One-child policy Essays & Research Papers

Best One-child policy Essays

  • China's One Child Policy
    In 1978 Chinese statisticians and demographers alerted the Chinese government leaders that due to the large flux in the population of Chinese young adults there would be a continual increase in the Chinese population of over 1% annually for foreseeable decades. This heavily populated future was not a sustainable or productive outcome to China’s goal of the modernization of the population. The future based on this population would inevitably slow down the modernization of China due to the demand...
    2,278 Words | 6 Pages
  • China's One Child Policy
    China’s One Child Policy For better, or For Worse When China’s population started to outgrow the country's capacity to support it in the 1980s, the Chinese government introduced a policy of allowing only one child per family. China's one-child policy is controversial: while many people understand why it was introduced, others think it is inhumane. The policy is highly misunderstood, especially in the West. In their law to only allow one child per family, the leaders intended to stop the...
    3,098 Words | 8 Pages
  • Chinas One Child Policy
    The China’s “one-child” policy was introduced as a government policy in the country in 1979 .This work aims to briefly provide an overview of the policy and the reasons for its introduction, followed by a full paged assignment of the policy and its evolution within the last ten years. This latter assignment focuses on how it has increased, whether the policy is still necessary within China and possible alternative as searched by the surrounding literature. Vander put ten indicates...
    443 Words | 2 Pages
  • China's One-Child Policy
    Officials say that China’s family planning policy has prevented approximately 400 million births since being initiated in 1979.[1] Being that the main goal of China’s one-child policy was to reduce the number of children being born each year, it would seem that indeed the policy has been effective. However, some would challenge that the policy, in both principle and practice, has violated basic human rights.[2] To obtain a clear understanding of this debate, a few different angles need to be...
    3,728 Words | 10 Pages
  • All One-child policy Essays

  • One-Child Policy - 1587 Words
    Xu Huang Lauren Zajac English 100 Persuasive Essay Instructor Draft 15 Nov. 2012 It is the Time to Stop the One-Child Policy in China In 1979, the Population and Family Planning Commissions of China established a policy, which is the unique policy of China in the world, called the One-Child policy. According to the BBC News in the report of “China Steps Up ‘One Child‘ Policy,” The 'one child' policy stipulates each couple living in the cities should only have one child, unless one or both...
    1,587 Words | 4 Pages
  • One-Child Policy in China
    Introduced by the Chinese leadership in 1979 and considered to be one of the most invasive governmental social experiments of our era, the one-child policy in China, on the surface level, appears to have succeeded in its goal of stymieing the growth of the population to a manageable rate. The policy, however, regardless of whether or not it should be credited with the modern-day decreasing fertility rates in China, also brought about unintended social consequences. Despite the fact that this...
    2,156 Words | 6 Pages
  • China's One Child Policy
    THE WORLD’S MOST SEVERE FAMILY PROGRAMME or THE HIGH PRICE OF A LOWER POPULATION When we think about China the things that click in our heads are most probably the great blend of history, culture, and modernity, as well as the gleaming sky scrapers, thousands of factories and their recent economic boom. Along with that, a really memorable thing is that today, China's population is 1,343,239,923 (according to CIA World Factbook), making it the largest of any country in the world. The size...
    2,486 Words | 7 Pages
  • One-Child Policy in China
    Everyone knows the advantages of the one child policy in China. However, there are many people who think that there are more disadvantage than advantage and it make them feel discouraged. People in China created the one-child policy to stop the increase of population. To my mind, I believe that one-child policy is helping the future of China economically because it eradicates the poverty, saves a lot of resources and improves the education. People in china know that the one child policy...
    373 Words | 1 Page
  • One Child Policy in China
    China is a land that contains an overpopulation crisis. With a current estimated 1.4billion people living in China, something needed to be done in order to lower the birth rates and control the fast growing population. The solution the Chinese government came up with was the one child policy. They set up a number penalties and benefits in order to encourage the Chinese people to cooperate with this policy. The predicted outcome was to reduce the birth rates and reduce their population, which...
    2,475 Words | 7 Pages
  • China's One Child Policy
    Is China’s one child policy a good idea? Yes I believe it is. If China didn’t have the one child policy the average person would have less water and land (Doc C). A student that is only the only child will have a higher chance of getting better grades (Doc F). And you also wouldn’t have to spend a lot of money if you have a small family. When this policy didn’t exist a whole bunch of people would have babies, and there were too many people living in a place. China has so many people. They...
    331 Words | 1 Page
  • China's One Child Policy
    China’s One Child Policy For centuries China has stood as a leading civilization, outpacing the rest of the world in the arts and sciences. On the other hand, over the last decade it has gone downhill economically. A big factor for this massive downfall is the population of the country. China is overpopulated. At the dawn of this century there were about 426 million people living in China. Today the population is about 1.2 billion. About two-thirds of this 900 million-person increase was...
    1,717 Words | 5 Pages
  • One Child Policy in China
    Essay #4 China China, a massive country located in Eastern Asia, is the most populated country in the world, making up about one sixth of the worlds population. China is home to roughly 1,348,585,838 people (CIA). Because China is so over-populated the government has attempted to control the population by enforcing a one-child policy on families. This policy was established by former Chinese leader, Deng Xiaoping, to limit China’s rapid population growth. The one child policy is an attack...
    630 Words | 2 Pages
  • One CHild policy Essay
    What is the impact of One Child Policy on China’s society? The implementation of One-Child Policy first started in 1979 where each couple is entitled to give birth to only one child causing birth rate to decrease and since the 1990, the percentage of one child births exceeds 90 percent. (Feng, et al., 2014). This policy has avert 400 million births (Feng , et al., 2013). The Implementation of One-Child Policy had caused problems in the society where there is an imbalance sex ratio, changes in...
