Ionizing radiation Essays & Research Papers

Best Ionizing radiation Essays

  • The Risks of Ionizing Radiation - 2374 Words
    There are various types of radiation surrounding us. As human beings, we are primarily exposed to natural forms of radiation such as radon, cosmic (space) radiation, and naturally occurring radioactive elements found in the Earth. We are also exposed to man-made radiation including medical radiation. Nearly half of the radiation in which the US population is exposed to comes from medical sources such as CT scans, x-rays, and nuclear medicine. In 1899, Ernest Rutherford discovered that the...
    2,374 Words | 6 Pages
  • Ionizing Radiation and Dose Skin Dose
    Radiation Protection & Radiobiology Notes Human Biology Human Response To Ionizing Radiation Early Effects of Radiation: When response occurs within minutes or days after exposure. Late Effects of Radiation: When response is not observed for many months or years after exposure. Effects of fetal irradiation: Death, malformation, malignancy, diminished growth. Composition of Human Body Cell Theory: 85% of the body is hydrogen and oxygen. Hydrogen: 60% Oxygen: 25.7% Carbon: 10.7%...
    1,560 Words | 6 Pages
  • Radiation - 618 Words
    radiation We can classify radiation into ionizing and non-ionizing radiation, according to the effects it produces on matter. Ionizing radiation includes cosmic rays, X rays and the radiation from radioactive materials. Non-ionizing radiation includes ultraviolet light, radiant heat, radio waves and microwaves.In medical practice ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) involve non-ionizing radiation. +light n heat radiation produced by the sun *ionizing radiation is produced by...
    618 Words | 3 Pages
  • Radiation - 693 Words
    Radioactivity computer research: Instructions and Questions [Note: Links to Bitesize websites may direct you to a ‘home’ page for Radiation and the Universe- click ‘Activity’ for Radioactive Substances and scroll through until you find the appropriate page] 1) Go to http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/science/aqa/radiation/radiocativerev1.shtml . What is an isotope? How many isotopes of hydrogen are there? An isotope is an atoms which are from the same element but have different...
    693 Words | 2 Pages
  • All Ionizing radiation Essays

  • Physics: Ionizing Radiation and Energy Electromagnetic Waves
    Project in Physics IV 1. One medical use of radioactivity is the treatment of cancer. Yes, radiation therapy is utilized for treatment of many types of cancers. Radiotherapy: a method to destroy cancer cells by irradiation with radioactive isotopes or X-rays. a. Explain briefly how radioactivity can cure some types of cancer. beta particles can cure skin cancer but not inside the body The main scooby dooby on this is that the biological...
    562 Words | 2 Pages
  • Radiation - 1071 Words
    Answer: Radiation has a profound effect on matter. Particularly in forms where it has high energy. There are basically two kinds of radiation, and they are electromagnetic energy and particulate radiation. Low energy electromagnetic radiation isn't generally hazardous, as long as the field strengths are low. You wouldn't want to stand in front of a radar antenna when it's radiating, but we are swept by low power electromagnet energy all the time. Those so-called radio waves are everywhere....
    1,071 Words | 3 Pages
  • Concepts of Radiation - 1434 Words
    Concepts of Radiation Radiation * Emission of energy from an atom and the transmission of this energy through space. * Energy propagated in a material medium or space. * Energy in transit. What are the types of radiation? * Radiation is of two general types in our environment. * They are called non-ionizing and ionizing. Ionization * the energy transferred to the electrons causes them to be pulled away or removed from an atom entirely. * The result is the...
    1,434 Words | 6 Pages
  • Electromagnetic Radiation - 7946 Words
    INTRODUCTION Radiation, flow of atomic and subatomic particles and of waves, such as those that characterize heat rays, light rays, and X rays. All matter is constantly bombarded with radiation of both types from cosmic and terrestrial sources. This article delineates the properties and behaviour of radiation and the matter with which it interacts and describes how energy is transferred from radiation to its surroundings. Considerable attention is devoted to the consequences of such an...
