As innocence becomes a rare quality, emerging as a more attractive force, it ignites an obsession. However, innocence can be tampered with by dark forces. People are easily influenced by others’...
    2,329 Words | 6 Pages
  • an ideal husband Themes - 2109 Words
    An Ideal Husband Themes by Oscar Wilde Major Themes Political Corruption Political corruption dominates the plot in An Ideal Husband. Sir Robert's flawless career is threatened by the corruption of his youth. One of the play's ironies is that the happy ending relies on Sir Robert's corruption remaining hidden from public view. The offer of a cabinet seat would never stand if the public had knowledge of his past. Yet, because he successfully hides this past, he feels absolved of his crime....
    2,109 Words | 6 Pages
  • Dorian Gray Ambiguous Characters
    AP Lit Essay Prompt option #1 In Oscar Wilde’s novel, “The Picture of Dorian Gray” one of the main characters Lord Henry Wotton is portrayed, as morally ambiguous. Wilde reveals Lord Henry’s ambiguous character through the way he talks, he has a more charming tone to him, but he leads a conversation in such a seducing way Dorian falls under his spell so fast. Lord Henry’s ambiguity is significant to the work as a whole because without Henry would Dorian of taken the same path that he took?...
    628 Words | 2 Pages
  • An Ideal Husband - A Social Study
    ​Many plays, whether dramatic or comedic, have ties into the social issues and setting of the time they were written. Writers such as Anton Chekhov, Tennessee Williams, and even Mark Twain have used the society of their time to produce satirical and even tragic works of literature. One of the best examples of a play that gathers meaning from societal values is Oscar Wilde’s An Ideal Husband. ​In 1893 Oscar Wilde began writing his fourth of five works (Tornaritis, Nicholas. Shelby, C. ed. "An...
    792 Words | 2 Pages
  • Dorian gray - 437 Words
    Within the story, The Picture of Dorian Gray, Oscar Wilde weaves his contradictions and inner struggles within his characters, noting self-opposition and redefining his own individual aesthetic devotion. Wilde was known to be an influencing presence in the aesthetic movement during the Victorian period, and throughout the novel he depicts the truth of his beliefs in portions beneath his characters. Dorian Gray becomes an outlet for Wilde's own vicarious pursuit of aestheticism, and is seen as...
    437 Words | 2 Pages
  • Corruptness of Victorian Society - 704 Words
    The goal of most playwrights is to relay a message of concern or interest to the audience in order to inform or educate them on issues faced in society, giving them a position to form their own opinion on the issues portrayed. In Oscar Wilde’s, The Importance of Being Earnest, many of the Victorian society’s views on life were described and illustrated for the audience’s comprehension. Through the duration of the play, the true corruptness of the upper class was portrayed through a series of...
    704 Words | 2 Pages
  • Dorian Gray - 807 Words
    The controversy surrounding "The Picture of Dorian Gray" when it was released is something that must be taken in context with regard to the moral climate of the Victorian time period. Critics of the time argued the book would corrupt those who read it based on what popular opinion considered abhorrent behavior at the time. Oscar Wilde on the other hand felt the book's overall message was more in tune with popular opinion than his critics, though suggested it wasn't radical enough. The argument...
    807 Words | 2 Pages
  • the beauty of the beast in picture of Dorian Grey2
    CONTENTS Introduction………………………………………………………………………...3 Part 1. Oscar Wild – the novelist of the England…………………………………..5 1.1. Literary works of O. Wild……………………………………...……………...6 1.2. The novel ‘The Picture of Dorian Gray’ and its significance…………………9 1. 3. Aestheticism in the novel …………………………………………………...10 Part 2. Lexical and syntactical stylistic devices used in the novel “The Picture of Dorian Gray” by O. Wild…………………………………………………………14 2.1. Phonetic stylistic devices……………………………………………………..14 2.2....
    7,284 Words | 20 Pages
  • Homoeroticism in the Picture of Dorian Gray
    Kailie Kipfmiller Charley ENG 210 Essay 2 16 November 2012 "I believe that if one man were to live out his life fully and completely, were to give form to every feeling, expression to every thought, reality to every dream -- I believe that the world would gain such a fresh impulse of joy that we would forget all the malady of medievalism, and return to the Hellenic ideal -- to something finer, richer than the Hellenic ideal, it may be. But the bravest man amongst us is afraid of himself”...
