Jainism Essays & Research Papers

Best Jainism Essays

  • Jainism - 288 Words
    Jainism is a religion that involves a deep obligation to non-violence and being a devoted vegetarian. It also involved a deep respect for life and reverence for the purity and holiness of life. Devoted Jains believe that injury and pain to living creatures and nature are forbidden as it hinders their goal to liberation. Jains believe that the universe is never ending and that karma binds us to this universe. Karma are obstacles that stand in the way of spiritual liberation; commodities such as...
    288 Words | 1 Page
  • Jainism - 1367 Words
    Jainism, also known as Jain Dharma, is a religion that many people in the world don't know about but is practiced by about 9 million people worldwide. With the roots of the religion coming from pre-historic India, Jainism is a dharmic religion. There is not an exact definition for the word dharma, it has several different meanings. It is used in most of the philosophies or religions originating in India, like Hinduism and Buddhism. Jainism is a very strict and intricate religion and its...
    1,367 Words | 4 Pages
  • Jainism and Science - 1470 Words
    JAINISM AND SCIENCE Submitted To: Piya Mukherjee Faculty, SIMSR Submitted By: Saurabh Sheth PGDM-A (Roll no: 53) To maintain the importance of the concepts, many words used in the article are of ‘Prakrut’ Language. Concept of Jainism Jainism is the religion professed by the Jains, so called because they follow the path practiced and preached by the Tirthankars or Jinas. It is a religion of soul. This concept or belief is called theism. This self-belief is the most important...
    1,470 Words | 5 Pages
  • Jainism Essay - 1187 Words
    The religion of Jainism has many components that are said to be very similar with certain parts of Hinduism as well as Buddhism. The Jain religion is most popular in India where it was first found. There are millions of Jain people around the world. Jainism first started in ancient East India. The success of this religion all comes down to the 24 Jinas. Jinas are those who overcome or conqueror. The first Jina is believed to have been a giant around 8.4 million years ago (Robinson, 2010). The...
    1,187 Words | 4 Pages
  • All Jainism Essays

  • Buddhism & Jainism - 559 Words
    Buddhism & Jainism When Buddhism and Jainism were developing, no rivalry seemed to have existed between them because both religions believed in a similar philosophy of life. However, they differed on some views such as salvation and soul and this led to their separate ways. Similarities Between Buddhism And Jainism On God • Buddhism : The original Buddhist doctrine does not have any godly figures, though the later Buddhist sects introduced some Godly figures. The Buddhists believe that...
    559 Words | 3 Pages
  • Buddhism and Jainism - 1001 Words
    Buddhism separates itself from the Jain tradition by teaching an alternative to "extreme asceticism". Buddhist scriptures record that during Prince Siddhartha's ascetic life (before the great enlightenment) he undertook many fasts, penances and austerities, the descriptions of which are elsewhere found only in the Jain tradition (for example, the penance by five fires, plucking of hair, and the consumption of food using only one's cupped hands). Ultimately, the Buddha abandoned reliance upon...
    1,001 Words | 3 Pages
  • Jainism and Buddhism - 756 Words
    Jainism and Buddhism Both Jainism and Buddhism start in the 6th century BC, and they have similar backgrounds. The founders of these religions have similar stories. Jainism was founded by a man named Vardhamana, who was born into a wealthy, powerful family. When he was 30, he left his wealth behind and spent 12 years living a disciplined lifestyle and searched for the truth. He gave up all of his possessions, which included even his clothing, and eventually found what he was looking...
    756 Words | 2 Pages
  • jainism and shintoism - 1005 Words
    JAINISM JAIN Religion one of the oldest religion in the world does not believe in worshipping an individual It worship real quantities of a soul who attained state of “Jin” One who has faith in preachings of ‘Jin’ and who practices it is called “Jain” LORD MAHAVIR Popularly known as ‘Shraman Bhaguman’ Regarded as the founder of Jainism He, the founder , being the last of 24 Thirthankars(flourished drom 599-527 B.C.) He made it Jain Religion JAIN PHILOSOPHY Jain system like the...
