Labour Party Essays & Research Papers

Best Labour Party Essays

  • Labour Party - 1567 Words
    To what extent was party policy the most important factor in the fluctuating fortunes of the Labour party 1900-45? The main aim for Labour at the start of the 20th century was to establish itself as a party that recognised and appealed to the working classes, as well as breaking down the two-party system in Britain with the addition of a new political force. The founding of the Labour Representation Committee can be attributed somewhat to Keir Hardie in the late 1800s, a movement that grew...
    1,567 Words | 4 Pages
  • Labour Party Is the Party of Devolution
    “The Labour Party is the party of devolution.” Is this a reasonable statement to make? Devolution is defined as “the transfer of power to a lower level, especially by central government to local or regional administrations” (oxforddictionaries.com). It can also be defined as “the transfer of power from a superior sovereign to a subordinate parliament or assembly.” (Tonge 2010). Within a devolved state, the sovereign power retains the technical power to suspend the devolved government. Since...
    1,033 Words | 3 Pages
  • Is the Labour Party a socialist organization?
    Is the Labour Party a socialist organization? In order to effectively answer the title question, this paper will delve into the roots of; firstly socialism then the Labour Party. After the core ideals have been discussed, this paper will highlight the comparisons which are evident between the concept of Socialism and the reality of the Labour Party. There are many forms of socialism, each differ in their ideals ranging from communism on the extreme left of the political spectrum to...
    2,149 Words | 7 Pages
  • Rise Of The Labour Party - 1179 Words
    “Explain how far the views of Source C differ from those in Source A in relation to the creation and development of the LRC/Labour Party.” Source A states that the creation of the LRC came from 70 organisation coming together to form a coalition in order to create “a new movement of protest in parliament.” It essentially says that the LRC was formed on the bases of several organisations all sharing the same idea and goal. Source C however does not mention this – it does not tell us that the LRC...
    1,179 Words | 3 Pages
  • All Labour Party Essays

  • Uk Labour Party - 771 Words
    a) Distinguish clearly between Old Labour and New Labour (5) "New Labour" was first termed as an alternative branding for the Labour Party, dating from a conference slogan first used by the Labour Party in 1994, which was later seen in a draft manifesto published by the party in 1996, called New Labour, New Life For Britain. It is also the turning point of Old Labour changed to New Labour with a symbolic of new aims/value of the Labour party which called New Clause 4, published at the 1994....
    771 Words | 2 Pages
  • British Labour Party Assign
    British Labour Party I would like to start by explaining The British Labour Party. The Labour Party is a centre-left political party in the United Kingdom, and one of the two main British political parties along with the Conservative Party. In 1997, Tony Blair led this political party and he tried to change the environmental policy. Blair criticized other governments for not doing enough to solve global climate change. In a 1997 visit to the United States, he made a comment on "great...
    428 Words | 2 Pages
  • Labour Party 1900s - 1463 Words
    Assess the view that in the period 1900-1914 the Labour party made significant progress towards establishing itself as an independent and influential political party (70 marks). The Labour Party, before the start of the war in 1914, had a total of 36 seats. In the general election of 1902, the party under the name LRC had one just two seats. This seems a remarkable feat in just over a decade. However some historians argue that Labour, in actual fact made little or no progress at all during...
    1,463 Words | 4 Pages
  • Between 1945 And 1951 The Labour Party Brought About Many Welfare
    Between 1945 and 1951 the Labour Party brought about many welfare reforms in an effort to positively impact the lives of British people. When they came into power Britain was seriously struggling both economically and structurally wise as well. This was due to the events in the Second World War which damaged many parts of British society and this created a feeling in the population that 'post-war would have to be better than pre-war'. The New Labour idea of creating a welfare state tried to...