    1,112 Words | 4 Pages
  • One Child Policy - 3256 Words
    Topic: The Family Planning Policy and its Social Impact Since 1978 The Report Topic: The Family Planning Policy and its Social Impact Since 1978 Introduction: Since 1979,the Chinese govenment has implemented a new law—Family Planning Policy so as to control the birth rate in the country.For that,each family is only allowed to have one child except in some special cases. In the first part of this report,I will state the situation that China is now facing and also some...
    3,256 Words | 10 Pages
  • Chinas One Child Policy
    Chinas One-Child Policy Lilibeth Dejesus Geography period 7 Mrs. Barajas China’s One-Child Policy In China, there are more than 1.3 billion people living, working and building families. In 1978, the government created China’s one-child policy. China’s one-child policy was established by Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping in 1979 to limit China's population growth. The policy lets couples have only one child. If they have another child the mother is pressured to abort the pregnancy. The...
    748 Words | 2 Pages
  • China's One Child Policy
    China's one child policy In eastern Asia, boarding the East Asian China Sea a huge country named the Chinese Republic has now over than one billion people. China had a leading civilization for centuries guiding the whole world in different fields. However, in the 19th and the 20th century China suffered form serious problems, which resulted from huge numbers of population. When China was under the leadership of Mao who believed that a strong nation must have large population, the population of...
    7,082 Words | 22 Pages
  • One Child Policy DBQ
    One Child Policy In 1949, Mao Zedong governed China from nineteen forty nine to nineteen seventy six. Chinas population was poor at the time and the government was running out of ways to help chinas economy fix itself. China was in a dire need for a change. So Mao decided that he would encourage families to have more and more children. His logic was that the more people birthed would mean more workers to work on farms, ensuing a stronger China. He wanted China to thrive and surpass the richer...
    1,119 Words | 3 Pages
  • One Child Policy - 2257 Words
    Current China’s One-Child Policy sibo ma Current China’s One-Child Policy On October 31st, 2011, with a particular enfant born, the population of the world reached seven billion. Once again, population problems have aroused concerns in all circles of the society, which is also a big problem to China. As we all know, “With just over 1.3 billion people, China is the world’s most populous country. China represents a full 20% of the world’s...
    2,257 Words | 6 Pages
  • One Child Policy - 743 Words
    China is the world's most populous nation and its population has, on average, increased by over 25 people every minute, every day for the past 40 years. Until the 1960's china encouraged many births per family, because Mao believed that population growth made China more powerful. More people in china, meant more workers, which should let China catch up economically with wealthy countries. The population grew from around 540 million in 1949 to 940 million in 1976. Then beginning in 1970 the...
    743 Words | 2 Pages
  • China's One-Child Policy
    China's One-Child Policy In our society, the United States, children are seen potentially as the as the future. Whether they are male or female, they have the power to be something when they grow up. But if their life is cut short, the opportunity to do so is taken away. In 1976, China implemented what is known as the "One-Child Policy" in order to try and solve their problem of overpopulation (McDonald, 1996)....
    1,363 Words | 4 Pages
  • China: One Child Policy
    The world today consists of almost 6.9 billion people. China itself, serves host to more than 1.2 billion people. This astronomical figure is more than 17% of the enite word population. For centuries China has stood as a leading civilization, outpacing the rest of the world in the arts and sciences. On the other hand, over the last decade, it has also plummeted economically. A big factor for this massive downfall is its overpopulation within the country. Due to this exponential increase in...
    1,736 Words | 5 Pages
  • China’s One Child Policy
    Nieters and Mayer 1 Rachel Nieters and Megan Mayer Mrs. Manson World History Honors 10 March 2015 China’s One Child Policy From the late 1970s and on, China's population decreased by the thousands because of a policy limiting one child per family. After WWII, communism took control of China, which was currently a poor country. To increase economic growth, communist leader Mao Zedong encouraged couples to have many children. His goals for China were to catch up with the ...
    831 Words | 1 Page
  • One Child Policy DBQ
    One Child Policy By: Mikaela Basso p.6 The one child policy was established in China in 1979 because the population was growing extremely fast. The one child policy is a law that prevents families from having more than one child. It only applies to the Han Chinese ethnic group, which makes up 90% of the Chinese population. Sibling­less parents are allowed to have two children. Some Chinese people are in favor of the one child policy (OCP) because their lives were made easier. Other ...
    743 Words | 1 Page
  • Effects of One Child Policy
    Effects of the One-Child Policy China is the most populated country in the world with a total of 1.4 billion people, and the population is still growing. (WDI) Overpopulation is a current issue that many countries are dealing with and hope to gain control over. In China the previous leader Mao believed that a strong nation had a large population, but China has doubled its population since then. Now the country is being prevented from advancing due to the effects of a large population. The...
    1,064 Words | 3 Pages
  • China's One-Child Policy
    Chinas One-Child Policy In 1979 The Chinese government introduced a policy decreeing that each family could only have one child and any family that had more than one would be given an annual fine. In this essay I will answer weather the policy has done what it was made to do. The location of China is in the southeast part of Asia along the coastline of the Pacific Ocean. It has an area of 9.6 million square kilometres. Chinas population is currently 1.3 Billion. China is facing problems...
    454 Words | 2 Pages
  • One Child Policy - 3045 Words
    China’s One-Child Policy: Should It Be Abolished? After the People’s Republic of China had been founded in 1949, the improved sanitation and medicine promoted rapid population growth. Before long, the population boom started to take a major toll on the country’s food supply. Officials launched a campaign to promote birth control in 1955 in order to deal with the overpopulation. Their efforts were reversed though, in 1958 by the Great Leap Forward, which was Mao Zedong’s attempt to rapidly...