    7,946 Words | 22 Pages
  • Cancer and Radiation - 1257 Words
    In January 2012, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention released their Preliminary Data for the Leading Causes of Death in the United States. Their report showed that cancer is ranked at number two once again. As cancer rates remain high, it becomes increasingly important to understand what kinds of carcinogens, or cancer-causing agents, are around us, and how much they impact us. The known carcinogens that are well documented in terms of cancer death rates include smoking, alcohol...
    1,257 Words | 4 Pages
  • radiation therpy - 476 Words
     Dianelys Garcia I would like to do a research on Radiation Therapy because that is what I am going to study next semester. I want to know things like jobs opportunities, further education, job duties, salary, and side effects. The fact that I got accepted into this program make me so happy, and I thanks God for this opportunity. I think that I can help other thru this career. Help people to feel better and help to treat cancer. A health issue that affects many people. Many of us...
    476 Words | 2 Pages
  • Radiation Exposure - 1157 Words
    Radiation Exposure Do you know much radiation you are exposed to everyday? Many people are not aware of the radiation levels around them on a daily basis. I believe that exposure to radiation should be minimal. I think protection and prevention is vital. Being aware of the health risks and what can be done to protect yourself should be a well known piece of knowledge. If followed, this knowledge can help reduce radiation exposure levels. Exposure to radiation is higher today than it has...
    1,157 Words | 4 Pages
  • Radiation Safety Policy & Procedures
    RADIATION SAFETY POLICY AND PROCEDURES University Radiation Safety Committee and The Department of Environmental Health and Safety January 2004 UNIVERSITY RADIATION SAFETY COMMITTEE as at July 1, 2007 Dr. W.J. (Bill) Racz Ms. Susan Marlin Mr. J.E.D. (John) Bullock Mr. Dan Langham Ms. Anne Browne vacant Dr. H. F. (Gus) Shurvell Dr. A. (Aksel) Hallin Dr. J. (Jim) Lee *Chair Pharmacology & Toxicology Office of Research Services Environmental Health & Safety Environmental Health &...
    12,698 Words | 48 Pages
  • Biological Effect of Radiation - 922 Words
    EFFECTS OF RADIATION Background Radiation is all around us. It is naturally present in our environment and has been since the birth of this planet. Consequently, life has evolved in an environment which has significant levels of ionizing radiation. It comes from outer space (cosmic), the ground (terrestrial), and even from within our own bodies. It is present in the air we breathe, the food we eat, the water we drink, and in the construction materials used to build our homes. Certain foods...
    922 Words | 4 Pages
  • Acute Radiation Syndrome - 3123 Words
    Acute Radiation Syndrome Acute radiation syndrome which is also sometimes known as radiation sickness or radiation toxicity is an extremely serious illness that occurs when the entire body (or most of it) receives a high dose of penetrating radiation, a dose greater than 50 rads, in a very short period of time. Studies in animals and humans exposed to radiation have allowed researchers to describe acute radiation syndrome. The most replicative cells are the most sensitive to the acute...
    3,123 Words | 9 Pages
  • the history of radiation therapy machines
    Chapter 1 From X-Rays to Ion Beams: A Short History of Radiation Therapy James M. Slater Abstract Radiation therapy (RT) developed in several eras. Patients’ needs for more effective treatment guided the efforts. The development of ion beam therapy (IBT) can be seen as a corollary in this continuous endeavor to optimize disease control while minimizing normal-tissue damage. It could not have materialized, however, without the curiosity, ingenuity, and perseverance of researchers,...
    5,906 Words | 21 Pages
  • Radiation Facts and Health Effects
    Date: 10/20/14 Angineh A. Zohrabi GE150 Unit 5 Assignment 1: Radioactive Tracing Technology Radiation facts and health effects Radiation is a form of energy. It comes from man-made sources such as x-ray machines, from the sun and outer space, and from some radioactive materials such as uranium in soil. Radiation travels as rays, waves or energetic particles through air, water or solid materials. Radioactive materials are composed of atoms that are unstable. As unstable atoms become stable,...