    2,088 Words | 6 Pages
  • Let Us Face the Future: the Labour Party 1945 Manifesto
    Let Us Face the Future: The Labour Party 1945 Manifesto At the very end of World War 2, the British people is craving for a change in the economic and social policies of their country. In fact, the Great Depression and pre-war Conservative governments were very disappointing : Chamberlain's (from 1937 to 1940) and Churchill's (from 1940 to 1945) governments were practically only based on foreign policy (because of the war and the progressive degradation of the British Empire),...
    2,032 Words | 6 Pages
  • To What Extent Is the Labour Party Still Committed to Its Traditional Principles?
    The Labour party was founded on the principles of social democracy, which is a traditionally centre left ideology. It has been Britain’s major democratic socialist party since the 20th century and since then has been committed on basing its ideologies on advancement for the working class. Until the 1980’s, Labour had kept its principles consistent, but with the development of Michael Foot’s ‘loony left’ movement which was based largely around the irrational minority issues and racial problems....
    582 Words | 2 Pages
  • To What Extenet Has the Labour Party Abandoned Its Socialist Routes?
    To What Extent has the Labour Party abandoned its socialist routes? The definition of socialism is ‘An economic, social and political doctrine which expresses the struggle for the equal distribution of wealth by eliminating private property and the exploitative ruling class’. In some ways it could be said that New Labour hasn’t abandoned its socialist routes. For example, New Labour’s idea of a minimum wage very much bares a socialist style of view, as this is seen as fair, equal and is a...
    1,437 Words | 4 Pages
  • Conservative Party - 1689 Words
    Margaret Thatcher and the Conservatives In 1975, Margaret Thatcher became leader of the Conservative Party and began to steer it towards what many have dubbed ÔThatcherismÕ. Margaret Thatcher believed in radical change, individuality, and a strong Government that enforces the law, rather than interfering in the economy. She was also opposed to the welfare state. In many ways, her ideology was broadly similar to classical liberalism, and many theorists see her ideology as...
    1,689 Words | 5 Pages
  • Liberal Party - 3023 Words
    Transilvania University of Brasov Faculty of Foreign Languages and Literatures Department of English LIBERAL PARTY Supervisor : Student: Oana Pirnuta Rarinca Ramona-Roxana BRASOV, 2008 1. Sentence outline Politics is defined as a process by which the distribution of resources is decided between different groups in society. In Britain the party system...
    3,023 Words | 10 Pages
  • Labour Essay - 1177 Words
    To what extent where the Liberal Social Reforms of 1906-1914 a response to the challenge of the Labour party? Between 1906-1914, the Liberal Government introduced a series of social reforms. The reforms were the result of a combination of complex factors. The Liberal Government were worried by the growth in the popularity of the Labour Party. They were also responding to fears of Britain’s decline in “National Efficiently”- shown up in the Boer War. The social surveys of Booth and Rowntree...
    1,177 Words | 3 Pages
  • How Different Is Old Labour from New Labour
    How different is New Labour from Old Labour? The Labour Party was formed to represent the working class at a time when the franchise had not yet been extended to such groups. The party’s origins in the unions and socialists societies that meant it originally pursued an agenda centered on socialism, being more left wing on the political spectrum. However changes in the class and occupational structure of the nation since the 1960s, saw the party looking to broaden its appeal beyond this core...
    883 Words | 3 Pages
  • How Important Was the First World War in the Growth of the Labour Party in the Period from 1918 to 1924.
    Although the First World War played quite a large role in the growth of the labour party there were many other factors that contributed to their rise in popularity. Such as, the split of the coalition, the representation of the peoples act, and finally Clause IV. During the war the party was led by Arthur Henderson who was the first Labour MP to get into parliament and he played a great role in the War-time coalition. After a disagreement with Lloyd George in 1917, Henderson resigned from the...
    679 Words | 2 Pages
  • Explain the ideas and policies which link the modern Labour Party to socialism (10 marks)
    ‘Explain the ideas and policies which link the modern Labour Party to socialism’. (10 marks) Socialism is the economic system based on cooperation rather than competition of businesses which utilizes centralized planning and redistribution of wealth. Industry is state owned and therefore companies have government monopolies on them which results in no competition. Industries are redistributed though the state to achieve a fairer society. Traditional Labour values were indeed a form of...