    1,780 Words | 5 Pages
  • The Picture of Dorian Gray - Essay
    Fjölbrautaskólinn í Garðabæ Guðni Eiríksson Fall 2011 October 2nd English 603 The Picture of Dorian Gray Jóhanna Ásta Þórarinsdóttir Table of contents: Introduction 3 Basil Hallward. 3 Dorian Gray 4 Lord Henry. 4 Conclusion 5 References: 6 Introduction The main characters of the book are Dorian Gray, Basil Hallward and Lord Henry which is sometimes also called Harry. These characters will be discussed throughout the essay....
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  • Each Man Kills the Thing He Loves
    “It seems to me that we all look at Nature too much, and live with her too little” This quote provides a philosophical insight into the main theme I will explore within my chosen poems. Nature is defined as the phenomena of the physical world collectively, including plants, animals, the landscape, and other features and products of the earth, as opposed to humans or human creations. However this simply states that nature and humans are opposites, and one opposes the other. The poems I have...
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  • The Picture of Dorian Gray: A Review
    Name:Mouri Moumita ID:0920605015 1. “There is no such thing as a moral or an immoral book,” Wilde says in the Preface. “Books are well written, or badly written. That is all.” Does the novel confirm this argument? Wilde published his only novel, The Picture of Dorian Gray, before he reached the height of his fame. It was criticized as scandalous and immoral. Disappointed with its reception, Wilde revised the novel in 1891, adding a preface and six new chapters. The Preface anticipates some...
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  • Mortality in The Picture of Dorian Gray
    Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray: Mortality Not Art Art for art’s sake. The saying originated from the French phrase l’art pour l’art from the nineteenth century French philosopher Victor Cousin. Art in this sense was not meant to be concerned with social, political, and moral subjects. Instead it was to concentrate on beauty, which would re-word the phrase to "art for the sake of beauty and its elevating effects." No matter the wording, art for art’s sake became central to the...
    3,786 Words | 9 Pages
  • Power of Youth and Beauty - 1812 Words
    Darsielle Hayes 2/2/06 Eng 202B Power of Youth and Beauty Some say that beauty is in the eyes of the beholder. Others say that it(beauty) is only skin deep. A person that is considered to have overwhelming beauty can commit a heinous crime and be forgiven because they have such beauty. In a society that puts beauty on a pedestal, youth and physical attractiveness become valuable possessions. Oscar Wilde's novel The Picture of Dorian Gray, prove all of these...
    1,812 Words | 5 Pages
  • The Picture of Dorian Gray: Character Analysis
    Amanda Boyd The Picture of Dorian Gray A key mistake established by the main characters in The Picture of Dorian Gray, is that their focus is always set on one another’s outer beauty rather than their moral backbone. In Oscar Wilde’s time era the society that he lived in was significantly influenced by the way people looked and dressed rather than the quality of their character. Lord Henry is the perfect example for someone who is only concerned with one’s outward appearance and...
    851 Words | 2 Pages
  • Importance Of Being Earnest - 2282 Words
    Lauren Skarupsky English III Honors Summer Work The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde Reading Questions 1. Explain how Wilde uses satire to critique Victorian society. Throughout the entire play Oscar Wilde critiques the Victorian society through each of the characters. The characters represent the Victorian era but have twisted views on the major emotions love and marry that are mentioned in the play continuously. Wilde depicts the ...
    2,282 Words | 2 Pages
  • Dorian Gray Theme - 680 Words
    Josh Nitz April 16, 2012 Professor Anders Response #7 Dorian Gray Oscar Wilde’s fictional piece The Picture of Dorian Gray is a wonderful story that provides insight on the effect that sin has on the soul. In the beginning of the story Dorian is a kind hearted man, but by the end he becomes a cold blooded murderer who thinks only about himself. The ending is also very interesting in the sense that although Oscar Wilde escaped suspicion, revenge from James and those who could put his...
    680 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Picture of Dorian Gray Represents Human Experience
    The Picture of Dorian Gray, a gothic horror novel by Oscar Wilde, represents human experience through themes such as corruption, love, and transformation. The majority of these themes are presented through the titular character, Dorian Gray, a young man who inadvertently sells his soul in exchange for eternal youth and beauty. Many of the themes in The Picture of Dorian Gray are still prevalent in society today, though they may be influencing people in a different way, and through different...