    3,045 Words | 8 Pages
  • China One Child Policy
    Geography Department 2013 -2014 Year 9 Student Task Sheet: Mid-Topic - Population Task: Over the past few weeks, you have been studying population density, population distribution and some ways we can control population. A very famous example of controlling a country’s population is ‘The One Child Policy’ that was enforced in China. You already know lots about this idea, the benefits, disadvantages, reasons for enforcing the policy etc. because we have already studied it in class. Your...
    476 Words | 3 Pages
  • China one child policy
    China One Child Policy State philosophy of the 1950s was that a large population gave a strong nation, so high birth rate was encouraged, as well as this during that time death rate fell due to better supply of food and medicine. In 1959, all attention was paid to improving industry leaving no attention on farming and as a result killing 20 million in a famine. After the famine, during the 1960s population was seen to be a problem with 55 million born every year. The result of this was the...
    587 Words | 2 Pages
  • One Child Policy - 2942 Words
    When one thinks of China it is common to conjure up images of rice fields and of the great wall, but also of crowded cities teeming with people and bicycles and cars. One rarely thinks of a nation populated mostly by men and boys, with a noticeable yet surreal absence of women. While this is a bit of an exaggeration, it has been noted over the past several decades that there is an alarmingly imbalanced sex-ratio. The policy has clearly contributed to the nation’s unnatural gender imbalance, as...
    2,942 Words | 8 Pages
  • THE ONE CHILD POLICY OF CHINA
    THE ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES OF CHINA'S ONE - CHILD POLICY STUDENT NAME: DUONG THI THANH MAI STUDENT NUMBER: 220113802 CLASS: CHINESE CULTURE SCHOOL: COLLEGE OF INTERNATIONAL STUDENT, SOUTHEAST UNIVERSITY OF CHINA EMAIL ADDRESS: DUONGMAI.VFU@GMAIL.COM ABSTRACT According to the National Population and Family Planning Commission of China, in 2010, China's population was more than 1.34 billion people, an increase of 5.84% in comparison with the year of 2000. However, the figure was lower...
    2,487 Words | 9 Pages
  • One Child Policy in China
    After c. 1949 when China built The People’s Republic of China, Chinese government leader Zedong Mao published a policy called “More people have more power”. Therefore, the population of China has increased fast until c. 1978. On the beginning of the year of c.1978, Chinese government finally found the serious problems from the huge population. Even though Chinese government stopped that policy, China already had 1.2 billion people. The government faced the burden of having a large population, so...
    1,905 Words | 5 Pages
  • One Child Policy in China
    One Child Policy in China What is One Child Policy? It is the birth control policy, one of the most important social policies over the world. Simply to say, One Child Policy is the population control policy that has applied since 1979 in China. The government sets a limit for the maximum number of children for each family. It officially restricts married urban couples to have only one child while it allows rural couples, minorities to have more than one child. It isn’t quite difficult...
    2,524 Words | 8 Pages
  • One Child policy in China
    Tourism Context and Culture ----- Essay Name: Yu Huang ID code: 111356 Class: 2ITMC-02 Date: 05/16/2013 Lecturer: Jeroen Hol Table of contents Introduction Today, China is comforted the largest country in the world. The population of China is 1,354,040,000, which is confirmed by Chinese government in January 2013. China as the...
    3,083 Words | 8 Pages
  • The One Child Policy - 1074 Words
    The one child policy is a famous policy that was implemented in the People’s Republic of China. A Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping established it in 1979 to limit China’s population growth. By the name itself, the policy states that only one child is allowed in a household. However, if the first child is a girl, the couple is given another chance to have one more child but you can’t bear a child right after the first one. A well-known slogan in China: ” Late, Long, and Few” The policy advocates...
    1,074 Words | 3 Pages
  • One Child Policy - 2518 Words
    One child Policy Implemented in China In 1979, a one-child policy was introduced to control China’s growing population and reduce the damage on scarce resources. Despite its success on curbing their population and lowering the demand on resources, it’s important that the one child policy comes to an end. It’s the 21st century and a restriction on family size is archaic, ruthless as well as demeaning to human rights. How will the country be successful as a whole with such harsh...
    2,518 Words | 6 Pages
  • Chinas One Child Policy
    Crystal Valencia Mr. Smock Language Arts 4, Period 2 11 March 2013 China’s One Child Policy Like Arthur Waley states "When a son is born, Let him sleep on the bed, Clothe him with fine clothes, And give him jade to play…When a daughter is born, Let her sleep on the ground, Wrap her in common wrappings, And give broken tiles to play…". Traditional Chinese Society value and worship boys rather than girls because they say boys are more beneficial since they are harder workers and they carry...
    1,625 Words | 5 Pages
  • China One Child Policy
     When did it start? China's one-child policy started in 1978 but did not take effect until 1979. It is created by Chinese leader Deng Xiao ping. This is to solve the over population in China. It has thus been in place for more than 36years. It is started because of the population is too high in China nowadays. How did it worked? It is put in a place as a population control strategy restricting married couples to having one child. When the birth rates have decrease in the year and the death...
    358 Words | 2 Pages
  • One Child Policy in China
    ONE-CHILD POLICY IN CHINA "For a prosperous, powerful nation and a happy family, please use birth planning." (Government sign in Nanchang, China) Introduction China’s population surge during the second half of the 20th century was largely man-made. It had put China’s policymakers a pressure to slow down the rapid increase in a huge population as it was a development burden for the country. Going into effect since 1981, the One-child policy refers to the one-child limitation on most...