    1,005 Words | 4 Pages
  • Comparisons and Contrast of Jainism and Daoism
    Comparisons and Contrast… 1 Comparisons and Contrast of Jainism and Daoism World Religions REL 212 Professor Elizabeth Jarnagin Comparisons and Contrast… 2 Both Jainism and Daoism (Taoism) have ancient roots going back a few thousand years. Statues and yogic seals found in the Indus Valley show that Jainism was practiced by civilizations as far back as around 2500 BCE, while Daoism appears to have originated around 2000 years ago. Although Jainism is older by...
    585 Words | 2 Pages
  • Concept of Substance in Jainism - 711 Words
    JAINA VIEW OF SUBSTANCE According to the Jaina’s substance is defined as the substratum of qualities and modes. It is divided into two broad categories namely astikaya (extended) and anastikaya (non-extended). Time or Kal is the anastikaya dravya. The astikaya dravyas are subdivided into two namely- jiva and ajiva. There are again four ajivas namely- dharma, adharma, akash and pudgala. Together they are called the pancastikaya. Consciousness is the essence or the essential characteristics...
    711 Words | 2 Pages
  • Buddhism vs Jainism - 596 Words
    There are great differences as well as similarities when comparing Buddhism and Jainism. The major difference that stands out to me would the doctrines of these religions. Mahavira and Buddha parted ways over doctrine differences. Mahavira and Buddha were powerful and charismatic in the eyes of society. They both obtained the amazing skill to convince and influence which are extremely important in start-up religions. Naturally, these two religions often disagreed over finer aspects of their...
    596 Words | 2 Pages
  • Religion: Beliefs Jainism Sikhism
    University of Phoenix Material Rajdeep Grewal Jainism vs. Sikhism Part I Read the assigned chapters for the week and complete the following table. Be as specific as possible when identifying practices, beliefs, rituals, and historical elements. Cite sources in APA formatting. Sikhism as a religion believes in the followings: Core Beliefs Jainism Sikhism 1. Every living being has a soul 1. Sikhism believes in One GOD. 2. Every soul is potentially divine, with innate...
    629 Words | 3 Pages
  • Comparison Between Buddhism and Jainism
    The religions of Jainism and Buddhism follow very similar paths but do have contrasting beliefs that makes them both very unique. The key founders of Jainism and Buddhism, Mahavira and Guatama, were contemporaries that came from the same social class. Their backgrounds and so similar which may explain with the religions share similar doctrines. Through researching their teachings and beliefs I will draw out the similarities as well as the distinctions that comprise Buddhism and Jainism....
    505 Words | 2 Pages
  • Jainism and Sikhism: A Comparison
    Both Jainism and Sikhism have arisen as alternatives to Hinduism within India. As Molloy highlights, they both share a belief in karma with Hinduism, but both reject the polytheistic and ritualistic elements of Hinduism. Despite these similarities, Jainism and Sikhism are different in their emphasis. The founder of Jainism was named Mahavira. He was the twenty fourth, in a succession of saints, called tirthankaras. Mahavira was born into an aristocratic family, and much of his life is...
    666 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Ethical Pillars of Jainism - 358 Words
    Essay #1: The Ethical Pillars of Jainism Jains believe that people are reborn again and again until they have freed themselves from samsara, which is the wheel of birth and death. The gradual process by which the souls learns to extricate itself from the lower self and its attachments to the material would involve purifying one’s ethical life until nothing remains but the purity is of jiva. Jains also believe that the universe is without beginning and that there is no creator or destroyer...
    358 Words | 1 Page
  • Jainism, Buddhism, and Hinduism
    Jainism, Buddhism, and Hinduism Jainism, Buddhism, and Hinduism, three of the world’s most dynamic and ancient religions developed in India around the same time. Though each borrowed from, evolved because of, or came into conflict with each other: Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism are more than religions, but cross-sections of an entire culture and time period. Jainism, Buddhism, and Hinduism have many a huge impact on eastern life as we know it. The interactions between humans and...
    958 Words | 3 Pages
  • rel133 r4 jainism sikhism
    University of Phoenix Material Jainism vs. Sikhism Part I Read the assigned chapters for the week and complete the following table. Be as specific as possible when identifying practices, beliefs, rituals, and historical elements. Cite sources in APA formatting. Core Beliefs Jainism Sikhism 1. Jainism, believing that reality and existence are eternal, does not believe in a Creator force or entity (Molloy, 2013). 1. Sikhism believes in a strict Monotheism, and that all names and titles...
