Nicholas II of Russia Essays & Research Papers

Best Nicholas II of Russia Essays

  • Nicholas Ii of Russia - 723 Words
    Anonymos 21/03/13 Nicholas II of Russia Nicholas II was born the 18th of May, 1869 in Saint Petersburg. He was christened his imperial highness Nicholas Aleksandrovitch Romanov, Grand Duke of Russia. When Nicholas was a child, he wasn't as bright as his younger brothers, which made his dad view Nicholas as a shy child, not "man enough" to become emperor of Russia. He never wanted to be the Czar of Russia, and his parents did not teach him enough for him to be ruler, he was much more of a...
    723 Words | 3 Pages
  • Tzar Nicholas Ii - Downfall of Russia
    It was Tzar Nicholas 2 political naivete and extreme obstinance that led to the downfall of the Russia


    Certain aspects of Tsar Nicholas 2's behaviour definitely contributed to bringing about the fall of the Russian Empire, however most of these qualities were not weaknesses in character as such, they were qualities we would associate with poor leadership. When we say ‘weakness in character' we mean being easily influenced/controlled by others. Nicholas himself...
    1,138 Words | 3 Pages
  • Nicholas Ii - 314 Words
    D3 5. How far was Nicholas II responsible for the fall of the Romanovs in 1917? Nicholas II being the last tsar of the Romanov dynasty that lasted for over 300 years, is accountable for the fall of the Romanovs in 1917, however, there are various other reasons too that involved in the ultimate fall of tsarism in Russia in February 1917. While Nicholas’s indecisiveness played a major role in portraying his negligence, the other factors that involved the fall of tsarism were, the declining...
    314 Words | 1 Page
  • Nicholas II Research - 3161 Words
    Nicholas II research: Source 1: “The daily work of a monarch he found intolerably boring. He could not stand listening long or seriously to ministers’ reports, or reading them.” Written by Kerensky in 1934. Kerensky was the leader of the government which took over when the Tsar abdicated in 1917. Source 3: “Nicholas II was not fit to run a village post office.” Said by an unknown cabinet minister Source 4: “He never had an opinion of his own … always agreeing with the judgement of the last...
    3,161 Words | 9 Pages
  • All Nicholas II of Russia Essays

  • tsar nicholas II - 3119 Words
    Nicholas II was the last tsar of Russia. He was deposed during the Russian Revolution and executed by the Bolsheviks. Nikolai Aleksandrovich Romanov was born near St Petersburg on 18 May 1868, the eldest son of Tsar Alexander III. When he succeeded his father in 1894, he had very little experience of government. In the same year, Nicholas married Princess Alexandra of Hesse-Darmstadt (a duchy in Germany). They had four daughters and a son, Alexis, who suffered from the disease haemophilia....
    3,119 Words | 8 Pages
  • Tsar Nicholas Ii - 377 Words
    Notes: Tsar Nicholas II ruled Russia from 1894 till 1917 when he abdicated following the revolution in March 1917. Nicholas II inherited Russia when it was in a very bad state, and although there were minor improvements during his reign, compared to many other countries it was very backward, perhaps then it was almost defiantly inevitable that sudden change was going to happen, however not necessarily in the form of revolution. The Tsar was in a difficult situation, but he had opportunities to...
    377 Words | 1 Page
  • Tsar Nicholas Ii - 964 Words
    Nicholas II abdicated the throne in 1917 up until then, the Russian Royal family had ruled for over three hundred years. Throughout this period, they faced many problems and uneasy predicaments, a lot of these centering on Nicholas II as Tsar. A combination of long and short-term problems led to the decline and eventual fall of the Romanov dynasty. Tsar Nicholas II ignored these issues, staying true to his coronation vow to uphold Autocracy, and therefore played a critical role in the plummet...
    964 Words | 3 Pages
  • Tsar Nicholas II - 2427 Words
    In 1894, at the age of 26, Nicholas II became Tsar of Russia as a result of his father, Alexander III's, passing away. When he acquired the throne he cried because he wasn't ready to be king. Spoken by Nicholas himself, he said, “I am not yet ready to be Tsar. I know nothing of the business of ruling” (Lieven, 1993). However, ascending the throne was something that Nicholas had to do with no other choice in the matter. Before Nicholas became Tsar the people of Russia already disliked the Romanov...
    2,427 Words | 7 Pages
  • Tsar Nicholas Ii - 1357 Words
    To what extent was the Tsar to blame for his downfall in March 1917? Tsar Nicholas II was rightfully blamed for his downfall in March 1917. His revolting actions resulting in detrimental impacts on Russia made him solely to blame for his abdication. Politically, socially and through War, Nicholas was to great extent his own reason of causing his downfall. There were numerous political challenges Tsar Nicholas encountered through his reign as ruler, with the majority a direct consequence...
    1,357 Words | 4 Pages
  • What Challenges Faced the Tsar Nicholas Ii of Russia Between 1894-1917?
    Before 1917 in Russia there was one supreme ruler with full autocratic power, there were no elected policies by law and the tsar was seen to have been put into his position by god. Between 1894-1917 the tsar came under pressure generally not suffered by any of his predecessors. The opposition came from four main sides; The government and reform; the actual character of Nicholas II hindered his time in office, for example his outlooks on situations meant he did not trust a lot of his...
    876 Words | 3 Pages
  • Nicholas Tsar Ii - 623 Words
    When one attempts to answer the question of whether or not “Tsar Nicholas was fit to rule Russia” one must consider three main points, his character, his attitudes, the problems facing Russia at the time and how he dealt with them. Essentially, Tsar didn’t have the emotional stability and desire to rule, that a ruler should possess and his neglecting of his country, would prove to eventually see an end to the Romanov dynasty in 1918. To be a successful leader one must first posses the...
    623 Words | 2 Pages
  • Events in the Life of Tsar Nicholas Ii
    Tsar Nicholas II was the last Tsar of Russia. From his accession to the throne in 1894 to his murder in 1918, he appeared to be plagued by ill fate and a weak will. His stoicism and reluctance towards change painted him as an inexperienced and cruel leader. His actions and the circumstances thrust upon him proved to alter the course of Russia's history. On 30th July 1904, the Tsar's prayers were answered. His wife finally gave birth to a longed-for baby boy, thus providing an heir to the...