    358 Words | 2 Pages
  • China's One Child Policy
    China's One Child Policy Overview Throughout the 20th Century, China's population has increased drastically from 582 million in 1953 to 1.25 billion people in 1999. In order to control the increasing population China has put the 'One Child Policy' in place. This policy only lets families have one child. The policy has prevented 400 million births that China could not maintain. But there are punishments for not following the policy and rewards for abiding by it....
    1,407 Words | 4 Pages
  • ONe child policy - 1576 Words
    University of Applied Sciences Business Administration One-child policy in China Term paper Submitted within the study programme Bachelor of Science in Business Administration For the module ACWE – Academic Writing in English Expert Valerie Faminoff Mangold Submission date 19.12.2012 Contents 1. Introduction In 1960 Chinese were allowed to have as many children as possible. It was even a good omen for the country1. In 1979 the...
    1,576 Words | 6 Pages
  • china one child policy
    One Child Policy: China Having only one kid can cause your child to have isolation problems and loneliness. Children like to have siblings so they can have someone to play with and make memories to talk about when they are older. Most people would probably think that forbidding people to only have a certain amount of kids would be taking their right of freedom away. This is what China’s one child policy did when it got put into action.This act was introduced to limit the population since the...
    1,215 Words | 3 Pages
  • One Child Policy Should It Be Relaxed?
    One child policy should it be relaxed? Good morning! Today I am going to talk about ‘ one child policy’ . One child policy has been launched in china since 1979. It aims to keep the population in china under control. Only one child is allowed to be given birth in every single Chinese family. After 30 years of strict implementation , great influence can be seen today. The policy keeps the rate of natural increase of population in china at a very low level of 1.3 , which is below the globe...
    817 Words | 2 Pages
  • China's One Child Family Policy
    China's one child family policy was introduced in 1979 by Deng Xaioping.T he basic aim was to reduce the amount of people residing in China by the year 2000.The government did this by putting up propergandas brain-washing people making them think that they aren't the only ones with one child. This is the truth however these citizens deserve their freedom and not all agree. The government is also write in its own way as if this carried on in the future there would be a lack of resources such as...
    350 Words | 1 Page
  • One Child Policy Term Paper
    One Child Policy in China Thesis: The One Child Policy in China is cruel and unfair to those it applies to. I Intro A. Today, China has the largest population in the world. B. The One Child Policy only applies to Han Chinese living in urban areas. C. Created to control population growth, using any means necessary. D. Thesis II Body paragraph 1 1. China has reduced the population by 200 million people a. Implemented by government to alleviate pop. growth, social,...
    2,531 Words | 8 Pages
  • Consequences of China's One Child Policy
    HIST HP 264-002 | Consequences of China’s One-Child Policy | | | In the mid 1950’s, China’s population grew rapidly under Mao Zedong. He felt that the only way for China to get back on its feet was to become industrialized and that China would need manpower for this industrialization. “Even if China's population multiplies many times, she is fully capable of finding a solution; the solution is production," Mao Zedong proclaimed in 1949. "Of all things in the world, people are the...
    3,356 Words | 9 Pages
  • China S One Child Policy
    China’s One Child Policy 1: The main reason that the one child policy was introduced was that the population of China was growing far too quickly. Data suggests that the one child policy has reduced China’s population by around 400 million, a huge amount. The one child policy was to save resources, land and natural resources. In 1976 the population of China was around 940 million, which had grown from 540 million in 1949- a 400 million gain in less than 30 years. This couldn’t go on and as the...
    849 Words | 3 Pages
  • China´S One Child Policy
    Victor Acosta Argumentative Essay China's One-Child Policy According to the U.S. Census Bureau the world’s population consists, of 6,908,497,829 people. China resides as the world’s leading populated country with 1,336,718,015 people. Because, of this over population it maintained fears of their food, resources, and living spaces. The Chinese government then implemented the one-child policy. The one-child policy has prevailed effectively in slowing down the population growth, but it...
    1,148 Words | 4 Pages
  • China S One Child Policy
     One of the things that people love and appreciate about the U.S.A is the fact that it’s a free country. There is about 322 million people that live in the U.S, each day marks thousands of new lives and deaths. Some people, like myself enjoy big and crowded families so they usually have more than 1 child. Now imagine having three kids and have two of them taken away from you because you’re not supposed to have more than 1. It sounds unfair and controlling but in China the “one child...
    411 Words | 1 Page
  • One-Child Policy Should Not Be Abolished
    One-child Policy Should Not be Abolished In the 1970`s, Chinese government implemented one-child policy for Chinese families to control the rapidly growing population (Zhang and Goza 2006). This policy, although passed into law for almost 40 years, has come under much heated debate on whether China should maintain it or abolish it altogether. Along with Chinese population structure changing, two social issues, population aging and imbalance of sex ratio arise and gradually become manifest....
    3,987 Words | 11 Pages
  • The Influences of One-Child Policy in China
    Thirty years after the mainland began forbidding some families from having more than one child, in order to solve a dizzying population crisis, the country’s psychiatrists say the result has been a self-centred generation that, having grown up without siblings has never learned to share. Now, as the children from one-child families enter child-bearing age themselves, mainland authorities have decided to intervene to prevent similar problems occurring. In Beijing and Guangzhou, health...
    772 Words | 2 Pages
  • China's One-Child Population Policy
    China’s one child policy was established by Deng Xiaoping in 1979 to slow the rise of communist China’s exponential population growth. China is the world's most populous country and its population will only continue to rise unless something is done about it. Some find it harsh and inhumane to limit the number of offspring, but China is doing this for its people. An unchecked population growth puts and enormous strain on resources and hampers economic development. China’s one child policy was...