    1,046 Words | 4 Pages
  • rel133 r4 jainism sikhism
    University of Phoenix Material Jainism vs. Sikhism Part I Read the assigned chapters for the week and complete the following table. Be as specific as possible when identifying practices, beliefs, rituals, and historical elements. Cite sources in APA formatting. Core Beliefs Jainism Sikhism 1. Rejects belief in a Creator-God 1. devout monotheism 2. Sees the universe as natural forces in motion 2. Founder of Skhism was Nanak 3. Practices five ethical with emphasis on nonattachment...
    539 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Differences Between Hinduism and Jainism
    The Differences Between Hinduism and Jainism Jainism call their role models tirthankaras. Jainism believe 34 people had reached perfection and are their saints. There is no way to prove this, historically, but there was the twenty-third person, Parshva. Nataputta Vardham known as Mahavira, an honorary title given to him, was considered the most recent tirthankara. Outsiders believe him to be the founder of Jainism. The meaning of Mahavira is “hero” or “great man.” Vardham left...
    424 Words | 2 Pages
  • Four Yogic Paths and Jainism
    University of Phoenix Material Four Yogic Paths and Jainism Worksheet Complete the table by comparing the forms of Hinduism and contrasting them with Jainism. | Jnana Yoga | Karma Yoga | Bhakti Yoga | Raja Yoga | Jainism | Explain the Meaning of the Name | knowledge | action | Devotion | Self control and meditation | Non violence | Explain the Basic Concepts | enhancing the supreme and unique self favored by people who are intellectually oriented as its practices involve direct...
    536 Words | 2 Pages
  • Who Founded Jainism and Why
    Jainism was founded by Mahavira in the sixth century B.C. at the age of thirty when he set out on a religious quest. During Mahavira's thirteenth year of being on his quest he gained supreme knowledge and from then on he preached about Jainism until his death thirty years later. Mahavira was the last of the twenty four teachers which were also called Jina which means "conqueror" of the woes of existence. Mahavira was born into the warrior class of India and when he set out on his quest it is...
    254 Words | 1 Page
  • enlightenment in hinduism jainism and buddhism
     neutral Karma is similary in Hinduism and Jainism in that the laws of cause and effect can be used for ones benefit in the afterlife. It is different in the two religions in that in Hinduism, karma is dependant on the will of a God, and in Jainism it is dependant on the individual. This is significant because in both Jainism and Hinduism, karma has an effect on every aspect of a person life both directly and indirectly. The two religions apply karma to their lives in different ways, both...
    2,905 Words | 8 Pages
  • Four Yogic Paths and Jainism.
    University of Phoenix Material Four Yogic Paths and Jainism Worksheet comparing the forms of Hinduism and contrasting them with Jainism. | |Jnana Yoga |Karma Yoga |Bhakti Yoga |Raja Yoga |Jainism | | |Jnana Yoga or Yoga of |Karma Yoga or Yoga of |Yoga of Devotion |A Raja Yogi sees the...
    1,219 Words | 6 Pages
  • Week 2 Jainism Vs
     Jainism vs. Sikhism Worksheet Rebecca Viramontes REL 133 June 2, 2015 Rev Dr Dwight Cooper University of Phoenix Material Jainism vs. Sikhism Part I Read the assigned chapters for the week and complete the following table. Be as specific as possible when identifying practices, beliefs, rituals, and historical elements. Cite sources in APA formatting. Core Beliefs Jainism Sikhism 1. Ahimsa- nonviolence belief means extremely gentle or harmless. This is the core belief in Jainism....
    860 Words | 4 Pages
  • Jainism and Buddhism.. Differences - 1273 Words
    1) On Karma: Buddhism : Buddhism believes in the universality of Karma, which is a result of one's action. Karma is a process, a consequence of one's desire ridden actions that cling to the personality of a being as an impression of its past and determines its future. Good actions lead to good karma and bad actions to bad karma. One can address the problem of karma by following the teachings of the Buddha, the truths enshrined in the Dhamma and the code of conduct prescribed for the...
    1,273 Words | 5 Pages
  • Four Yogic Paths and Jainism
    University of Phoenix Material Four Yogic Paths and Jainism Worksheet Complete the table by comparing the forms of Hinduism and contrasting them with Jainism. | |Jnana Yoga |Karma Yoga |Bhakti Yoga |Raja Yoga |Jainism | | |God's grace. |Actions are fate, |Dedicated, devoted |Monarch or princely |Literally Jina means | | | |destiny....
