Musical film Essays & Research Papers

Best Musical film Essays

  • Emergence of Musical Film and Its Influence on Society
    Essay Question: Critically discuss and describe the emergence of musical film and its influence on society. "The musical is one of the most popular film genres among both audiences and film scholars, probably for many of the same reasons - the spectacle, the music and the enjoyable predictability of the outcome weighed against the pleasure of the varied details." Bill Marshall and Robynn Stilwell A proverb once claimed that "in life, you are either being entertained or educated. If you...
    3,483 Words | 11 Pages
  • Cabaret Film Anaylsis - 963 Words
    I directed Cabaret in 1971 and my main aim was to explore the nature of humans and how they behave in certain circumstances. Set in Berlin, 1931, the movie follows the lives of Sally Bowles and Brian Roberts through the struggles of living in Nazi Germany. Through the use of film techniques such as camera shot and angles, musical numbers, and repeated symbols, the viewer perceives how what contributes to the decisions people make, and how this affects their lives. The use of camera shots and...
    963 Words | 3 Pages
  • Musical Theatre and Utter Wonderful Masterpiece
    Power to the Peeple Urinetown was a complete and utter… wonderful masterpiece! I was so entertained the whole show. I’m a sucker for a good comedy. I loved every minute. I went home singing, “this is Urinetown”! It was a wonderfully written show as well as directed. It was as golden as urine. It was very difficult for me to pick my favorite actor. They were all really solid characters; all really well developed. My one I picked would have to be Bobby Strong. The play is just written for the...
    459 Words | 2 Pages
  • Analysis of music in the film Grease
    Grease (1978) music: Leonard Bernstein I think the effectiveness of a musical film in comparison to a film score in a non-musical largely depends on the target audience of the film, genre of film, and plot of the film. In musical films like Grease, Chicago, Les Miserables, West Side Story, and Mama Mia, the musical and choreographed aspects of film work with the plot in an effective manner. I feel like [romantic] comedies (eg. Mama Mia and Grease) and dramas (eg. Les Miserables and Chicago) are...
    1,392 Words | 4 Pages
  • All Musical film Essays

  • Stephen Sondheim - 803 Words
    Hilarious Injustice Stephen Sondheim’s musical version of Sweeney Todd and Mark Hollmann’s Urinetown share many characteristics, overlapping in some aspects of Aristotle’s six elements of drama, but also in terms of style and tone. Both have a similar dark comedic quality, which underscores more serious topics, be it revenge, corruption, or environmental abuse. These could be considered the themes of the plays—revenge in Sweeney Todd, environmental abuse in Urinetown, and corruption in both. The...
    803 Words | 3 Pages
  • Hollywood Beyond Spring 2015
    '... Music becomes the signifier par excellence of the value of the couple and of courtship' (Altman, The American Film Musical, 1989:109). Discuss the relationship between song, dance, and romance in TWO musicals. In this essay, intend to discuss how romance and the feeling of excitement and mystery associated with love are achieved through the Hollywood musical conventions of song and dance. I will examine elements of both Singin' in the Rain (1952) and Swing Time (1936) to prove that...
    3,328 Words | 9 Pages
  • Mamma Mia Paper - 2256 Words
    The film Mamma Mia! (Lloyd, 2008) is based on the extremely popular and successful Broadway musical which opened in 1999 in London. Since then, this Broadway production has become a global phenomenon which has entertained countless audiences, and still holds on strong as one of the most enjoyed and accepted musicals of this generation (Shenton, 2009). And so it is assumed that the motion picture adaptation of Mamma Mia! would be just as popular; and it was, expanding into one of the...
    2,256 Words | 6 Pages
  • Glee Essay - 9330 Words
    Topic 2. ‘There is nothing ironic about show choir!’ - Rachel Cohen Is Rachel’s assessment of the musical performances on Glee correct? Discuss the interplay of melodrama, irony and intertextuality in Glee. Your essay should contain detailed analysis of at least two scenes from Glee’s 1st season. Your essay should also make reference to your core course readings on television and postmodernism. Due 14 September their true voice; and this one was, to me, ultimately about the series...
    9,330 Words | 23 Pages
  • An Analysis of Moulin Rouge - 2590 Words
    Moulin Rouge(2001) is an Oscar winning master piece from director Baz Luhrmann. It followed the success and recognition of Romeo + Juliet (1996) and Strictly Ballroom (1992). All three films were recognized for Luhrmann’s characteristic style. His films feature stylistic choices such as blue and red lighting, the use of rapid cuts and vibrant, period accurate costume. To analyze Luhrmann’s use of the four elements of the stylistic system, I will consider two specific scenes from the film, namely...
    2,590 Words | 7 Pages
  • Genre Analysis - 1369 Words
    Genre Analysis The musical film has always held a special place for me. From my time as a drama student in high school, my eyes have been opened to the amazing world of the musical and especially the musical film. The musical film is a film genre in which the characters sing songs that are integrated into the overall story. Since musicals first began in theaters, musical films usually contain similar elements. These elements often simulate that there is a live audience watching. In a sense,...