    932 Words | 3 Pages
  • One Child at a time: The Effects of China's One-Child Policy
     Over time the human population has witnessed and endured the effects of many different policies and laws. Some of these laws have proven to be beneficial, while others have caused significant emotional and economical damage. China's One-Child Policy inducted in 1979, is one of those damaging policies which has dramatically altered China's economic well-being while emotionally scaring most if not all of China's families. Planning for a family, caring for the elderly and prejudice against...
    1,817 Words | 6 Pages
  • Case Study China s one child policy
    Phatcharapol Mongkolkamarat China’s One Child Policy The number of people in China was already high making the economy for the country very bad as they had to use their money to build schools and more health care as there was so many people. The number of people also meant that there was less jobs for people and with no money people started to starve and slowly die from poverty and famine. There was ...
    1,661 Words | 1 Page
  • China's One Child Policy Annotated Bibliography
    Although china's one child policy may have successfully decreased its growth rate, it resulted in a large aging population, "black population" and gender imbalance. "China's Abuse-a-Child Day; Kidnapping, Slaughter and Abandonment Is Communist Policy," The Washington Times (Washington, DC) 31 May 2011: B04, Questia, Web, 22 Apr. 2012. The article talks about how every year on June 1, China celebrates its beautiful children and how millions of children are abandoned every year. The article...
    1,025 Words | 4 Pages
  • One Child Policy of China: Socio-Economic Effects
    China is world’s most populous and fastest emerging economy that is seen as a continent in it instead of being part of Asia. In recent years, developed nations have been surprised by the acceleration of development in country that they give examples of success stories based on China’s market. Apart from China’s sophisticated with complex economic and political system, China also demonstrate interesting trends in several different prospects of society that are often neglected by intellectuals....
    1,733 Words | 5 Pages
  • One Child Policy Was It A Good Idea
    China’s One­Child Policy: Was it a good idea? Mao Zedong, the leader of China thought that the more people there are the more workers, which would make China stronger. He soon realized that he was wrong. In 1979, the population of China was 1 billion, and it’s still growing. This is what led to a government enforced policy known as the one­child policy in 1979. It’s been 35 years since this policy was enforced. There are both positives and negatives about this policy, ...
    485 Words | 1 Page
  • China's One Child Policy Newspaper Report
    On 13th May 2012, in China, 4 months old baby girl, Mai Chen, (her name was on a note tucked in her clothes) was found in a dumpster behind a cinema in Beijing, her parents have and been taken to court for abandonment. The couple have admitted to abandoning their daughter and they said “We wanted a boy to lead out family after us and we had to leave Mai do follow to follow this and the one child policy”. The one-child-policy has led to many cases like this where children have been neglected,...
    467 Words | 2 Pages
  • Chinas One Child Policy and the Economic Implications
    Chinas one child policy Introduction: Vast depletion of natural resources, limited amounts of space, malnourishment, these are all effects of an overpopulation of a country. In the 1970’s, China was faced with the same scenario, which called for an immediate policy that had to be implemented to further delay the unbearable impacts that have arose. China would not wait and lay victim to prove that Thomas Malthus’ population hypothesis could in fact prove true. Therefore the 1 child policy...
    1,044 Words | 3 Pages
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of China's one child policy.
    As China realised the need for modernisation, the one child policy was implemented in June 1979 to achieve three main goals: 1. To address the low per capita GNP by increasing the per capita income to $800. 2. To increase or improve the standard of living. 3. To keep China's total population size from exceeding 1.2 billion by the year 2000. China recognised the easiest way to achieve these goals was by restricting the population growth. That way, there would be a more likely increase in per...
    490 Words | 2 Pages
  • Letter for Chineses government about One child policy
    Dear Government of China Hello. I am Ailing who is living in Shanghai. I’m 11 years old now, and I love drawing. I know that you will be wondered ‘why this young girl is sending me the letter?’. The purpose of this letter for you, is to tell you my life story. Please read carefully. I was born in Shanghai 11 years ago. I was the first baby for my parents, so they loved me very much. One day, my mom became pregnant again. It was 3 years ago. I remember how much they felt happiness by that...
    727 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Economic and Social Impacts of China's One Child Policy
    In 1949, the Communists came to power in China. Between 1949 and 1984 only three population censuses were conducted. Very little information from the 1953 and 1964 censuses was released by the Chinese government. Western researchers and demographers pieced together information to help create a picture of China’s population. According to these researchers and demographers, China’s population in 1949 was approximately 541.7 million. By 1982, the population had nearly doubled to 1008.2 million....
    1,523 Words | 4 Pages
  • China S One Child Policy Revision Bookl
    China’s One Child Policy China’s One Child Policy was established in 1979 to limit China's population growth, by restricting families to have only one child per family. Fines, pressures to abort a pregnancy, and even forced sterilization accompanied second or subsequent pregnancies. There were also 24 years+ marriage laws. The policy reflects a neo-Malthusian philosophy of preventative measures being employed in order to prevent ‘positive’ checks of famine etc. Since the policy started: 336...
    335 Words | 2 Pages
  • Birth Control in China: the One Child Policy
    Population Control In China “ There are many ways to make the death rate increase” (Robert McNamara). The regulation of population via forced abortions, forced sterilizations, infanticide, and government programs does not only hurt the economy, but continuously damages it to a point of weakness and downfall. Population control in China has been hurting the Chinese people and destroying the Chinese economy for a span of 65 years, and continues to cause conflict even today. The one-child policy...
    994 Words | 3 Pages
  • Do You Agree with the One Child Policy?
     Do You Agree with China’s One Child Policy? China’s government had always had the problem of finding a way to provide for its large population. After the death of Mao in the 1970s, China finally realized that if the economy or the standard of living were ever going to improve, they would need to reduce China’s massive population. Thus, in the 1980s, the One Child Policy was introduced as a solution but did China make the right choice by limiting parents to only one child? After...