    609 Words | 2 Pages
  • Russia - 722 Words
    The main cause of the collapse of the Tsarist regime in Russia in 1917 was the First World War. Do you agree? Explain your answer. In 1917 the rule of the Romanovs over Russia collapsed and Tsar Nicholas was forced to abdicate. He then offered the throne to his brother, who refused. There were many causes to the collapse of the Tsarist regime in 1917, including the First World War. Russia entered the First World War for different reasons, including: to improve Tsar’s reputation in front of...
    722 Words | 2 Pages
  • Russia - 14860 Words
    Red – Hard questions and haven’t come up before, Yellow – Very unlikely questions OCR B: Russia in Turmoil, 1900-1924 - All Possible Essays Questions with Plans (By Harry Bojakowski and Scarlett Stock [04.2013]) 1. 1905 1. Why did Tsarism become so unpopular with some groups by 1905? Throughout the centuries leading up to the 20 , Russia had been ruled by the Romanov dynasty via autocracy. This lead to large periods of stagnation and extremely old-fashioned ways while the rest of...
    14,860 Words | 42 Pages
  • How effectively did Nicholas II deal with the problems facing Russia in the period 1894 – 1905?
    How effectively did Nicholas II deal with the problems facing Russia in the period 1894 – 1905? It is one of the ironies of Russian history that, at a time when the nation most needed a tsar of strength and imagination, it was a man of weakness and limited outlook who came to the throne. Nicholas II was the eldest son of Tsar Alexander III. When he succeeded his father in 1894, he had very little experience of government. There are two main aspects to Nicholas’ II’s reign; firstly the problems...
    821 Words | 3 Pages
  • A Brief Overview of the Fall of Tsar Nicholas Ii
    Generally referred to as the 'Last Tsar', his short but significant reign ushered in a revolutionary political system that would change the world. He claimed his throne unprepared after the sudden death of his father "Alexander III". His father rarely taught him the things necessary to control an empire as big as Russia and shortly after this, the country quickly fell into turmoil. Many unfortunate incidents occurred during his rule, the first one being at his corronation in Moscow...
    1,072 Words | 3 Pages
  • 1. Describe the key features of the government of Russia under Nicholas II before the revolution in February 1917? (6)
    The government was an autocracy which meant that all power resided in the hands of the Tsar. Nicholas II, however, had a weak and stubborn personality. He was not willing to share his authority with the Duma (parliament) and his government relied on oppression to remain in power. The army and Okhrana (secret police) were used to stamp out protests. A further key feature was that the government was dependent on a narrow social base of aristocratic supporters, which left it vulnerable to...
    286 Words | 1 Page
  • Wht Did Nicholas Ii Survive the 1905 Revolution?
    The Russian revolution of 1905 (hereafter referred to as “the revolution”) was a protest against the Tsar's refusal to make political concessions, and that once the concessions were given; the revolution was doomed to failure. The opposition was disorganized and not united in its objectives, and that generally the people of Russia still revered the Tsar, despite his faults. A notable feature of the revolution is how little a part the revolutionaries actually played. Hardly any of them were...
    807 Words | 2 Pages
  • Tsar Nicholas II and Problems He Faced
     HISTORY ESSAY: How serious were the problems facing the Tsar, Nicholas II from 1894-1905? Alongside the other serious problems the Tsar encountered, one main concerning battle was with himself, which many concurred with by the end of 1905. Nicholas II fell into the notion that the throne was reserved for him by the will of god, thus thought he didn’t have to take measures to politically modernise, and establish Russia in general. This deluded perception brought about many serious problems...
    843 Words | 3 Pages
  • Explain why Nicholas II dissolved the first two Dumas in 1906 and 1907
    Explain why Nicholas II dissolved the first two Dumas in 1906 and 1907 12 mark plan P: The most important reason that N2 dissolved the first Duma in 1906 is because they were too radical and unneeded. E: as the Duma mainly consisted of mainly kadets (constitutional democrats) having the majority of seats (182). One of the first acts was ‘Address to the throne’ in which they asked for things like abolition of the state council and the transfer of ministerial power to the Duma. E: N2 found this...
    349 Words | 1 Page
  • How Did Tsar Nicholas Ii Play a Role in His Own Downfall?
    What role did Nicholas II play in his downfall? It can be seen by anybody that Nicholas II indeed played a huge role in his downfall. This downfall portrayed political, social and economical failures. Firstly, Nicholas’ abhorrent autocratic beliefs and his infamous ways of maintaining it contributed to his downfall. Also, the infamous massacre known as “Bloody Sunday” also contributed to his downfall, and finally the decision Nicholas made to fight in the Japanese and First World Wars all led...
    1,222 Words | 4 Pages
  • How Far Was Nicholas Ii Responsible for His Own Downfall?
    How far was Nicholas II responsible for his own downfall? In 1917 Tsar Nicholas II signed a deliration to abdicate from power; this was due to a number of long term and short term factors; some being of Nicolas II own problems and some being general problems that faced Nicholas II. When Tsar Nicholas II came to power many problems faced him, such as lack of industrial revolution, political problems, economical problems etc… Nicholas II was a very strong believer in autocracy and the belief...
    1,510 Words | 4 Pages
  • Why did Tsar Nicholas II fall from power in 1917?
    The cause of Tsar Nicholas II downfall is controversial but I believe there are three main reasons for it. Rasputin and the Russian people’s resentment towards his influence over Nicholas contributed significantly. However, world war one was also a discernible cause of the downfall of the Tsar due to the terrible state it left the country in and the negative effects this had on the people. The most important contributing factor to Nicolas’ downfall was himself because he was an ineffective,...
    1,998 Words | 5 Pages
  • Was Tsar Nicholas II mainly to blame for the 1905 Revolution?
    Was Tsar Nicholas II mainly to blame for the 1905 Revolution? In 1905, the social and economic tensions building up within Russia boiled over into Revolution. It was described by Lenin as the “Great Dress Rehearsal” for the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917 and may give us clues as to why the 1917 revolution started. The suggestion that Tsar Nicholas II and his actions were to blame for this revolution is debatable and there are many factors such as the repressive Tsarist system, the growth of...