    511 Words | 2 Pages
  • Labour Reforms 1945-1951
    How far did the post-war Labour Government meet the welfare needs of the British people between 1945-1951? When the war ended in 1945, the Labour Government, led by Clement Atlee, were faced with tackling numerous problems that existed in Britain. Their aim was to meet the welfare needs of the British people who, during the war, got used to support provided by the government. In 1942, a Civil Servant and an experienced worker on social welfare named William Beveridge constructed a report...
    1,061 Words | 3 Pages
  • Labour Reforms Revision Notes
    THE LABOUR GOVERNMENT 1945 – 51 COMMON QUESTIONS 1 To what extent did the Labour Reforms succeed in creating a modern Welfare State? How successfully did the Labour Government deal with Britain’s social problems after WW2? How significant an impact did the welfare reforms of the Labour Government 1945 – 1951 have on the lives of the British people? KEY FIGURES 1 Clement Attlee (Labour Prime Minister 1945 – 51) Hugh Dalton (Chancellor of the Exchequer) Aneurin Bevan (Health &...
    1,066 Words | 6 Pages
  • The Political Economic and Social Achievements of the First Majority Labour Party Were Unprecedented in Britain.
    One of the main parties in British politics is the labour party, it was established to represent the interests of workers, and traditionally supported by the trade unions. The party remained out of power until 1940. However, in the general election of 1945, it achieved a spectacular recovery. The period of 1945-1951 witnessed unprecedented political economic and social achievements of the first majority labour party in Britain. Labour, under Clement Attlee, started enacting the...
    366 Words | 1 Page
  • Politics Old and New Labour
    The Labour Party is a centre-left political party in the United Kingdom, and one of the two main British political parties along with the Conservative Party. Old labour were a socialist party, Old Labour, the traditional socialist representation of the labour party, presented many socialist views, these included the cradle-to-grave care, welfare and social justice. They also opposed views such as a free-market economy. Old Labour was the standing of the Labour Party since their founding in...
    906 Words | 3 Pages
  • Labours Victory 1945 - 815 Words
    How far was Labour's election victory in 1945 due to changes in social attitudes during the second world war? (24 marks) After the war had finished Labour enjoyed a political victory in 1945, they were now in charge of making the policies and choices that would best suite Britain at this rough time of economic depression. Their success was down to many different factors both during and after the war. factors such as the public wanting rid of the total war memories that are held within the...
    815 Words | 2 Pages
  • Political parties in Hong Kong
    Introduction Before doing some researches on this paper, there are some assumptions. The first assumption is that there is social stratification in the society. According to Chris Barker, it is a classification of groups based on shared socio-economic conditions.1 Based on the social stratification, there are various kinds of political parties started up in order to safeguard the interests of different levels. One of the applications is the formulation of the Legislative Council (LegCo)....
    3,196 Words | 21 Pages
  • Political Parties in Uk - 401 Words
    The UK's three major political parties are the Labour Party, the Conservative Party, and the Liberal Democrats, who won between them 616 out of the 646 seats available in the House of Commons at the 2005 general election. Most of the remaining seats were won by parties that only contest elections in one part of the UK such as the Scottish National Party (Scotland only), Plaid Cymru (Wales only), and the Democratic Unionist Party, Social Democratic and Labour Party, Ulster Unionist Party, and...
    401 Words | 1 Page
  • The Conservative Party in Britain - 1045 Words
    Conservative Party in Britain After analyzing some of the major policies of the parties of the UK, the one that I, as a college student, can identify with the most are those of the Conservative Party. I have always believed that education is the key to a successful nation, and lack of education results in numerous problems for a nation. Therefore, a party that enforces education and aims for the success of hardworking people is indeed, the one that represents my ideals (Roskin). At the same...