    978 Words | 5 Pages
  • Hinduism vs. Jainism - 312 Words
    Hinduism vs. Jainism I am going to compare Hinduism with Jainism in terms of the question of achieving the good life. I believe that the most important similarity is that both traditions strive and want to reach Nirvana also known as Moksha and that the most important difference is that Hinduism believes there is four stages to Nirvana and Jainism believes there is eleven stages. I will show this by using the following evidence for my position. Hinduism and Jainism both have a life goal...
    312 Words | 1 Page
  • Beliefs Jainism Sikhism - 294 Words
    University of Phoenix Material Jainism vs. Sikhism Part I Read the assigned chapters for the week and complete the following table. Be as specific as possible when identifying practices, beliefs, rituals, and historical elements. Cite sources in APA formatting. Core Beliefs Jainism Sikhism 1. Ahimsa - principle of noninjury 1. Naam Japna - remembering god through meditation 2. Sathya - truth 2. Kirat Karo - earning a honest living 3. Asteya - non stealing 3. Vand...
    294 Words | 3 Pages
  • Idea of Karma in Jainism - 1330 Words
    The Idea of Karma in Jainism Jainism is the one of the oldest practiced religions in the world. “Jainism is an ancient religion from India that teaches that the way to liberation and bliss is to live lives of harmlessness and renunciation” ("Jainism: Karma")Limiting the use of natural resources of the land and following the three jewels or governing principals of the religion obtains the goals of this religion. There are another five governing principles called the five mahavratas. These are...
    1,330 Words | 4 Pages
  • Similarities and Differences Between Jainism and Buddhism
    Both Buddhism and Jainism. have many similarities and dissimilarities. As remarked be Monier Williams. "Buddhism and Jainism were not related to each other as parent or child but rather children of common parent, born at different intervals, though at about the same period of time and marked by distinct characteristics, though possession a strong family of resemblances". W.W. Hunter writes "Jainism is as much independent from other sects, specially from Buddhism as can be expected, from any...
    579 Words | 2 Pages
  • Rel133 R4 Jainism Sikhism 1
     Monica Perez Religion 133 Professor James Finch Week 2- Jainism vs. Sikhism University of Phoenix Material Jainism vs. Sikhism Part I Read the assigned chapters for the week and complete the following table. Be as specific as possible when identifying practices, beliefs, rituals, and historical elements. Cite sources in APA formatting. Core Beliefs Jainism Sikhism 1. Karma 1. Karma 2. Truth 2.Believes there is a creator 3.Celibacy 3. Earning an honest...
    537 Words | 3 Pages
  • Jianism - 784 Words
    Customs Normal fasting Fasting in mind as well as body It is not sufficient for a Jain simply to not eat when fasting. They must also stop wanting to eat. If they continue to desire food the fast is pointless. Types of fast There are several types of fasting: * Complete fasting: giving up food and water completely for a period * Partial fasting: eating less than you need to avoid hunger * Vruti Sankshepa: limiting the number of items of food eaten * Rasa Parityaga: giving...
    784 Words | 4 Pages
  • Culture in India - 754 Words
    The term culture refers to a state of intellectual development or manners. The social and political forces that influence the growth of a human being is defined as culture. Indian culture is rich and diverse and as a result unique in its very own way. The South, North, and Northeast have their own distinct cultures and almost every state has carved out its own cultural niche. There is hardly any culture in the world that is as varied and unique as India. India is a vast country, having variety...
    754 Words | 3 Pages
  • Jainism’s Influence on Indian Thinking and Other Religions
    Jainism’s Influence on Indian Thinking and Other Religions Jainism was a religion that promoted non-violence and asceticism as a way of salvation, and it had created a significant impact towards Hindu thinking since the decline of the Vedic era in the sixth century BCE. The religion was formed as a rejection towards the formalized traditions of Hinduism such as discrimination between castes and animal sacrifices. Even though the rise of Jainism lasted for a short period of time, its...
    1,602 Words | 5 Pages
  • Time Management - 1655 Words
    It is a fact known to us all that with every minute of our life that passes, we are all moving nearer and nearer to death. Despite this, only a few persons think over this fact and make good use of this best opportune time with a view to truly achieving truth and divine bliss. TIME DEVOURS ALL: Time moves on continuously. Nobody has the ability in this universe to stop it. There are now deep oceans where there were high mountains....