    1,051 Words | 3 Pages
  • Nicholas Romanov - 1548 Words
    Essay On Nicholas Romanov "Nicholas Romanov was an ignorant, incompetent and insensitive leader. His character was the decisive factor in bringing on the revolution" "The last Tsar of Russia was a tragic figure a classic case of being a leader in the wrong place at the wrong time. Nothing within his power could have prevented the forces of change from overtaking Tsarist Russia." To what extent do you agree with these explanations of the collapse of autocracy in Russia? Nicholas...
    1,548 Words | 4 Pages
  • Nicholas Romanov - 597 Words
    Essay Question ‘Asses how successful Nicholas II was in addressing the problems of Russia'. Nicholas II was the last of the Romanov dynasty rule as the Czar of Russia. His rule began on 1st of November and finished on the 15th of 1917. During the time of Nicholas’s reign Russia saw him go from the great and powerful “little father” to a much more dishonorable and weak “bloody Nicholas”. Nicholas II was unsuccessful and the reason behind all of Russia’s many downfalls such as WW1 and the...
    597 Words | 2 Pages
  • Tsar Nicholas - 2003 Words
    What role did Nicholas II play in his own downfall? Nicholas II played, by far the biggest role in his downfall as the Tsar of Russia. Certain aspects of his behaviour definitely contributed to bringing down the Russian empire, however most of these qualities were not weaknesses in character but qualities associated with poor leadership. By weakness, I mean being easily influenced and controlled by others. Nicholas was a firm believer in autocracy and was virtually unmoveable in this belief....
    2,003 Words | 5 Pages
  • Russia Questions - 1352 Words
    Russia Long Term: Chapter 3&4 Chapter 3 1- What is the message in source one? Source one is a Marxist view of Russia in 1901. The layers in the illustration, from the top, say: “The royal family”, “we rule you”, “We mislead you”, “We shoot you” and the bottom layer says “we work for you and feed you”. 2- How is the view of the monarchy and the church different from that suggested in Source 2? 3- What clues are there in this manifesto to the Tsar’s attitude to his future...
    1,352 Words | 5 Pages
  • russia essay - 1377 Words
    Which of Russia’s rulers from 1855-1964 was the most successful in serving the interests of the Russian people best? Throughout the period 1856-1964 there was much continuity in the needs of the Russian people. The world around Russia was constantly developing, and Russia was increasingly falling behind. The Russian people needed a strong and stable leader that would address all of the needs of the Russian people, including political, social and economic issues. Not all of the issues were being...
    1,377 Words | 4 Pages
  • Russia CCOT - 631 Words
    Lisa Wang CCOT Essay APW/ Mr. Symons 2­27­15 Russia is a nation that has faced many changes and continuities over the decades. Though large in size, Russia has always been seen as a backwards nation. Though many nations had already moved on from feudalism and were riding the waves of The Industrial Revolution, Russia did not abolish Serfdom until 1861. There were many changes in government from 1801 ...
    631 Words | 1 Page
  • Czar Nicholas and Alexandra - 634 Words
    Nicholas and Alexandra The film Nicholas and Alexandra should be presented in the future to incoming classes of European History II because it shows important events, portrays the life of Russia in a realistic way, and is very entertaining without sacrificing the factor of enriching what a student learns. Many important events that lead to and are involved in the revolution are displayed accurately throughout the movie. The movie shows Alexis right after he is born, the Duma Bloody Sunday...
    634 Words | 2 Pages
  • How Far Was World War One Responsible for the Overthrow of Nicholas Ii, 1917?
    How far was WWI responsible for the overthrow of the Tsar, February 1917? The First World War was indeed a major cause of the Tsar's overthrow in the February Revolution. However, it was not the sole factor – rather, it was a catalyst and a focus that allowed all the other preexisting factors to boil over into revolution. The First World War caused a multitude of problems for the peasants of Russia, both at home and on the front. The vast majority of conscripts were from farming villages,...
    967 Words | 3 Pages
  • Asses the reasons why Tsar Nicholas II was able to survive the 1905 Revolution
     Assess the reasons why tsar Nicholas II was able to survive the 1905 revolution. In October of 1905, a united resistance was formed in affiliation with the ambition to overthrow Nicholas II, Tsar of Russia. This united opposition, which still stands as one of the biggest anarchistic events in Romanov history, transpired shortly after the events of the ‘bloody Sunday’ massacre. Nicholas managed to retain his thrown throughout the revolution; many factors assisted in this sustainment,...
    1,139 Words | 4 Pages
  • Fhow Far Did Russia Experience a Period of “Reaction” Following the Assassination of Alexander Ii?
    How far did Russia experience a period of “reaction” following the assassination of Alexander II? On 13 March 1881, Tsar Alexander II was assassinated by the populist terrorist group the “People’s Will”, due to the reforms he had created, although he was on the way to give Russia its first national assembly before his death. Therefore his son Alexander III became Tsar in place of his deceased father. Immediately, Alexander III turned his back on all the reforms created by his father, and he...
    1,587 Words | 4 Pages
  • Russia Change over Time
    With many new factors making the world globalized and as steps were taken toward modernization in the 1700s, the world underwent many changes, however still keeping some of its initial traditions. From 1700-1900 in Eastern Europe, the economy had switched from agricultural to manufacturing due to the growth of factories and industry in the 1800s and serfdom was abolished, however the tsars still remained the center of authority. In 1700, the world was becoming globalized as the New World was...
    843 Words | 3 Pages
  • Which of the previous Tsars were most to blame for the problems inherited by Nicholas II when he ascended to the throne in 1894?
    Which of the previous Tsars were most to blame for the problems inherited by Nicholas II when he ascended to the throne in 1894? When Nicholas II ascended the throne in 1894 he wasn’t facing any single issue left by a single Tsar he was facing the culmination of the three previous rulers’ mistakes that they had left behind or inherited and made worse. However the biggest problems had arguably been left by Russia’s most “liberal” Tsar, Alexander I. Nicholas I faced a multitude of...
    953 Words | 3 Pages
  • russia revision guide - 7465 Words
     Russia possible essay questions: Collapse Reform and reaction, 1855–1881 Why did Alexander II order the emancipation of the serfs in 1861? (12 marks) Crimean War defeat His own beliefs Political considerations Why did defeat in the Crimean War lead to reform under Alexander II? (12 marks) Inadequate army training suggested Russia was not an “elite state” Social unrest caused by the defeat Pressure from intellectuals Explain why Alexander II introduced further reforms following the...