    1,045 Words | 3 Pages
  • Labour Welfare Reforms - 3415 Words
    How Successful were the Reforms of the Post War Labour Government 1945-51 in Solving the Social Problem that Faced Britain? By Nicole Anderson In May 1945, the coalition government that had steered Britain through the perilous days of the Second World War was finished. It was replaced by the Labour party who had the challenging task of rebuilding the country after the losses of the Second World War. The Labour government of 1945 made the first drastic steps towards the welfare state. William...
    3,415 Words | 8 Pages
  • The First Inter party government
    ` The First Inter Party Government (18 February 1948-13 June 1951) was the name given to a number of political parties including Fine Gael, The Labour Party, Clann na Poblachta, Clann na Talmhan, The National Labour Party and Independents. Before its establishment Fianna Fail had ruled uninterrupted since 1932 along side its founder Taoiseach Eamon de Valera. Coalition governments in Ireland had predominantly advanced as a result of the demise on the dominant position of Fianna Fail, which...
    2,210 Words | 6 Pages
  • What Are the Main Characteristics of New Labour?
    In answering this question it is first necessary to define what is meant by the term ‘New Labour.' With respect to the history of politics, ‘New Labour' is a fairly recent description of a change or shift in the Labour party ideology occurring within the last 12 years. It refers to a gradual shift of Labour from political left to a more conservative right wing approach to various issues and in terms of the political spectrum, Labour now occupy the middle-to-right area, rather than the...
    2,859 Words | 7 Pages
  • Do You Agree With The View That Labour
    Do you agree with the view that Labour Governments in the years 1945-51 established a society with a ‘significantly greater degree of social equality’ (Source 6, lines 31-32) Labour governments in the years 1945-51 aimed to establish a society with a ‘significantly greater degree of social equality’: Source 1 suggests this statement is correct, although conversely Source 2 suggests that overall Labour didn’t create a greater social equality. And finally source 3 implies that Labour created...
    1,482 Words | 4 Pages
  • Should labour enbrace a blue future
    Student number – 2217830 Should Labour embrace a blue future? In the 2010 general election, it was won by the conservative party who became the governing party of Britain with the help of the liberal democrats in the form of a coalition. This victory saw the labour party lose their first general election since 1997 and it the 2010 general election was seen as a very poor performance for the labour, this could be due to the fact that labour lost a vast amount of votes across all social...
    1,772 Words | 5 Pages
  • Political Parties, Party and Electoral Systems, and Voting Behavior in the Uk
    *Political Parties, Party and Electoral Systems*, and Voting Behavior in the UK *Political Parties and the *UK’s Party System Brief History: The Labour Party grew out of the trade union movement and socialist political parties of the 19th century, and continues to describe itself as a party of democratic socialism. Labour was the first political party in Great Britain to stand for the representation of the low-paid working class and it is the working class who are known as the Labour...
    882 Words | 3 Pages
  • Electoral System in Uk; Political Parties
    There are five types of elections in the United Kingdom: • General elections • Elections to devolved parliaments and assemblies • Elections to the European Parliament • Local elections and mayoral elections Elections are held on Election Day, which is conventionally a Thursday. General elections have fixed dates, and must be called within five years of the opening of parliament following the last election. Other elections are held on fixed and well as well dates...
    752 Words | 3 Pages
  • Compare and contrast the parties and the party systems of Britain and Russia with reference to comparative literature.
    Compare and contrast the parties and the party systems of Britain and Russia with reference to comparative literature. There are many similarities and differences between Britain and Russia. They both have an upper and a lower house in their parliaments and both have a Prime Minister, but in turn, only Russia has a written constitution while Britain’s constitution is unwritten. Though this essay focuses on one key aspect which Britain and Russia will be compared and contrasted on; political...