    1,655 Words | 6 Pages
  • Assignment 1 REL 212
    Strayer Nuiversity The religions I selected are Buddhism and Jainism 1. Buddhism Geographical Origins of Buddhism Buddhism originated in India during the sixth century B.C.E., and its founding figure, Buddha, was a contemporary of Confucius in China and the early Greek philosophers, antedating Jesus by 500 years and Muhammad by a millennium (Candice Goucher, 1998). Cultural Origins of Buddhism: Buddhists believe that the Buddha (meaning “the awakened”) awakened to the laws of the universe,...
    883 Words | 3 Pages
  • Religious Life on Earth - 706 Words
    Religion is a particular response to dimensions of life considered sacred, as shaped by the institutionalized traditions. Religion is a complex and an indescribable subject that many have studied. Many scholars have posed questions of where religion has come from, why people believe in religion, why it is so important, and how can we understand it better. There might not be concrete answers to these questions. It is extremely difficult to describe what religion looks like, but in many cultures,...
    706 Words | 2 Pages
  • Eleven Vows of Gandhi - 3034 Words
    Any of us who has attended a prayer meeting at a Gandhian institute is likely to remember a chant beginning:-"Ahimsa Satya Asteya --." The two verses beginning with these words enumerate the eleven vows that Gandhiji considered almost mandatory for the inmates of his Ashram, in Sabarmati as well as in Sevagram. The eleven vows are: (1) Satya-Truth, (2) Ahimsa-Nonviolence, (3) Brahmacharya-Celibacy (4) Asteya-Non-stealing, (5) Aparigraha or Asangraha-Non-possession (6) Sharira-Shrama;...
    3,034 Words | 10 Pages
  • A Discussion on Jain Ethics - 1208 Words
     A Discussion on Jain Ethics 20/03/2013 Prompt- Discuss how the karma theory plays a role in determining the precepts of Jain ethics. Is the Jain ethic a theory of volunteerism? To what extent is it normative and to what extent does it have a practical connotation? The literal meaning of the Sanskrit word Karma is deeds, including thoughts and words. However, according to Jainism, Karmas are...
    1,208 Words | 4 Pages
  • ShortPaper1 - 1221 Words
     Jainism Kristi Moore History 111 Professor Brian Carey American Military University September 14, 2014 Describe and trace the invention and diffusion of one important philosophy or religion studied through week 3 of this class. How and why do you believe this philosophy or religion change as it entered a new area and interacted with a new people? Jainism There has been many religions and philosophies throughout history. Some are well-known; some of these well-known ones...
    1,221 Words | 4 Pages
  • Indian Culture - 2656 Words
    INDIAN CULTURE Have you ever thought of the amazing progress we, as human beings, have made in various spheres of life, be it language, literature, art and architecture, science or religion? Have you ever wondered how all this has been possible? This happened because, we did not have to make a fresh beginning each time, but were able to make use of and build on the work of past generations. You have never had to bother about having to make your own script or creating a new language system...
    2,656 Words | 7 Pages
  • Palitana - 507 Words
    Shree Satrunjay Mahatirth, Palitana, Gujarat The Satrunjay Mahatirth, Palitana temples are considered the most sacred pilgrimage place (tirtha) by the Jain community. There are more than1300 temples located on the Shatrunjaya hills, exquisitely carved in marble. The main temple on top of the hill, is dedicated to 1st tirthankar lord Adinath (Rishabdeva). Picture - The Jain temples of Mount Shatrunjaya, at Palitana Picture -Ariel View of the Jain temples and the mountain Shatrunjaya...
    507 Words | 2 Pages
  • Classical India and China - 1106 Words
    Writing Assignment #2 INSTRUCTIONS: 1. Read question and readings listed. 2. Complete outline before coming to class. 3. You will write your essay in class. Q: Judging by the cultural standards of classical periods in China and India, were women better off in classical India or classical China? Background information: See attached reading and p. 50-57 in Stearns reader. OUTLINE I. Introduction A. Thesis B. Overview of position II. Position: Hint: India...