    7,465 Words | 24 Pages
  • Russia 19th Century - 766 Words
    Russia in the nineteenth century Government & Society: * Autocracy (a system of government with one person with total power) was a system that was on going in 19th century Russia. It was led by the Tsar. * Beneath the Tsar were The Court, who were leading landowners and members of the government. * Below them were a small group of businessmen and traders. * The majority of the population were Serfs who were servants attached to land owned by a lord. They were required to...
    766 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Fall of Tsarist Russia - 2278 Words
    The Fall of Tsarist Russia, The Rise of the Soviet Union. “To the very end, through its inflexibility and ineptness, the autocracy had been the principal architect of its own downfall. -Christopher Read Russia, prior to the rise of the Communist powers, was a simple country, with the Romanov bloodline at its helm. The country, with its sprawling landmass and spread out population, was perhaps one of the least developed countries in Europe. (Bruner) While the rest of the world...
    2,278 Words | 7 Pages
  • Russia Before 1881 - 773 Words
    History Russia before 1881 The rulers of Russia before 1855 were regarded as reactionary autocrats, unwilling to consider any political or social change. The rulers in Russia: 1855-1881 Tsar Alexander II Absolute Monarchy 1881-1894 Tsar Alexander III Tsar Alexander II received the title ‘Tsar Liberator” because he instituted important liberal changes such as the emancipation of...
    773 Words | 3 Pages
  • Impact of WWI on Russia - 689 Words
    Impact of WW1 on Russia Social and economic: The war proved an economic disaster for Russia, the direct cost of war rose from 1,500 million roubles in 1914 to 14,500 million in 1918. And this was an expense of the rural or industrial workforce, thus production slumped and in any case in time of war the country needed to be producing more, not less to feed and supply its armies Military problems: Although the Russian government managed to mobilise around 15 million men between 14-17,...
    689 Words | 2 Pages
  • Alexander II and Alexander III
    The Accomplishments and Failures of the 19th Century Tsars The nineteenth century was filled with a variety of tsars. There are two that deserve a great amount of focus: Alexander II and Alexander III. Alexander II hoped to change and resolve Russia and their social and economic problems. His son, Alexander III, was more conservative and wished to undo everything his father did. Alexander II ascended the throne at the age of thirty-seven. He was tsar of Russia from 1855-1881. Alexander II...
    1,026 Words | 3 Pages
  • Alexander II and the Emancipation of the Serfs
    For what reasons, and with what effects, did the Tsar Alexander II Emancipate the Serfs? “The existing condition of owning souls cannot remain unchanged. It is better to begin to destroy serfdom from above than to wait until that time when it begins to destroy itself from below” After the defeat in the Crimean war Alexander II knew that he had to make new choices if he wanted Russia to get its reputation back, since it had lost its great martial power, which the country took pride...
    1,083 Words | 3 Pages
  • Alexander Ii & Alexander Iii
    Alexander II & Alexander III Alexander was the eldest son of Tsar Nicholas I and was born in Moscow in 1818. Alexander became Tsar of Russia in 1855 after his father's death. At that time Russia was in the Crimean War but then in 1856 russia signed the Treaty of Paris that put an end to the war. Alexander knew that his military power wasn't strong enough anymore and his advisers informed him that Russia's economy is not even close enough to be competed with industrialized nations such as...
    586 Words | 2 Pages
  • Late Imperial Russia, 1890-1917
    Late imperial Russia 1890-1917: how was Russia set up to be the nation it is today? Introduction: ‘Imperial Russia’ all started in the 17th century where a man named Tsar Ivan IV ‘the terrible’ battled and defeated the Mongols which were the previous rulers of Russia. He appointed himself the emperor of Russia and his heirs would carry on his principles and his way of ruling throughout the century’s to build a strong nation. The Tsars of the Romanov dynasty would carry on ruling till the last...
    2,350 Words | 6 Pages
  • Russia Notes as/A2 1881-1914
    Russian History 1881 – 1914 What was Russia like in 1881? • 82% of the population were illiterate peasant farmers. • No technology was used on farms – subsistence farming. • Largest standing army in Europe. • No political parties and the press was heavily censored. • Fierce loyalty to the Tsar – often enforced by brutal secret police. • Royalty owned most of the land – Tsar’s estate was larger than some countries. • 1861 – Tsar Alexander II...
    7,263 Words | 27 Pages
  • Was Tsar Nicholas the Second Fit to Rule
    In this essay I am going to be having a look at whether Tsar Nicholas II was fit to rule Russia during his reign. Who was Tsar Nicholas II? : He was the leader of Russia during 1894 – 1917 of which he was then overthrown. He was an Autocrat. He had not been elected into his position as the Tsar, but he was born into the job, this meant that he was not loved by the people as much as if they had elected him to be Tsar. To help Tsar to rule he had ministers, these were his friends and family...
    511 Words | 2 Pages
  • Alexander II vs Alexander III
    Compare and contrast the domestic policies of Alexander II and Alexander III Alexander II and his successor and son, Alexander III, inherited Russia in different states and degrees of turmoil. Due to these pressures, both were required to make alterations to the systems in place, such as that of politics and economics. However the natures of their crisis were different and therefore the subsequent modifications varied and were, in many cases, controversial. Alexander II came to power in...
    752 Words | 3 Pages
  • comparing alexander II and alexander III
    Compare and contrast the social and economic policies of Alexander II (1855-81) and Alexander III (1881-94) of Russia. Alexander II and Alexander III were both Tsars of Russia and they both believed in the divine will to rule the people. However Alexander II is said to be more liberal than Alexander III though they were both conservative in one way or the other in their social and economic policies because they both wanted to remain with the power over the people. Alexander II was more...
    877 Words | 3 Pages
  • How well was Russia ruled in the 20th century
    How well was Russia ruled in the 20th century In 1905 all the tensions in Russia culminated in a revolution that nearly swept the Tsar from power. He had started a war with Japan in the hope that a quick victory would bring a surge of patriotism; however a series of humiliating defeats brought just the opposite. There were strikes in the factories and street demonstrations. In January 1905 a demonstration was fired on by the Cossacks and many were killed, this day is now known as Bloody...
    429 Words | 2 Pages
  • World War I: Circumstances for Revolution in Russia
    Sir George Buchanan summarized the overriding factor in the lead up to the February Revolution of 1917 when he said about the Tsar, “although his loyalty to his Allies remained unshaken to the last, it was his failure to harness the loyalty of his own people which eventually cost him his throne”. The crux of the revolution was the people’s belief that they were abandoned by the Tsar during World War I. Although the Tsar was well supported early on in the campaign his tentative star steeply...