    2,168 Words | 6 Pages
  • The UK Political Parties Leadership Elections
    Compare and contrast the methods used by the three main parties to elect their leaders. In the organisation of the Conservative Party, constituency associations dominate the election of party leaders and the selection of local candidates while the Conservative Campaign Headquarters (CCHQ) leads financing, organisation of elections and drafting of policy. The leader of the parliamentary party forms policy in consultation with his cabinet and administration. This decentralised structure is...
    1,587 Words | 4 Pages
  • Labour weakness was the reason for conservative dominance
    Labour weakness was the most important reason for Conservative dominance from 1951 to 1964. How far do you agree? Between 1951 and 1964, the Conservative's time in power, the Labour party were providing ineffectual opposition. One of the reasons for this was their internal disputes over issues such as unilateralism. However, there were also more important reasons for Conservative dominance, such as the economy and growing prosperity in Britain, the property owning democracy and the greater...
    562 Words | 2 Pages
  • Why Did Labour Win the 1945 Election?
    Why did Labour win the 1945 election? There was a lack of a strong opposition. The liberal party was weak and not cohesive, the Conservatives complacent and tainted by memories of their failings during the 1930’s. They spent less on 1945 election and focused too much of their campaign on the dominant personality of Churchill instead of the popular reformist ministers such as Butler. Many voters associated Churchill with the nation as a whole and not with the Conservative Party or as only a...
    413 Words | 2 Pages
  • To what extent is the party of David Cameron Thatcherite?
    To what extent is the party of David Cameron Thatcherite? Thatcherism comprised a mixture of ideas and policies such as free markets, privatisation of industries, low taxation and little state involvement in people’s lives. Some may argue that the conservative party today under David Cameron has drifted into a different direction from Thatcherite policies, however others say that Thatcher still has a huge influence on the modern conservative party. One of Thatcher’s main policies was the...
    662 Words | 2 Pages
  • How successful were the Labour reforms of 1945
    How successful were the Labour Government reforms of 1945-51 in improving social and economic conditions? From 1945 to 1951, Clement Attlee was prime minister of the Labour Government. He aimed to improve the Social and Economic Conditions. The main aims to improve the social conditions were: to create a fairer society and improve the lives of ordinary people, build on the recommendations of the Beveridge Report, and slay the five giants (Want, Disease, Squalor, Ignorance, and Idleness). The...
    858 Words | 3 Pages
  • Political Parties No Longer Provide Ideological Choice: An Analysis
    Parties no longer provide ideological choice. Discuss. America’s major political parties have traditionally been regarded by popular vote as organizationally weak, decentralized, and ideologically confusing by comparison with the highly disciplined, ideological, class based, parties of the UK. However, the strength of this statement can only be based upon the legislation passed by different Political Parties, policies within manifesto’s, and decisions taken by party leaders, to show us that...
    848 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Conservative Party: Embracing the Philosophies of Conservatism and British Unionism
    Politics essay. The Conservative Party, officially the Conservative and Unionist Party and colloquially referred to as the Tory Party or the Tories, is a centre-right political party in the United Kingdom that states that it espouses the philosophies of conservatism and British unionism. As of 2013 it is the largest single party in the House of Commons with 303 MPs, governing in coalition with the Liberal Democrats, with David Cameron, the leader of the Conservative Party, as Prime Minister....
    348 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Uk Has a Multi Party System Rather Than a Two Party System. Discuss.
    The UK has a multi- party system rather than a two party system. Discuss. A political two party system is one where two parties have complete dominance over voting, in terms of seats and the general vote. The multi- party system however describes a system where more than two parties have the ability to win role as government. In this essay I will give a balanced argument on whether Britain is a two party, or multi- party system. Throughout a significant period in history, 1945-79, a two party...
    798 Words | 2 Pages
  • Why New Labour Succeeded in Introducing a New and Distinctive Set of Values
    To what extent and for what reasons did New Labour succeed in introducing a new and distinctive set of values to the conduct of Britain’s external relations between 1997 and 2010? Introduction As John Rentoul has observed in his biography of Tony Blair, “Prime Ministers always run their own foreign policy” (Rentoul, 2001: 420). This was certainly true of Tony Blair and New Labour. That itself is a reason why Britain’s external relations in the shape of New Labour’s foreign policy can only be...