    1,106 Words | 4 Pages
  • Rabindranath Tagore's freedom ideology
    Freedom Tagore was a lover of human freedom. Influenced by the western liberalism, Tagore opined that freedom of a nation will provide ample scope to its citizens to express their view openly. His idea on freedom contained the following things. Enlightenment of soul through self-realization: Freedom will provide opportunity to attain enlightenment of soul. It is only because by pursuing a goal in an atmosphere of freedom, one will get scope to realize one's self. That self-realization will...
    575 Words | 2 Pages
  • Khajuraho - 432 Words
    Once a great chandela capital, Khajuraho is now a quiet village. The town of exotic temples, Khajuraho is one of India's major honeymoon attractions. They are India's unique gift to the world, representing a melody to life,which encompasses all emotions ranging from love, to joy. Life, in every form and mood, has been captured in stone, testifying not only to the craftsman's artistry but also to the extraordinary breadth of vision of the Chandela kings. What to see The architecture of the...
    432 Words | 2 Pages
  • . In what ways is the role of asceticism in Jain religious practice distinct from other religions in early South Asia?
    religions in early South Asia? Tapas, or asceticism, which is how I will refer to it throughout this essay, is the practice of leading an austere lifestyle. Ascetics first renounce all their worldly goods, including family and possessions and instead live a life of wandering and hardship, for example, fasting, enduring physical hardships and gleaning or foraging for food. It is the belief of the ascetic that by doing this, they will achieve moksa, or liberation from the cycle of death...
    1,961 Words | 6 Pages
  • Comparative Theology Comparitive Paper
    LIBERATION Comparative Analysis Paper #1 Liberation in Christian and Jain Philosophy Deekshitha Divyendar Professor Timothy Helton...
    1,196 Words | 4 Pages
  • Jain Rituals - 5489 Words
    Hansa and Vinod Sutaria Cleveland, OH JAIN RITUALS AND CEREMONIES Introduction..................................................................................................................... 2 Six Essentials: ................................................................................................................. 2 1. Samayik: ............................................................................................................. 2 2. Chaturvimsati:...
    5,489 Words | 16 Pages
  • National intergation - 529 Words
    National intergation ndia is a country of varied ethnic groups, communities, cultures and tongues. Economic independence, culture, language and territorial integration are the ties of a nation. There is a feeling of oneness, unity and commonness in it. There has been political disunity, and rise and fall of various empires. Different languages are spoken here. People have different food habits. Different religions are propagated and professed here. But Indian culture and customs have united...
    529 Words | 2 Pages
  • Cultural Analysis of India - 600 Words
    Brief discussion of India’s history India’s ancient civilization reveals marvelous facts about its heritage. It indicates as to how kingdoms ruled and how people went about life in a logical way. Dance and rituals were always a part of Indian culture and this was the chief mode of entertainment. It is a land of aspirations, achievements and self reliance. Since medieval times, their chief occupation was agriculture which shows how they rely on their own occupation to produce their means of...
    600 Words | 2 Pages
  • Ahimsa Essay - 414 Words
    Ahimsa is a belief that is strongly practiced by the followers of Buddhism, Hinduism, or Jain Tradition. It is simply the principle of nonviolence towards all living things due to the belief that all living things have a soul. At first glance this seems like an easy principle to follow, that is, until you look deeper into it. The simple definition of Ahimsa mentions nonviolence towards all living things; this includes animals and bugs both directly and indirectly. When practicing Ahimsa you are...
    414 Words | 1 Page
  • Icomography Jain Yakshas - 3301 Words
    Iconography Final Assignment Yakshas in Jainism Introduction to Jainism Jainism is propounded by the Tirthankaras. There have been 24 Tirthankaras in the Jain religion. Tirthankaras are free from the worldly sorrows, worries, pain and suffering. The first Thirthankara was Rishabnath, the last one was Mahavira (599-527 B.C.). Jainism does not have one single founder but a path to purity and the right way to achieve moksha has been taught by all the Tirthankaras. A Thirthankar is not an...
    3,301 Words | 9 Pages
  • A Comparison Between Janism and Buddhism
    A COMPARISON OF JAINISM AND BUDDHISM 3 A Comparison of Jainism and Buddhism and an Explanation of their Spiritual Beliefs and Spiritual Practices During my research of these two very interesting religions that derived from Hinduism, I examined the Encyclopedia Britannica whose contributors were many. For Jainism, Dundas (2013),Shah (2013), and Strohl (2013). Their information was very helpful when I write about its...