    398 Words | 1 Page
  • Russia in revolution 1881 1917 revision booklet
    Why was Russia hard to rule in 1881? (Task: add key details to each of the areas on the mind map). How far did Alexander III reform Russia 1881-92? (Task: Identify the different reforms that Alexander III put in place. Write each reform onto the continuum – place it on the line based on how far you think it reformed Russia. Underneath the continuum explain why you placed the factor where you did – try to give some specific reasons/examples of its effects). Opposition groups (Task: Answer the...
    405 Words | 2 Pages
  • How Stable Was Russia in 1906-1914
    Between 1906-1914 there were many problems occurring which was affecting the stability of Russia and Nicholas II’s autocratic regime. Soon after the 1905 revolution, there was still much tension present in Russia in the early years, but by 1914 greater stability had been achieved through a series of social, economical and political policies that had been brought about, although the underlying factor was that the causes of the revolution were not dealt with properly, thus an illusion of stability...
    1,283 Words | 3 Pages
  • Had Russia reached a point of stabilty by 1914
    ‘Russia had reached a point of stability by 1914’ How far is thisanaccurate description of the periods between 1905-14. Russia was in a period of instability during 1905-1914. The political, social and economic change that occurred-such as Stolypin’s reforms and the Tzar’s new political developments (Duma)- caused widespread disappointment, sparked uprisings and increased the support of the opposition....
    1,225 Words | 4 Pages
  • Was World War One Responsible for Nicholas Ii's Downfall?
    Emily Hawkins How far do you agree that Nicholas II’s downfall was caused by World War 1? 1914 was a devastating year for many countries of the world, as world war one began to take full effect. But as world war one shook the world; it began to question Nicholas II’s ability to rule Russia. In this essay i will discuss the extent of world war one’s responsibility in Nicholas II’s downfall, and the extent of other contributing factors. I will argue that Nicholas II’s own traits as a leader...
    1,429 Words | 4 Pages
  • To what extent did Russia undergo economic and political change?
    To what extent did Russia undergo economic and political reform in the years 1906-14? – Sam Puckey During the period of the four dumas, of 1906-14, the regime re-established its control through harsh repression, but also brought in some significant reforms to reduce the likelihood of another revolution. Whether these measures went far enough to do this is doubtful, but their impact is impossible to judge accurately because new problems caused by the WWI confuse the picture. Peter Stolypin, the...
    1,067 Words | 3 Pages
  • War was an important cause of change in Russia during the period 1855
    To what extent did war act as a catalyst for change in Russia between 1855 and 1924 War was an important cause of change in Russia during the period 1855-1924 and arguably was the most important cause but it was certainly not the only one. Other factors such as the influence of key individuals played a great part in determining change in Russia and should be considered to be very important as well. Russia had been heavily defeated in the Crimean war and this consequently was the most important...
    1,389 Words | 4 Pages
  • How far was Russia a modern industrialised state by 1904? (24 marks)
    How far was Russia a modern industrialised state by 1904? (24 marks) Despite the relatively successful industrial reforms implemented by Vyshnegradsky and Witte, Russia was by no means a modern nation. By 1904 Alexander III had taken back any political concessions that had been given and the Zemstva was a tool of the nobles who controlled the monopoly on voting. Russian technology was decades behind the west, Russia was the last of the ‘great powers’ to industrialise thus found it difficult to...
    761 Words | 2 Pages
  • Did the Provisional Government face an impossible task in Russia in 1917
    Plan for Question: To what extent is it true to say that the Provisional Government faced an impossible task? Threat of Political Opposition - Soviets had more power than any other ‘body’; this was because they were looked upon as the legitimate authority in the land. - They shared a dual authority with the Soviets. The All-Russia Soviet claimed the right to issue laws. From Feb to Oct 1917, major areas of policy to be agreed upon by both. The Petrograd Soviet was the closest and also the...
    555 Words | 2 Pages
  • how far did stolypin help to stabilise russia between 1905 and 1911?
    To what extent was Stolypin effective in stabilising Russia between 1906 and 1911? The period previous to 1906 was one of great instability in Russia, 1905 saw a failed revolution after long term tensions. Stolypin was effective yet ruthless in his peasant control in the 1905 revolution and due to this he soon became chairman of ministers in 1906. He introduced many new policies in an attempt to stabilise Russia, though as to if these were effective remains debatable. Stabilising Russia would...
    1,286 Words | 3 Pages
  • Main Problems Facing Russia in 1894 & How Had They Been Dealt with by 1914
    The last Tsar Nicholas II ascended the throne in 1894 and was faced with a country that was trying to free itself from its autocratic regime. The serfs had recently been emancipated, the industry and economy was just starting to develop and opposition to the Tsar was building up. Russia was still behind Europe in terms of the political regime, the social conditions and the economy. Nicholas II who was a weak and very influenced by his mother and his wife had to deal with Russia’s troubles during...
    1,691 Words | 5 Pages
  • How far had Russia made Political, Social and Economic Progress before 1914
    How far had Russia made Political, Social and Economic Progress before 1914 On the one hand, Russia had made Political, Social and Economic progress before 1914 due to a number of reforms. Beginning with progress, A Duma had been instated which gave the middle class a feeling of a little more authority. There was a right form political parties which resulted in over 20 different political parties which ranged to extreme to democratic and had 524 deputies. The Tsar had appointed Pyotr...
    1,067 Words | 3 Pages
  • How far do you agree that the government and economy of Tsarist Russia was transformed in the years between 1881 and 1914?
     There were many changes made to the government and economy of Tsarist Russia between 1881 and 1914, however fundamentally I do not think either were completely transformed as the country was still under almost complete control of the Tsar and the majority of people had a very limited political voice, and also the economy remained a major issue with few problems solved. Considering that in 1881 Russia was incredibly underdeveloped and mainly based on agriculture, there were many changes...
    1,181 Words | 4 Pages
  • To what extent did Russia undergo economic and political reform in the years 1906-14?