    2,289 Words | 8 Pages
  • How Successful Were the Labour Governments of 1924 and of 1929-31?
    How successful were the Labour governments of 1924 and of 1929-31? The Labour government of 1924 displayed both positive and negative aspects. On the positive side, Labour had shown that it could actually run the country proved the widespread view that ‘Labour was unfit to govern’ was wrong and also it was proof that MacDonald and the Labour party could be trusted to run the country efficiently - the fears of a social upheaval on socialist lines. Education was a great area of...
    1,095 Words | 3 Pages
  • Why Was the Labour Party's Reign in 1924 so Short-Lived?
    The appointment of the first Labour government in January 1924 was widely regarded by contemporaries as an event of great political and social significance. The new Prime Minister, Ramsay MacDonald, lacked the governmental experience of his predecessors and had risen from obscure origins. Many on the political right expressed alarmist expectations of attacks on private property and established institutions. Among the more extreme predictions was a claim that women would be nationalised and free...
    855 Words | 3 Pages
  • Why Did the Labour Government Suffer an Unexpected Election Defeat in 1970?
    Why did the Labour government suffer an unexpected election defeat in 1970? In 1970, Harold Wilson's Labour Government lost the general election to Ted Heath's Conservatives. The Labour government had suffered economic problems (inherited from the previous Conservative government) throughout their time in office. Along with this; voters views of Wilson, problems with policy and awkward relations with the Trade Unions all contributed to the election defeat of 1970. Economically in the...
    1,017 Words | 3 Pages
  • Assess the Claim That the Labour Governments of 1924 and 1929 Were Unable to Achieve Anything
    Assess the Claim that the Labour Governments of 1924 and 1929-31 were unable to achieve anything In 1924, for the first time the Labour government was appointed, headed by leader Ramsay Macdonald. At this time, a topic of much political debate was trade, Conservatives adopting a protectionist policy contrasting with the Liberal and Labour views in favour of free trade, and as the strongest free trade party it was asked to take office. Their main aims in 1924 were to deal with the increase...
    922 Words | 3 Pages
  • Significant Failures and Successes of the Labour Government between 1964-70
    Do you agree with the view that, in the years 1964-70, the Labour Government's failures outweighed its successes? One of the most significant failures of the Labour government between the years 1964 and 1970 were the economic difficulties. Source 7 agrees with this very strongly as it states that they had “not got the economy right”. This could be highlighting Labour's National Plan launched by George Brown, the Minister of Economic Affairs at the time, in 1965. The Plan aimed to stimulate...
    1,798 Words | 5 Pages
  • Why The Conservative Party Remained In Power From 1951 To 1964
    Assess the reasons why the Conservative party remained in power from 1951 to 1964 Focus: evaluation of the reasons for the dominance of a political party during a specific period. Conservative leadership: Effective as 1) Churchill maintained consensus 2) Eden pre- Suez 3) Macmillan His skilful exploitation of television and the media His ruthlessness- Night of Long Knives But 1) Churchill also old 2) Eden made mistakes over Suez 3) Home was unsuitable Conservative policies: Focus on...
    1,309 Words | 4 Pages
  • A History of Social Policy: From the Beveridge Report to New Labour
    From 1960s on wards, the income figures revealed the existence of underclass. Before the war, unemployment was the key drive to poverty. Poverty harms the life chances of children. http://newsbbc.co.uk urban poverty and the structure of family has drawn large attention from researchers since mid-1960s and has helped to raise the level of national interest in the problems of central city crystallization of underclass. Migration has raised questions and generated new comings on contribution of...
    878 Words | 3 Pages
  • The main reason for Conservative dominance in the years 1951 to 1964 was Labour disunity.’