    2,506 Words | 7 Pages
  • Importance of Ahimsa - 646 Words
    The Importance of Ahimsa Hinduism Essay Today’s world is an improvement from that of the past; however, the one aspect lacking is peace. Without peace, the world is an aggressive place where people have little or no respect for one another. The solution to this is the practice of nonviolence. Through this practice, society will have the ability to learn the importance of peacefulness and the value of their peers. As a result, society should learn the value of Ahimsa through the actions of...
    646 Words | 2 Pages
  • Indian Culture - 276 Words
    INDIAN CULTURE The culture of India refers to the way of life of the people of India. India's languages, religions, dance, music, architecture, food, and customs differ from place to place within the country. The Indian culture often labeled as an amalgamation of several cultures, spans across the Indian subcontinent and includes traditions that are several millennia old. Many elements of India's diverse cultures, such as Indian religions, yoga, and Indian cuisine, have had a profound impact...
    276 Words | 1 Page
  • Shrimad Rajchandra - 262 Words
    SHRIMAD RAJCHANDRA Shrimad Rajchandra was born in 1867 A.D. at Vavania, Saurashtra. His full name was Shri Raichandbhai Ravjibhai Mehta, and he belonged to a well-known merchant community. His father's name was Ravjibhai, and his mother's was Devabai. He was brought up in Jain religious traditions. In his short life span he had entertained all the thought-forms of powerful saints and philosophers. Though he was apparently young, he had a highly advanced Soul. For the first seven years,...
    262 Words | 1 Page
  • A Different History by Sujata Bhatt
    A Different History by Sujata Bhatt Wednesday November 09th 2011, 9:59 am Filed under: A Different History This poem is written by Sujata Bhatt who emigrated from India. This poem is about the British Colonization in India and importance of religions and culture in India. There are 2 seperated parts in the story where there is 2 different themes and different moods. Cultural difference, importance of language, lost identities(souls), Indian traditions are the most important themes. The...
    302 Words | 1 Page
  • National Integration - 276 Words
    National integration is the awareness of a common identity amongst the citizens of a country. It means that though we belong to different castes, religions and regions and speak different languages we recognize the fact that we are all one. This kind of integration is very important in the building of a strong and prosperous nation. Unity in Diversity Unity in our country does not mean the kind of oneness that comes from racial and cultural similarity. It is unity in spite of great...
    276 Words | 1 Page
  • Mahatma Gandhi Detailed Research Essay
    Mahatma Gandhi detailed research essay Mahatma Gandhi was one of the most influential political leaders of his time. During his life Gandhi lead a life based on the Hindu faith, yet he encouraged all paths to God. Gandhi is honoured as the 'father' of India. He studied to become a lawyer at university and attempted to be a practice lawyer in India. His practice there was unsuccessful, however he joined an Indian firm in South Africa where he began to inspire change. When Gandhi reached...
    303 Words | 1 Page
  • Human and Right Thing - 839 Words
    Jainism The Jainism try their best in showing compassion for all living things, no matter how big or small. Doing so is definitely not a bad thing by any means. They do things differently, just as most of us do. Different isn’t always a bad thing. Not many of us do the same things. We usually do what we’ve been taught to think is good or the right thing. So if they want to establish hospitals for animals, even rats, then that’s not exactly harming anything. Of course many of us would...
    839 Words | 2 Pages
  • Six Avasyakas - 1243 Words
    It is evident that the shape in which the ethical pres- criptions of Jainism have come down to us, is not a pure one, but many of them contain a distinctly formal element, such as the Samayika Vrata of Sravakas, -the Parihara Visuddhi Charitra of Sadhus, or the sub-divisions of PrayaS' chitta do, so that one might doubt whether they should not be counted as ritualistic rather than ethical rules. But the arrangement in which they are handed down, leaves no doubt that Jain...
    1,243 Words | 4 Pages
  • Changing Consumer Behaviour in India
    CHANGES IN CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR OF INDIA 1 Executive Summary:- Possibly the most challenging concept in the marketing is to deal with understanding the consumer behaviour. This research paper explains the changes occurred in consumer behaviour of India. The purpose of this research paper is to find out the factors that are affecting the consumer behaviour and what strategies can be formed to adopt those changes and achieve the long term growth and success. The synthesis of this research paper...
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  • Shatrunjay - Palitana - 444 Words
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