    To what extent did Russia undergo economic and political reform in the years 1906-14? After the 1905 revolution Russia was in need of reforms both economically and politically, to allow it maintain its role of a great power and to prevent another revolution occurring the answer to this was the October Manifesto. However, due to the stubbornness of the Tsar who was determined not to relinquish his autocratic powers, what may have appeared as reforms were largely superficial making little...
    1,012 Words | 3 Pages
  • To what extent did Russia undergo economic and political reform in the years 1906-1914
    Mollie Bentley –Rowe To what extent did Russia undergo economic and political reform in the years 1906 – 1914? Russia underwent economic and political reform to a limited extent. Although Peter Stolypin was pushing for reform, he was undermined by the mindsets of peasants and the fundamental law. From the years 1906 – 1914, Peter Stolypin was pushing to de – revolutionise the peasantry and put into place economic reform, and there is evidence of this working. During these years...
    1,040 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Main Reason Why Russia Was Considered Backwards Was the Agricultural Economy. How Far Do You Agree with This Statement?
    16/09/12 Sam Lardner The main reason why Russia was considered backwards was the agricultural economy. How far do you agree with this statement? Plan: Introduction: Short intro into main points, Geography, Economy, Politics and Society Structure. Explain that the supposed factor is important in relation to the question however, there are other...
    1,394 Words | 4 Pages
  • Witte And Stolypin Essay For Wilcock
    History essay: Andrew Gilman To what extent were Russian industry and agriculture transformed in the years 1881-1914? Over the years 1881 to 1914, in relation to Russia’s industry and agriculture, multiple transformations occurred due to the decisions of both Peter Stolypin and Sergei Witte. These transformations as a whole from both men were successful in moving Russia forward and improving the areas of which they focused. For example Witte improved Russia’s production of raw material during...
    1,243 Words | 3 Pages
  • Was Peter Stolypin the Tsar's last hope?
    Do you think Peter Stolypin was the Tsar’s last hope? The 1905 Revolution was the build up of the dissatisfaction of Russia’s people with the government. Tsar Nicholas II had turned to key individuals such as Peter Stolypin to save the Tsarist regime. Stolypin, Russian Prime Minister from 1906 – 1911, had addressed a number of problems which threatened Tsarism by appeasing opposition and therefore putting down revolutionary attitudes. His reforms certainly did help gain back some of the...
    1,050 Words | 3 Pages
  • Extent Of Russian Reforms 1906 14
    Isabelle Stanley To What Extent Did Russia Undergo Economic and Political Reform 1906­1914? After the 1905 ‘Revolution’ Russia was in desperate need of both political and economic reforms: to maintain its status as an international great power and to prevent future revolutions. There is much debate as to whether the changes made were effective or just an act of superficial appeasement. In my opinion the reforms had too many strings attached to be noteworthy. ...
    896 Words | 1 Page
  • The Decline And Fall Of The Romanov Dynasty
    Nicholas II came to the throne during an arduous time in Russian history. It was a combination of factors, including his political ineptitude that led to the fall of the Romanov dynasty and eventually cost Nicholas II, the Tsarina Alexandra and their five children their lives. Russia was late in modernising, partly due to the Tsar?s lack of reforms, and was behind Britain, France and the United States. Russia was also slow to emerge from feudalism, and was undergoing difficulty as industrial and...
    1,455 Words | 4 Pages
  • W.B.Yeats and Thomas Hardy - 446 Words
    Common Literary Techniques 1. Imagery: It is the use of figurative language to create visual representations of actions, objects and ideas in our mind in such a way that they appeal to our physical senses. For example: The room was dark and gloomy. -The words “dark” and “gloomy” are visual images. The river was roaring in the mountains. – The word “roaring” appeals to our sense of hearing. 2. Simile and Metaphor: Both compare two distinct objects and draws similarity between them. The...
    446 Words | 2 Pages
  • Explain the reasons for the fall of the Romanovs
    Explain the reasons for the fall of the Romanovs The cause of the fall of the Romanov dynasty in 1917 was a result of long-term causes including Tsar Alexander’s inability to satisfy his people and Tsar Nicholas II’s inability to rule to throne all together. The Bloody Sunday event, the war with Germany, Rasputin and Tsars bad decisions was also some of the causes which led the Romanovs to fall. It all began in 1894 when Alexander III, died leaving his son Nicholas II to become the tsar of...
    587 Words | 2 Pages
  • The October Manifesto and Grievances of the Russian People
    Assess the extent to which the grievances of the Russian people were addressed by the October Manifesto The grievances amongst the Russian people were addressed to some extent by the passing of the October Manifesto. The laws passed in the October Manifesto were designed to benefit the working class as well as prevent an outbreak of violence and an imminent revolution. Stolypin was appointed as the chairman of ministers for the Duma. Which had been created in the hope to please the working...
    961 Words | 3 Pages
  • Short and Long Term Factors Leading to Rasputin's Murder
    What were the short and long-term factors that lead to the murder of Rasputin? Grigory Yefimovich ‘Rasputin’ (meaning ‘debauched one’) was a Siberian monk, described by Jennifer Brainard (2008) as “an unwashed sexually promiscuous peasant”. Rasputin was born in 1869, arrived in St Petersburg in 1904 and was first connected to the Romanov family in 1908 when he was called upon to aid Tsar Nicholas II’s only son in his illness (Jennifer Rosenberg, unknown date, The Murder of Rasputin). Eight...
    1,304 Words | 4 Pages
  • How far do you agree that the overthrow of the Romanov dynasty was a result of the First World War?
    After the riots of 1917, the Tsarist regime collapsed, and many would argue that it was mainly as a result of the First World War beginning in 1914. War broke out in 1914, with Tsar Nicholas becoming commander-in-chief in 1915, meaning he was away from Petrograd. Not only was this poorly thought out by Nicholas because it gave the people an opportunity to plot against him, but as he was away he left Tsarina (also a German princess), Alexandra, in charge during his absence. Due to the war...
    1,166 Words | 3 Pages
  • Rasputin - 533 Words
    Often, there are many rumors regarding Rasputin. Some call him a "mad monk" and believe that he held powers greater than any normal human. The big question is this: how can a peasant with hardly any influence, make his inner way into the royal family? Well, let's start from the beginning. Rasputin was born in 1869, and was raised in a Siberian village. As a young man, he had a very bad reputation. Rasputin was often the troublemaker, and would frequently get drunk. He also sexually harassed...