    The main reason for conservative dominance in the years 1951 to 1964 was labour disunity?” Access the validity of this view I agree with this statement as the labour party leaders were ageing. The labour leaders were from the pre-war era therefore it meant that they were not in touch with the population. This led to labour disunity throughout the years as it caused Attlee to retire, he found that he couldn’t understand what the young wanted. For the public they left their trust with the labour...
    1,460 Words | 4 Pages
  • New Labour in the UK: Era of Neo-Liberal Consensus on Economic and Social Policy
    Dhruva Murugasu Christ’s College Part I Economics “Under New Labour, Britain is witnessing a new era of neo-liberal consensus on economic and social policy.” Discuss The election of Tony Blair in 1997, it is commonly said, brought about a new era in Britain’s Labour party, with the party moving to the centre of the political spectrum and adopting very similar policies to the preceding Conservative government....
    3,513 Words | 10 Pages
  • Why were the Liberal Party motivated to introduce social reforms?
    Why were the Liberal Party motivated to introduce social reforms? (12 marks) Charles Booth and Seebohm Rowntree’s important social investigations proved more scientifically that poverty was a major issue in Britain. Evidence showed that 30% of the urban population could be classified as poor, and 10% of the British population were living below the poverty line. Britain had experienced a massive rise in population, with populations in areas such as London, Lancashire and the West...
    874 Words | 3 Pages
  • How Successful Was the Conservative Party Between 1918 and 1929
    How successful was the conservative party from 1918- 1928? As a party the Conservatives can be seen to have achieved considerable success between the years 1918-28. Before the war the party had lost 3 consecutive elections, whereas during the period 1918-28 they were in power for all but 10 months of those 10 years (First Labour Government January- October 1924). It can then be seen through their domination of power that they were very successful. However during the first 4 of those years,...
    1,385 Words | 4 Pages
  • To what extent do the UK’s major parties accept Thatcherite ideas and policies?
    Politics Essay To what extent do the UK’s major parties accept Thatcherite ideas and policies? Despite Margaret Thatcher being in office from May 1979 till November 1990, her policies can still be seen in effect today. The UK’s major parties, Labour and Conservatives, have taken into consideration her views and policies and adapted them to some extent. Some people can argue that the policies and ideas of Thatcher have “rubbed” off on the major parties; however others say these parties have...
    460 Words | 2 Pages
  • To What Extent Have The Parties In Coalition Remained Committed To Their Traditional Principles
    To what extent have the parties in coalition remained committed to their traditional principles? The formation of the Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition in 2010 has affected each party’s commitment to their traditional principles which would remain intact in a single-party government. However, the two parties have generally reached sensible compromises through peaceful negotiations to stay relatively attached to their traditional principles. The Conservative party has...
    959 Words | 3 Pages
  • Labour 'Changed the Face of Britain' Between the Years of 1945-51. Discuss
    Between 1945 and 1951 the Labour Government changed the face of Britain. Discuss. Between the years 1945 and 1951 the entire shape of Britain's economy, society and government changed. After World War 2, Britain was left in economic and financial depression. Countries such as Japan and Germany, left in utter ruin from the war, ironically, were able to rebuild their economies faster, and better than we could improve ours. It was felt that a great change was required in Britain, and perhaps it...
    944 Words | 3 Pages
  • To What Extent Had Labour Moved Away from Its Roots
    To what extent has the Labour party moved away from its traditional roots? The Labour party believed in more traditional principles post the 1997 reforms where Labour was rebranded as ‘‘New Labour’.’ Prior to this, the party communicated in a ‘left wing’ approach with socialist ideas. They believed in core values, where some were emphasised more than others. Equality was significant as there was expansion of the welfare state e.g. they introduced the ‘free’ health care system and taxation in...
    2,863 Words | 7 Pages
  • To what extent do the UK’s major parties accept Thatcherite ideas and policies?