    1,397 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Picture of Dorian Grey Essay
    “The Picture of Dorian Grey” is one of the most interesting masterpieces of Oscar Wilde and has the greatest value as the only published novel, written by this author. If the reader is familiar with this book, than he, perhaps, would also know that the book has gone through a series of revisions by the author himself. Oscar Wilde added an entire chapter to his story that provided the reader with the insight into the feelings and emotions of the main character. What is this book about? One...
    317 Words | 1 Page
  • To what extent is Dorian Gray a satirical novel?
    The Picture of Dorian Gray was written by Oscar Wilde in 1891, who himself was a key proponent of the aesthetic movement created by Walter Pater. Within the novel Wilde shows blatant contradictions and struggles within his characters, particularly those of the upper echelons of British society. Wilde parodies with great success main characters such as Lord and Henry and later on Dorian, yet also lesser characters, such as Lord Fermor. . As a potential ‘reincarnation’ of Narcissus, Dorian...
    712 Words | 2 Pages
  • MWDS The Picture of Dorian Gray
    MWDS : The Picture of Dorian Gray ! AP English IV Title of Work: The Picture of Dorian Gray Author: Oscar Wilde Date of Publication: 1890 Genre: Gothic Biographical Information Oscar Wilde was born on October 16, 1854 to Sir William Wilde and Jane Wilde, the second of three children. Wilde studied at Oxford, and joined the Freemasons in 1878 after failing to join the Oxford Union. After graduation, he went home to Dublin and began writing poems. The Picture of Dorian Gray...
    1,411 Words | 11 Pages
  • Dorian Gray - 418 Words
    In The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde, Dorian, the main character undergoes important changes throughout the novel. In the beginning of the novel, Dorian is immature and naïve. Dorian is very kind and lacks the knowledge of life. However, Dorian meets Lord Henry and becomes corrupted with Lord Henry’s ideas of life. Due to Lord Henry’s influence over Dorian, this leads to the picture changing and Dorian’s realization that he was morally wrong in demeaning Sibyl Vane. Due to the altering...
    418 Words | 2 Pages
  • Dorian Gray - 607 Words
    Dorian Gray Presentation Arts purpose and Wilde’s philosophy on Art. As we know from works such as the Water Babies, Victorian society deemed it necessary for art to be useful, partly to entertain but mainly to morally educate. Wilde clearly states that ‘All art is quite useless’. This was one of his many conflictions with Victorian society. An artist should not make art for any purpose and yet this very book is used in education today undermining his work. Wilde remarks: To reveal...
    607 Words | 2 Pages
  • Dorian Gray - 2903 Words
    The Picture of Dorian Gray Describe the personality of a particular character. Include example. Basil Hallward is an artist and a friend of Lord Henry. On his search for pure beauty to put into his paintings he met Dorian Gray. He befriends him, and starts to paint him in all sorts of environments. After a while he decides to paint Dorian as he is. Basil becomes obsessed with Dorian Gray after meeting him at the party. He claims that Dorian possesses a beauty so rare that it has helped him...
    2,903 Words | 7 Pages
  • The Evolution of Criticism in the 19th Century
    Matthew Arnold, John Ruskin, Walter Pater, and Oscar Wilde were 19th century writers who all had one belief in common: that the criticism of works of art is at least as important as the works of art themselves. In 1865, Matthew Arnold stated that the function of criticism is “to see the object as in itself it really is.” In 1891, Oscar Wilde expressed that his view of the role of criticism was “to see the object as in itself it really is not.” This essay seeks to determine how and why one...
    3,103 Words | 8 Pages
  • The Picture of Dorian Grey - 1241 Words
    Every person contains a little ambiguity in their life. Dorian Gray from The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde however lives a life full of ambiguity; which other characters in the novel do not realize. It all starts when he notices a change of appearance in his portrait, and from there on out he only becomes worse. As he ages and sins his portrait begins to appear older and evil while Dorian himself keeps the same youthful and innocent face as before. While the portrait reflects Dorian’s...
    1,241 Words | 3 Pages
  • miss - 1211 Words
    Explain the ways Oscar Wilde and Henrik Ibsen present the idea of appearance and reality in ‘The Picture of Dorian Gray’ and ‘A Doll’s house’ A recurring theme throughout the novel ‘The Picture of Dorian Gray’ and the play ‘A Doll’s House’ is one that explores reality vs appearance. The writers explore this theme through their protagonists, and show an underlying message that everything is not how it seems. As both texts progress the reader begins to see the corruption that occurred in the...
    1,211 Words | 3 Pages

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