    1,369 Words | 4 Pages
  • Moulin Rouge - 783 Words
    'Truth, beauty, freedom, and most of all, love'. This is what Moulin Rouge is about. Good morning ladies and gentlemen. Moulin Rouge is the movie musical that merges fin-de-siecle decadence of the French Musical with modernised film directing skill which was done by a famous Australian director, Baz Luhrmann. This movie belongs to two genres, the romance and the musical. However, Baz Luhrmann subverted the typical conventions of the genre by re imaging historical trapping of the narrative which...
    783 Words | 3 Pages
  • Self Reflexive Aspects of Singing in the Rain
    Singin’ in the Rain (MGM, 1952) is an American musical comedy directed by Gene Kelly and Stanley Donen. The film comically emulates the transition from the production of silent movies to ‘talkies’ in Hollywood during the 1920s. The narrative follows a successful silent film star named Don Lockwood (Gene Kelly) and his glamorous blonde on screen partner Lina Lamont as they attempt to adapt The Duelling Cavalier a silent film, into a talking film. However, the shrill sound of Lamont’s voice cast...
    2,213 Words | 6 Pages
  • Pitch Perfect - 924 Words
    Pitch Perfect Pitch Perfect is a 2012 American musical comedy film directed by Jason Moore. The screenplay was written by Kay Cannon. The musical comedy features an ensemble cast consisting of Anna Kendrick, Skylar Astin, Rebel Wilson, Anna Camp, Brittany Snow, Ester Dean, Alexis Knapp, Hana Mae Lee, Ben Platt, Adam DeVine, with John Michael Higgins, and Elizabeth Banks. The plot follows an all-girl college a cappella group, The Barden Bellas, as they compete against another a cappella group...
    924 Words | 3 Pages
  • Essay on Singing in the Rain Movie
    Singing in the Rain Singing in the Rain is an American comedy musical film starring Gene Kelly, Debbie Reynolds, Donald O’Connor and Jean Hagen, and directed by Gene Kelly and Stanley Donen. It offers a comic depiction of Hollywood, and its transition from silent films to talking films. Throughout the movie, people could see many different elements that make the movie musical “Singing in the Rain” great. Because of the sound, especially the music, setting, costumes, make up, and the...
    1,046 Words | 3 Pages
  • Analysis of Singin in the Rain - 1099 Words
    Released in 1951, Singin in the Rain was one of the last films to be produced during the profitable golden age of the studio system. It evokes the typical characteristics of the popular MGM Hollywood musical by relying on superstar names and infectious dance numbers. However, Singin in the Rain incorporates an additional level of parody into its nostalgic plot that focuses on the disruptive shift from silent movies to "talkies." The film showcases classical Hollywood musical numbers supplemented...
    1,099 Words | 3 Pages
  • Singin in the Rain - 402 Words
    Jenna Zeringo Singin’ in the Rain In 1952 Gene Kelly and Stanley Donen directed MGM’s musical comedy “Singin’ in the Rain”. Fifty five years later in 2007 it ranked number five on the American Film Institute list of “List of Greatest Films”. It’s evocative to Americans and is generally considered the best Hollywood musical film; it was not a Broadway production until several years later. Gene Kelly not only directed the classic but he also choreographed and starred in it as Don Lockwood....
    402 Words | 1 Page
  • Bob Fosse - 295 Words
    Fosse started his career as a dancer and choreographer on Broadway and divided his time almost equally between directing for the stage and for films. All of Fosse's films are musicals (with the exception of Lenny) and it is within this genre that he made significant contributions. The directorial choices employed by Fosse stemmed, not surprisingly, from his style of dancing and choreography: a type of eccentric jazz that isolates and exaggerates human motion, breaking it up into small...
    295 Words | 1 Page
  • Legally Blonde Critique - 1405 Words
    An Acting Critique of Legally Blonde the Musical On Friday night, May 3rd at & p.m., my mother and I attended the opening night of Legally Blonde in the Buena P.A.C. I must begin by saying that I am slightly biased towards one of the actors who just so happens to be my sister, so the roles of Chutney, the girl who accidentally murdered her father, and a Delta Nu sister have never been played more perfectly in my eyes. While I found the play both amusing and enjoyable, there were some big...
    1,405 Words | 4 Pages
  • Singin' in the Rain Analysis
    Singin’ In the Rain Music Analysis Singin’ In The Rain (Kelly/Donan, 1952) is known to be one of best musicals ever made and one of the funniest movies of its time. This statistic can be attributed to the musical numbers that it incorporates. Singin’ in the Rain uses popular music of its time that people may already be familiar with. It works to seamlessly integrate them into a musical about the transition of film from silent to talkies. Additionally, the film is able to utilize them...