    533 Words | 2 Pages
  • History - 1023 Words
    Michael Garner Assess the view that the First World War was the main cause of the collapse of Romanov rule There were many reasons why the Romanov rule fell in the year 1917. I personally believe that the war was a major reason which led to the Tsar to abdicate but I also believe there are many other reasons which led to the Tsar to abdicate. I believe that one of the main reasons for the Tsar’s abdication and the collapse of the Romanov rule was the poor state which Russia was in....
    1,023 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Mystery of Anastasia Romanov - 827 Words
    My childhood was an eventful time for me in the form of animated movies. From Disney to Pixar, I was hooked. One very underappreciated movie that I have always kept close to my heart; that movie is Anastasia, by Fox Entertainment. This was a semi-fictional movie that was based off the unsolved mystery of the unsolved mystery of the survival of the youngest daughter of Tsar Nicholas II of Russia, the last sovereign of Imperial Russia, Grand Duchess Anastasia Romanov Nikolaevna. This was one of my...
    827 Words | 3 Pages
  • Anastasia: the Movie Novel
    Short Summary: Anastasia is an exciting fictional tale partly based on the Russian Revolution and the real life Romanov family. The timely story begins in St. Petersburg, Russia in 1916 during a ceremonial celebration for the Czar of Imperial Russia, Nicholas. He and his wife had four beautiful daughters and a son, with the youngest daughter being Anastasia. Her grandmother, The Dowager Empress Marie is leaving for Paris and she gives Anastasia a music box and necklace as a goodbye present....
    397 Words | 1 Page
  • Rasputin Essay - 1723 Words
    Did you ever wonder what brought about the Russian Revolution in the year 1917? Grigori Efimovich Rasputin and his actions were one of the main causes of the Revolution that ended the Romanov Dynasty. He was born on January 23, 1872 in Pokrovskoye, Siberia to Anna Egorovna and Efim Akovlevich Rasputin. At the age of eighteen, Rasputin claimed that he was visited by the Holy Virgin of Kazan. He then became convinced that God had chosen him for a special purpose that he would find out later in his...
    1,723 Words | 5 Pages
  • The positive and negative effects of Russian Industrialization
    Industrialization has been a key factor in the development of nations worldwide. Like every movement, industrialization is followed by both positive and negative effects. The industrialization of Russia was no exception to this theory. In 1861, under the rule of Alexander II, Russia moved into an active period of social and political reform that established the base for industrialization. It wasn't until the 1890's that Russia finally entered the industrial age. This was due, in part, to the...
    519 Words | 2 Pages
  • RASPUTIN SEX MANIAC OR HOLY MAN
    WHYMAN TIMES RASPUTIN: SEX MANIAC OR HOLY MAN? Grigory Rasputin, a strongly religious peasant, who eventually applied a powerful influence over Nicholas II and Aleksandra, the last Tsar and Tsarina of Imperial Russia. He is one of the most mysterious and dark individuals of Russian history. Grigory Rasputin claimed that he was a starets (a holy man) from Siberia. It was rumoured he belonged to a religious sect, the Kylysty, who believed that the way to religious cloud nine lay in the senses....
    463 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Fall of the Romonov Dynasty - 1058 Words
    “To what extent was the inability of Nicholas II to bring about effective reforms responsible for the fall of the Romanov Dynasty” The inability of tsar Nicholas II to bring about effective reform was a fundamental cause to the eventual fall of the Romanov Dynasty. Years of discontent and ineffective or absent reform had resulted in widespread displeasure from the Russian public, and proved to be the catalyst for much of the protest and rebellion in the following years. However, whilst a...
    1,058 Words | 3 Pages
  • Comic Strip - 808 Words
    Literary Terms Allegory: Allegory is a figure of speech in which abstract ideas and principles are described in terms of characters, figures and events. It can be employed in prose and poetry to tell a story with a purpose of teaching an idea and a principle or explaining an idea or a principle. The objective of its use is to preach some kind of a moral lesson. Example: “Animal Farm”, written by George Orwell, is an allegory that uses animals on a farm to describe the overthrow of the last of...
    808 Words | 3 Pages
  • Romanovs - 458 Words
    List the Royal family members: (there are 11 to list) Tsar Nicholas II, Tsarina Alexandra, Olga, Tatiana, Maria, Anastasia, and Alexeiand ,Eugene Botkin, Anna Demidova, Alexei Trupp and Ivan Kharitonov 2. How many bodies were found in the burial site in Yekaterinburg, Siberia? 9 bodies 3. The three ways that the age of the skeletons can be assessed are: Pelvic regions, wisdom teeth and vertebrae. 4. The pubic bone can determine _______ from ______ as well as ___________. Male...
    458 Words | 2 Pages
  • Hist107 Final Paper - 1995 Words
     THE FALL OF THE ROMANOVS: AN ANALYSIS A Term Paper Submitted to Mr. Sashah B. Dioso In partial fulfilment of the requirements in History 107 (Modern History of Russia) Junauelle Kyla B. Andres Camille May B. Savillo BS Economics IV INTRODUCTION The Romanov dynasty was the last imperial dynasty to rule Russia. The Romanovs ruled Russia for almost three centuries, from 1613 until 1917, the year of its fall during the Bolshevik Revolution. The Romanovs were descendants of the...
    1,995 Words | 6 Pages
  • why the 1905 revolution failed
    Why the 1905 revolution failed The 1905 revolution failed due to many factors, all of which helped the Tsar government overcome the revolutionaries. The aim of the revolutionaries was to gain governmental reform, however the Tsar’s aim was not to lose power. One of the reasons that the 1905 revolution failed was due to the loyalty that Nicholas II had from his armed forces. With these armed forces the Tsar was able to crush the disturbances that were part of the revolution meaning that...
    688 Words | 2 Pages
  • How Far Was Ww1 the Main Cause of the Fall of the Romanovs in February 1917?
    How far was WW1 the main cause of the fall of the Romanovs in February 1917? Tsar Nicholas II was the head of the Romanov family who had ruled Russia for five generations from 1613 to 1762. When Nicholas had inherited the throne he married Alexandra Fyodorovna of Hesse, who was from Germany. They had five children together, but their popularity was starting to fall by 1914. When there was the outbreak of the war, the Russian people criticised Alexandra’s German heritage and Nicholas’s failure...
    735 Words | 2 Pages
  • Who Was Anna Anderson?