    To what extent do the UK’s major parties accept Thatcherite ideas and policies? In 1975, Margaret Thatcher became leader of the Conservative Party and began the idea of Thatcherism. Margaret Thatcher believed in individuality, radical change and a strong Government that enforces the law, rather than interfering in the economy. Her ideas were seen as being very similar to classical liberalism. Under her rule, the Conservatives were no longer truly conservative, as conservatives are usually...
    429 Words | 2 Pages
  • 'Labour Lost the 1979 Uk General Election Due to the Strength of the Conservative Opposition'. Assess the Validity of This View. (45 Marks)
    The 3rd May 1979 saw the greatest parliamentary swing since the war, with the Conservative Party polling 43.9% of the vote; thereby winning 339 seats (up 62 since the last election). It is due to these figures, therefore, that historians such as Eric Evans believe that it was the strength of the Conservatives under their new, forward-thinking leader, Margaret Thatcher that led them to victory. However, when one looks at the context of the time itself, it seems apparent, as Marr sums up, that ‘it...
    996 Words | 3 Pages
  • “The main reason for Conservative dominance between the years 1951-1964 was Labour disunity” assess the validity of this view.
    “The main reason for Conservative dominance between the years 1951-1964 was Labour disunity” assess the validity of this view. Labour disunity was undoubtedly significant and contributed hugely to the Conservative party’s ability to dominate politically throughout this period. However, it would be wrong to argue that divisions within the Labour party are alone responsible for this. Other reasons include poor Labour leadership, the strength of the Conservatives and affluence between the years...
    2,080 Words | 6 Pages
  • “It Was Sheer Good Fortune That the Conservative Party Were Returned to Office in May 1955.” Discuss.
    “It was sheer good fortune that the Conservative Party were returned to office in May 1955.” Discuss. In the May 1955 General Election, the Conservatives won 344 seats, winning with an overall majority of 58; with Labour winning 277 and 3.9% of votes were for Liberal and Others. It can be argued that the Conservatives were returned to office in 1955 due sheer good fortune. However, we must explore the other options as to why the Tory party won, particularly how the Conservative party looked...
    724 Words | 2 Pages
  • How Successful Was Edward Heath as Leader of the Conservative Party Between 1965 and 1974?
    How successful was Edward Heath as leader of the Conservative Party between 1965 and 1974? Edward Heath led the conservative party through a difficult and revolutionary period in British politics from the years 1965 to 1974, punctuated by the joining of the ECC in 1973, prolonged damaging strikes, high levels of inflation, and many monumental U-turns through the period of his office. The concept of change is most notably seen right from the offset of his leadership as he was the first...
    1,539 Words | 4 Pages
  • “the Success of the Conservative Party 1918-1964 Was Due to the Appeal of Its Leaders.” to What Extent Do You Agree?
    The success of the Conservative Party 1918-1964 was due to the appeal of its leaders.” To what extent do you agree? To assess the appeal of the Conservative leaders, it is first necessary to define appeal. Appeal is the extent to which the image and personality of the leader appeals to the needs of the electorate at the time. Whilst appealing leaders such as Winston Churchill were successful in leadership, others such as Antony Eden who was arguably the most appealing were not as successful so...
    1,084 Words | 3 Pages
  • “The conservatives won in 1951 because of Sheer luck, they weren’t even the most popular party” Assess the validity of this view
    After the election of 1945 Labour began insurmountable changes to Britain as a whole. This included the introduction of the welfare state aswell as the eradication of ‘Beveridge’s 5 evils’, though many people would never look at the big picture in terms of labours influence due to the legacy of the wartime coalition being that of victory and, to an extent, excitement during wartime compared to the underwhelming state of peace. These feelings overshadowed the necessary actions of labour during...
    467 Words | 2 Pages
  • ‘The main reason for conservative dominance in the years 1951 to 1964 was labour disunity’ Assess the validity of this view.
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  • Mor and Nan in "Sandcastle" - 1791 Words
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  • James Ramsay Macdonlad - 3550 Words
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  • Explain why the Cpnservatives won the General Election of 1959
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