    1,074 Words | 3 Pages
  • Second child policy in China
    “second child policy china” China could fully implement second-child policy http://www.wantchinatimes.com/news-subclass-cnt.aspx?id=20131030000046&cid=1103 Shandong county's population drops despite 2nd child policies http://www.wantchinatimes.com/news-subclass-cnt.aspx?cid=1103&MainCatID=11&id=20131105000079 China relaxes one-child policy in face of ageing population and dwindling workforce http://metro.co.uk/2013/08/14/china-one-child-policy-3921116/ China Is Ending Its...
    420 Words | 2 Pages
  • Two Child Policy - 497 Words
    Two Child Policy : Agree Or Disagree? Before I start I will explain first “What is the Two Child Policy?”. Two-child policy is a government-imposed limit of two children allowed per family. It is used for some population groups in China, has previously been used in Vietnam, and has lately been discussed in the Philippines. Although not by law, in 1970s, citizens of Hong Kong were also highly encouraged to have two children as a limit, and it was used as part of the region's family...
    497 Words | 2 Pages
  • Evaluate the social and economic impacts of the ‘One Child’ Policy in China
    Evaluate the social and economic impacts of the ‘One Child’ Policy in China In the year 1979, China was suffering a severe increase in population, and because of this Deng Xiaoping (leader of the communist party of China) introduced China to an anti-natalist policy called the ‘One Child’ policy. An anti-natalist policy aims to decrease the crude birth rate and the total fertility rate in a country in order to slow the population growth . This policy generated many social and economical...
    1,180 Words | 4 Pages
  • One Child Policy for the Future China Whether It’s Still Favorable to Be Implemented
    One Child Policy for the Future China Whether It’s Still Favorable to be Implemented (Based on The Advantages and Disadvantages) By Chemilia Gemilang Bekti International Business Student of Southeast University, Nanjing, China 1. Overview The family planning was introduced around 1980 to rein in China’s surging population by encouraging late marriages and pregnancies, as well as limiting most urban couples to one child most rural places couple to two children. The one child policy...
    4,896 Words | 14 Pages
  • Should the Rest of the World Adopt Chinas One Child Policy?
    One Child Policy: Taking Control to a New Level China began its one child policy in 1979 by the Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping. The policy’s purpose was to monitor and limit the booming population’s growth. This policy began as a “temporary measure,” that once stabilization took place, the policy would ease up on its strictness and its tight grip on the people. And yet still today parts of China continue this policy. This policy allows only one child per couple. Law enforcers made sure that...
    1,435 Words | 4 Pages
  • To What Extent Can the One Child Policy Be Regarded as a Success?
    To what extent can the One Child Policy be regarded as a success? In 1979, China had an estimated 1.3 billion inhabitants. At this time, China contained approximately ¼ of the total population of the world. China’s growing economy and huge population created a huge strain on its carrying capacity and China had to come up with a solution to slow the birth rate down rapidly. In a drastic effort to put an end to the problems, the government started the One Child Policy. The policy meant that all...
    687 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Child - 2990 Words
    Task 3 AC 3.1 ➢ Attachment needs: By knowing the background of a child, having a good relationship with his/hers parents/carers and learning about the child’s interests all adds to aid the bonding. Each child is allocated a key worker but all staff should be able and available to engage with a child. Listening to them, builds the trust and confidence they will have with you and therefore are more likely to come to you with any problems or concerns e.g. a child in nursery has quite a...
    2,990 Words | 10 Pages
  • What is the place of children in contemporary Chinese society in the context of one-child policy, and what factors influence it ?
     What is the place of children in contemporary Chinese society in the context of one-child policy, and what factors influence it ? China since early times has been a society with family-centered values, and the old saying "Children are the future of the country" (Haizi shi zuguo de weilai) reflects the matter of children being of a big importance. In this essay, I will present some views and opinions of the mainland Chinese citizens I have encountered that are related to the...
    1,688 Words | 5 Pages
  • China’s One Child Policy is said to have created a generation of ‘Little Emperors’. Assess the consequences of most families having only one or two children.
    China’s One Child Policy is said to have created a generation of ‘Little Emperors’. Assess the consequences of most families having only one or two children. China's one-child family policy has had a great effect on the lives of nearly a quarter of the world's population for a quarter of a century, after it was introduced in 1979. One of the effects is often referred to as “Little Emperor’s Syndrome”, which is when the only child received excessive amounts of attention from relatives causing...
    1,203 Words | 3 Pages
  • China's Invisible Children & the One Child Law
    Sierra Furtado Neil Campbell ENG 1010 2.21.13 China’s Invisible Children & The One Child Law. “In order to stabilize the world’s population,” wrote Jacques Yves Cousteau “350,000 must be eliminated per day.” This powerfully haunting statement has been regulated and reinforced in China, by their government, since 1979. Although Chinese officials don’t eradicate nearly even a quarter as many lives daily, their One Child Law does put a reasonable dent into the lives that are brought into...
    1,098 Words | 3 Pages
  • Oone Child - 353 Words
    ne-child policy (simplified Chinese: 计划生育政策; traditional Chinese: 計劃生育政策; pinyin: jìhuà shēngyù zhèngcè, officially translated as "family planning policy"[1]) is the population control policy of the People's Republic of China (PRC). It restricts urban couples to only one child, while allowing additional children in several cases, including twins, rural couples, ethnic minorities, and couples who are both only children themselves.[2] In 2007, according to a spokesperson of the Committee on the...