    Was Anna Anderson Anastasia? There have been many claims regarding whether or not Anna Anderson was Anastasia. There are several reports both agreeing and denying that this claim is true. Whether it is true or false no one will ever know. There can only be evidence to back up someone’s argument, even if its wrong. Anastasia Romanov was born June 5,1901. Her father was the Tsar Nicholas II of Russia. Her mother was Alexandra Fyordorvn, the granddaughter of Queen Victoria and her husband...
    796 Words | 2 Pages
  • What really happened to Grigori Rasputin?
     Final Case Study: What Really Happened to Grigori Rasputin Cynthia L. Moss Student ID: 4203947 American Military University Abstract Forensic anthropologists work on current criminal investigations and historical questions. For this assignment, the student will choose one modern forensic case and the forensic anthropologist who is/was associated with the case. The student will systematically identify the role of the forensic anthropologists in the recovery...
    1,393 Words | 4 Pages
  • Explain the Role of the First World War in the Decline and Fall of the Romanov Dynasty
    Explain the role of the First World War in the decline and fall of the Romanov Dynasty The role of the first world in the decline and fall of the Romanov Dynasty has been contended debated. Russia’s lack of resources and preparation can be seen to attribute to the fall of the dynasty as lack of items such as bread and coal ked to contention amongst Russia’s people. Also contributing was Tsar Nicholas II’s lack of military experience and ability to use military force to crush the civilian...
    1,946 Words | 5 Pages
  • The February/March Revolution How Far Would You Agree That the February/March Revolution That Overthrew the Russian Monarchy Was a “Spontaneous Uprising”? Answer This Question and Develop a Deep Analysis.
    The February/March Revolution How far would you agree that the February/March revolution that overthrew the Russian monarchy was a “spontaneous uprising”? Answer this question and develop a deep analysis. The second revolution in Russia at the time of World War One, following the first revolt in 1905, took place in February (March for the rest of Europe) of the year 1917. At the time, the conditions of the nation were strained under almost every aspect. The decision of the Tsar Nicholas II...
    1,881 Words | 5 Pages
  • Nikolai Alexandrovich Romanov - 676 Words
    Nickolai Alexandrovich Romanov, otherwise known as Czar Nicholas II was Russia’s last emperor. He was born in May of 1868 in Tsakoe Selo. He was the eldest son of Alexander III. He succeeded his father when he died in 1894. That same year Nicholas II married Princess Alexandra of Hesse – Darnstadt. She was the granddaughter of Queen Victoria. His wife was very unpopular with the Russian nobles, not only because she wasn’t Russian but also because she had a strange reliance upon Grigory Rasputin...
    676 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Decline and Fall if the Romanov dynasty.
    The Decline and Fall of the Romanov Dynasty In 1894, Tsar Alexander III died suddenly of Kidney failure at a very young age. His son, Nicholas II took over the position (he was only 26) through succession, not knowing that he would soon become the tsar who brought the Romanov rule to an end after more than 300 years of autocratic rule. The same year, Tsar Nicholas married Princess Alix (Alexandra) of Hesse-Darmstadt. The marriage was a love match. The couple were a perfect example of complete...
    1,855 Words | 5 Pages
  • Rasputin Speech - 805 Words
    Privet·stvie g-zha Kinghorne i drugimi tovarishchami. Segodnya vy uznaete o Rasputine. Greetings Mrs Kinghorne and fellow comrades. Today you will learn about Rasputin. Grigori Yefimovich Rasputin was born a peasant in the small village of Pokrovskoye in Siberia in 1869. At age 18 eighteen, Rasputin spent three months in the Verkhoturye Monastery. His experience there turned him towards the life of a religious mystic and wanderer. In 1901, he left his home in Pokrovskoye as a strannik (or...
    805 Words | 2 Pages
  • Transformation of Tsarist Russia's Economy
    How far do you agree that the economy of Tsarist Russia was transformed in the years to 1914? It can be argued that there was there was a change in the economy of Tsarist Russia in the years to 1914, but there is some debate to the extent of the transformation of the economy. It is undeniable that there is evidence in which shows there was a degree of change within Russia; this is shown through the actions of Sergi Witte, Stolypin and the four Dumas from the years 1906 to 1914. ...
    605 Words | 2 Pages
  • How Successful Were the Russian Governments in Promoting Economic Change and Modernisation Between 1881-1904?
    How successful were the Russian governments in promoting economic change and modernisation between 1881-1904? After the Crimean War (1854-56) the econmoy in Russia slowly begun to develop. Alexander II set the development of a railwail bulding programm and a limited spread of factories. But Russia's economy was still not as well-developed as that in western Europe. So a real industrialisation took of in the reign of Alexander III and the help of Nicholas II's finance minsters Ivan...
    629 Words | 2 Pages
  • What happened to the Romanovs? - 455 Words
    What happened to the Romanovs? The Romanovs were one of the biggest monarchy houses of Russian and World History, they ruled Russia for over a thousand years and their name was a sign of power and wealth. During the Russian Revolution of 1917 the power of the Zar Nicholas II was overthrown as a consequence; he, his entire family and four of their most loyal servants were arrested in the Ipatiev House until the day of their execution. They all lived isolated without having contact with...
    455 Words | 2 Pages
  • romanov essay - 4138 Words
    Essay Question: Discuss the economic, social and political grievances in Russia at the turn of the C20th and their contribution to the downfall of the Romanov Dynasty. Nicholas II, the last tsar of Russia, had neither the qualities nor the desire to rule imperial Russia. Born in Tsarskoye Selo in 1868, Nicholas was the eldest son of Alexander III, the fearsome tsar who had reimposed autocracy and oppression on the Russian empire after the murder of Alexander II. Those who met the young...
    4,138 Words | 11 Pages
  • What Are the Key Factors Which Lead to the Downfall of the Romanov Dynasty?
    What are the Key factors which lead to the downfall of the Romanov Dynasty? To what extent is Tsar Nicholas responsible for his demise? 1917 saw the conclusion of the reign of the Romanov Dynasty, as well as the demise of Russia’s last monarch, Tsar Nicholas II. It is evident that the downfall of the Romanov Dynasty was directly linked to key factors such as the autocratic style of the Romanov dynasty and the nature of the social structure, as well as the evolving nation of Russia, as a...
    2,120 Words | 6 Pages

All Nicholas II of Russia Essays