    742 Words | 2 Pages
  • Grease - 933 Words
    "Grease" is the word when it comes to my favorite musical past-time. But the question is, what was it about the rock and roll era in the 50s that influenced the writers of this stage musical turned movie? Also, how did this type of film affect the popular culture of the past and of today? That is the basis of this paper…. Grease began as a five-hour long amateur show presented in a Chicago trolley barn in the summer of 1971 and eventually made Broadway. The film version of "Grease" began...
    933 Words | 3 Pages
  • Depth Analysis of a Movie – "Chicago"
    Analyzing The Entire Film – "Chicago" (2002) Understanding movies comes from describing and analyzing the cinematic, theatrical, and literary elements that combine to create meaning. These steps create a basic understanding of the artistic and technical elements found in moviemaking. In addition, the major characteristics of different film genres and classic movies will be analyzed. The purpose of this paper is analyzing the Academy Award winning film Chicago. This paper will describe the...
    3,378 Words | 9 Pages
  • Little Shop of Horror - 1089 Words
    The Horror is Not Seeing This Movie Little Shop of Horror, the movie that made me fall in love with musicals. Before watching this movie I thought of musicals as plays on film, with long drawn out singing segments you struggled not to nap during. In my eyes musicals weren’t even on the same level as regular movies with all of its high tech effects, fast paced plots and trendy soundtracks. The movie Little Shop of Horrors changed my narrow minded way of thinking into dare I say, a movie musical...
    1,089 Words | 3 Pages
  • Masculinity in Classical Hollywood Cinema: the Male Body Image in Top Hat and the Best Years of Our Lives
    This essay will explore the ‘problem of masculinity’ and the way Classical Hollywood cinema invests and deals with the image of the male body, drawing from the analysis of examples from Top Hat (1935) and The Best Years of Our Lives (1946). Steve Neale argues that ‘it is very rare to find analyses that seek to specify in detail, in relation to particular films or groups of films, how heterosexual masculinity is inscribed and the mechanisms, pressures, and contradictions that inscription may...
    2,682 Words | 7 Pages
  • Pitch Perfect Movie Review
    “Pitch Perfect” has a pitch problem. Pitch Perfect is exactly what it says on the tin – Perfect. It is a 2012 musical comedy that was premiered in Los Angeles on September 24th, 2012. The film was directed by Jason Moore. It is based on Mickey Rapkin's non-fiction novel Pitch Perfect. The director of this movie has assembled a celebrity cast on the set, including Anna Kendrick, Rebel Wilson, Skylar Astin, Anna Camp, Brittany Snow, Ester Dean, Alexis Knapp, Ben Platt and Adam DeVine....
    377 Words | 2 Pages
  • An American in Paris Analysis Paper
    David C. Vales September 27, 2012 American Genre Film Film Analysis An American in Paris Vincente Minnelli “An American in Paris” is about an American man named Jerry Mulligan living in Paris with his friend Adam Cook. The two are in need of jobs. Jerry is an artist who comes across a wealthy woman named Milo Roberts, who takes interest, in not only his art work, but in Jerry himself. Through Milo, out of coincidence, Jerry sees and meets Lice Bouvier and his feelings spark for her,...
    1,302 Words | 3 Pages
  • Fred Astaire - 271 Words
    Fred Astaire Fred Astaire was born May 10, 1899 in Omaha, Nebraska. He was originally born Frederick Austerlitz. He and his sister took the name Astaire for their Vaudeville, which means multi-act, theater act when they were about 5 years old. Together, Fred and Adele appeared on Broadway and on the London stage. In 1932, they split when she married. He went on to achieve success on his own. In his second film, he was paired with Ginger Rogers for the first time. The Astaire-Rogers...
    271 Words | 1 Page
  • Meet Me in St, Louis and the Aspect of Sound
    The Aspect of Sound in Meet Me In St. Louis In 1904 Eugene Lauste successfully recorded sound onto a piece of photographic film. This invention was known as a "Sound Grate" the results where still far to crude to be used to public display. The cameras used to film "The Talkies" as they where known, had to be kept in enormous soundproof casing. This immediately hindered directors creativity and made movies such as Meet Me in St. Louis (1944) much more rigid. Because of the fascination with...
    1,039 Words | 4 Pages
  • Pitch Perfect Movie Critique
    Pitch Perfect Pitch Perfect is a 2012 American musical comedy film directed by Jason Moore. The screenplay was written by Kay Cannon. The musical comedy features an ensemble cast consisting of Anna Kendrick, Skylar Astin, Rebel Wilson, Anna Camp, Brittany Snow, Ester Dean, Alexis Knapp, Hana Mae Lee, Ben Platt, Adam DeVine, with John Michael Higgins, and Elizabeth Banks. The plot follows an all-girl college a cappella group, The Barden Bellas, as they compete against another a cappella group...
    1,185 Words | 3 Pages