    353 Words | 1 Page
  • Nat.Geo - Child Rearing - 922 Words
    National Geographic Taboo: Child Rearing 1. The location is in Beijing, China. 2. The subculture is based on a sport—Gymnastic sport culture at Shi Cha Hai School. 3. In this particular subculture, the people live rather interestingly. From age 3 ½, some special students are selected for special training to be in a prestigious sports school by the name of Shi Cha Hai School. Parents are often hesitant to let their children go due to China’s “one child policy”; however, some parents...
    922 Words | 3 Pages
  • Antinatalsit Policies Vs Pro Natalist
    Anti-natalist Policies Are More Effective than Pro-natalist Policies The population size of a country can have strenuous effect on the economy and environment, to alter the population growth of their country some governments put in place policies to help change their population. Some countries around the world have and are too large of a population, putting strain of their resources and environment, this bring the government to create pro-natalist policies, incentivising having small families....
    875 Words | 3 Pages
  • Adavantages and Disadavantages of Being the Only Child
    Advantages and Disadvantages of Being an Only Child Pros And Cons Of Being The Only Child Being an only child can be either good or bad, depending on how you perceive it and how you are brought up by your parents. The advantages could be that you get the undivided love and attention of your parents. They would dote on you more and provide for you more - in terms of getting you stuff, toys, etc. Obviously, being an only child means that your parents have only you to spend the money on and not...
    788 Words | 2 Pages
  • China's Population Policy Research Paper
    The One-Child Policy in China By: Jessie Corbett Period 6 / 7 November 2009 China’s population has topped the charts for decades, containing over a fifth of the world population,[1] outpacing the rest of the world in technology and arts. That is, until recent years when the “One-Child Policy” was issued in 1979 in order to alleviate social, economic, and environmental problems in China. The “One-Child Policy” has three main objectives: to bolster hindered marriage and hindered child...
    1,359 Words | 4 Pages
  • Case Study : Efficiency of Chinese Birth Control Policy
    A. Efficiency of birth-control policies : case study of China The Chinese birth control policy is known as an example of efficiency. Indeed, the country's fertility rate has felt from 7.55 in 1962 to 1.88 forty years later. How can we explain such a change in a population that was supposed to experience a demographic explosion in the seventies ? Several birth control policies have been applied to get such a significant result. Demography became a concern for soviet China after the first...
    1,119 Words | 3 Pages
  • Population Policy in Aisa - China vs. India
    Population Policy in Aisa - China Vs. India Executive Summary Both China and India are very important countries not only in Asia, but the world. As the largest and second largest population country in the world, their population policy has great effects on many areas of the world. Such as agriculture, economy, education. Through my project, we can find out that both China and India spend a lot of efforts in control their population and achieved some goals. China reduced population...
    2,653 Words | 9 Pages
  • Compare Policies Used in China to Control Rapid Population Growth
    Compare policies used in China to control rapid, population growth with the policies used in one other named country The two policies that I have studied are the One Child Policy in China and the Population Control Program in Kerala, India. In 1978, china decided that they needed to control the population and introduced a law that only one successful pregnancy was allowed per couple and rewards were given if couples followed the rules such as pay rise, free education for child and healthcare as...
    427 Words | 1 Page
  • States Should Interfere in Citizens’ Personal Lives by Implementing Mandatory Family Policies.
    Task One In Poland the ‘baby-wrap benefit ‘ is a one-off payment of PLN 1,000; in Denmark families with two or three children receive a considerable monthly family allowance; in China, on the other hand, a couple is allowed to have only one child. Each initiative is intended to reverse unfavourable demographic trends in a given country. Do you think states should interfere in citizens’ personal lives by implementing mandatory family policies? Argue for or against such initiatives in an essay....
    1,084 Words | 3 Pages
  • zxcz - 577 Words
    Scholarly articles for chinese one child policy social analysis … one-child policy and the care of children: An analysis … - ‎Short - Cited by 72 … , sex selective abortion, and one child policy: analysis … - ‎Zhu - Cited by 111 The effect of China's one-child family policy after 25 … - ‎Hesketh - Cited by 247 Search Results Population, Policy, and Politics: How Will History Judge China's One ......
    577 Words | 4 Pages
  • China - 847 Words
    China's one-child policy impact analyzed By Rebecca Morelle Science reporter, BBC World Service Researchers have analyzed the long-term effect of growing up alone People growing up under China's one-child policy are less trusting, more risk averse and more pessimistic, a study concludes. An Australian team of researchers compared people who were born just before the policy was introduced with those born after. They used economic games and surveys to assess the participants'...
    847 Words | 3 Pages
  • Minds Are Open Only When Hearts Are Open
    "By joining efforts we can surpass the injustices inflicted on the girl child and boy child alike. If left untreated, these forces will permanently scar our children and threaten the healthy growth of nations." - Queen Rania Al Abdullah of Jordan (presented for our book on Discrimination Against the Girl Child) Discrimination against the Girl Child While children around the world continue to face various forms of adversity in the 21 st century, girl children in particular are subjected...
    2,524 Words | 8 Pages
  • China's Population Problem - 1239 Words
    China's Population Problem The Chinese government has taken the enforcement of family planning and birthrate laws to an extreme by violating the civil rights of its citizens, which has had bad effects on the morale of its people (Whyte 161). China's population has grown to such an enormous size that it has become a problem to both the people and government. China, the most populous country in the world, has an estimated population of about one thousand-one hundred-thirty three point six...
    1,239 Words | 4 Pages
  • "Missing Girls"- Elizabeth Croll
    Through her study, Elizabeth Croll claims there are ‘missing girls’ in China and South Asia, because of the diminishing ratio of female to male infants in these countries. A common trend throughout these countries; which has contributed to the ‘missing girls’ in statistics, is the belief held that sons are preferred over daughters. This belief is encouraged by the cultures of these countries; boys were believed to be of more importance as they could keep the family name, preventing extinction of...
    1,165 Words | 4 Pages
  • China's Population Control Cast Study
    Case Study: China’s Population Control In 1979, China passed their One-Child policy in an effort to decrease their major overpopulation issue. This policy prevents most couples from having more than one child, although there are exceptions. Most ethnic minorities, such as the Hui, are allowed to have two children, & those that are an ethnic minority & live in rural areas are allowed three. Although these people can, by law, have more than one child, it is still encouraged that they choose to...
    2,834 Words | 7 Pages
  • China Population Control - 1515 Words
    * With just over 1.3 billion people (1,330,044,605 as of mid-2008), China is the world's most populous country. * As the world's population is approximately 6.7 billion, China represents a full 20% of the world's population so one in every five people on the planet is a resident of China. * China's population growth has been somewhat slowed by the one child policy, in effect since 1979. * China's one child policy was established by Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping in 1979 to limit...
    1,515 Words | 4 Pages
  • Family Planning in China - 2489 Words
    Britt Petty Mr. Wesney AP World 12 November 2014 Family Planning in China: Rough Draft/Peer Copy Family planning in China has been ultimately beneficial to help control the population in the overcrowded country. The population of China has declined since the policy first took effect in 1979, statistics show that the birth rate has gone down dramatically and may even be cut in half by the year 2050 (Anders). Some people see the policy as too harsh and that it infringes on the people’s...
    2,489 Words | 7 Pages
  • Female Infanticide - 2762 Words
    Imagine a world with no women. There as no wives, no sisters, no daughters, and no mothers. Unfortunately this world is on the brink of becoming a scary reality for Asian countries such as China and India. Due to attempts to control population and the low value associated with females in these societies historically and culturally, both China and India are now facing a serious gender imbalance. Female infanticide and sex-selective abortion are responsible for this gender imbalance. The two...
    2,762 Words | 7 Pages
  • female infanticide - 7286 Words
    THE CONCORD REVIEW 1 , SEX-SELECTIVE ABORTION, FEMALE INFANTICIDE, AND THEIR LASTING EFFECTS IN CHINA AND INDIA Ayana Gray Introduction W ith a consistency comparable only to the world’s ability to change daily, humanity undergoes evolution. Politically, economically, and particularly socially, changes throughout the contemporary world are unavoidable and, at best, only understood in part. Yet amidst many changes that threaten the global community’s future, demographic...
    7,286 Words | 32 Pages
  • Overpopulation in China and India - 1360 Words
    With the growth and development of all powerful countries comes an increase of population. India and China, both rapidly growing countries of power, serve as fine examples of this. Both of the countries inhabit over one billion people, something that no other countries in the world can say about themselves (Rosenburg China). While these two nations have improved industrially and economically, their populations have grown drastically as well. To stifle over-population, both countries responded by...
    1,360 Words | 4 Pages
  • Control of Population Growth by the Government
    Control of Population Growth by the Government Population growth is the increase in the number of people who live in a specific area. Population growth has a huge impact of economies, education, etc., therefore the levels of population growth is a huge concern around the world. There have been a number of countries that have been encouraging the population to produce more offspring, such as Shanghai. However, these policies are just to motivate the population to have more babies and there are...
    454 Words | 2 Pages
  • China Gender Bias - 1061 Words
    Jessica Raposo October 9, 2012 Human Roots and Societies China: A Gender Bias Country Son preference has existed among most Chinese parents for centuries. Across thousands of years of Chinese history, Confucianism has served as an officially supported patriarchal belief that has deemed women inferior to men and has limited the role of women to their households. Women were understood to belong to their families before marriage and thus were required to be obedient to their fathers or...
    1,061 Words | 3 Pages
  • Knowledge - 332 Words
    Zong Qinghou was born in 1945 in Hongzhou during a turbulent period in China (Yang, 2004). Zong did not receive much formal education, thus he had various menial low paying jobs from 1963 to 1982, including jobs at the Zhoushang Salt Farm, the Luxing Farm, and a small paper carton factory. Like millions of other Chinese workers without many opportunities to earn a decent living, Zong dreamed of starting his own business. The opportunity came in 1986 after Zong returned to Hongzhou to take care...
    332 Words | 1 Page
  • 200 Million Girls: Female Infanticide in China and India Takes Many Lives.
    Ga-Yi Cheung, 02CE 1057103 Theo Vijgen. Culture and Institutions Part 2 Words: 1062 11 June 2012 200 Million Girls: Female infanticide in China and India takes many lives. It is a girl. The four deadliest words in Asia. In the past 5 decades 200 million girls went ‘missing’ in India and China. In Asia the horrible phenomenon female infanticide occurs on a large scale. According to M.P., “Female infanticide is the intentional killing of baby girls due to the preference for male babies and...
    1,353 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Causes and Effects of Gender Imbalance in Asia
    The Causes and Effects of Gender Imbalance in Asia By Tom Farrer Throughout this paper I will focus on the phenomenon of the gender imbalance in Asia. I will begin by assessing the current situation and researching the various causes which have led to it. I shall then analyse the possible consequences to follow and conclude with an outlook to the future. According to the United Nations the recommended sex ratio at birth (SRB) for a country is 107, meaning that for every 100 females born,...
    1,830 Words | 6 Pages
  • China Lost Girls - 402 Words
    China’s Lost Girls China is largest population in the world because of that Chinese government decided a policy which is one-child policy. A family has only one child, but some case a family can have second child if they pay to government. One of big issue in China is balance of gender which means man’s population is much larger than female’s. Chinese people want to have a boy because a man carries the family name in Chinese culture; therefore, thousands of Chinese girls are aborted,...
    402 Words | 2 Pages

All One-child policy Essays