    625 Words | 2 Pages
  • Testing the Effects of Radiation on Plants
    Abstract The purpose of this lab was to see if radiation has an effect on the cultivated radish seeds that we used. From the observed data that we collected, we were able to conclude that when seeds are exposed to radiation, it affects how they grow, if there is any growth at all. Introduction Radiation is an important environmental abiotic factor for plants, and one small section of the electromagnetic radiation spectrum, is called the Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR),...
    889 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Causes and Effects of Radiation - 4899 Words
    The Causes and Effects of Radiation A Research Paper Presented to Mr. Ronel Ramos Alcasarin St. Catherine Academy In Partial Fulfillment Of the Requirements for ENGLISH IV By: Hazel Dianne S. Cagalawan March 2013 The Research Paper attaches hereto, entitled The Cause and Effects of Radiation Prepared and Submitted by: Hazel Dianne S. Cagalawan In Partial fulfillment Of the Requirements in ENGLISH IV is hereby accepted: Mr. Ronel Ramos...
    4,899 Words | 15 Pages
  • Biological Effects of Radiation - 950 Words
    Biological Effect Mechanisms of Damage Injury to living tissue results from the transfer of energy to atoms and molecules in the cellular structure. Ionizing radiation causes atoms and molecules to become ionized or excited. These excitations and ionizations can: * Produce free radicals. * Break chemical bonds. * Produce new chemical bonds and cross-linkage between macromolecules. * Damage molecules that regulate vital cell processes (e.g. DNA, RNA, proteins). The cell can...
    950 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Effects of Radiation on Cancer - 335 Words
    The Effects of Radiation on Cancer There are both negative and positive effects of radiation on cancer. Scientists have discovered that radiation can lessen or increase the chance of obtaining cancer. Radio therapy is a treatment for cancer in which X-rays employ controlled exposure to radiation. Radiation also can save lives. The negative effects on humans are that if over exposed to it, it can cause migraines, seizures, and ultimately, death. Firstly, external beam radiation therapy used...
    335 Words | 1 Page
  • Uses of Radiation in Medical Industry
    Uses of Radiation in the Medical Industry Although scientists have only known about radiation since the 1890s, they have developed a wide variety of uses for this natural force. Today, to benefit humankind, radiation is used in medicine, academics, and industry, as well as for generating electricity. In addition, radiation has uses in such areas as agriculture, space exploration, law enforcement, geology and many others. However, in the medical industry, radiation is used for x-rays,...
    520 Words | 2 Pages
  • Negative Effects of Nuclear Radiation
    THE NEGATIVE PHYSICAL EFFECTS OF NUCLEAR RADIATION Page 1 Abstract Nuclear radiation has been a major problem since 1941 when the Second World War began. A major contribution to World War Two is the nuclear bomb, also known as the Atom bomb. Once the two bombs were dropped, the usually terminal Leukemia was derived throughout Japan. There are three types of radiation, Alpha, Beta, and Gamma radiation. In my study of radiation I discovered that radiation can damage many cells in your...
    931 Words | 3 Pages
  • Benefits and Hazard of Radiation - 2797 Words
    SUBMITTED BY: Teresita C. Ojastro SUBMITTED TO: Mrs. Pilar M. Macabinguil MALOH PROVINCIAL COMMUNITY HIGH SCHOOL DUMAGUETE CITY NEGROS ORIENTAL 6200 Mrs. Pilar M. Macabinguil ENGLISH IV Teacher MPCHS Madam: In partial fulfillment of the requirement in ENGLISH IV, I hereby present to you my term paper entitled “What is Radiation?” This term paper presents a research study on the importance about radiation and how...
    2,797 Words | 11 Pages
  • Radiation Protection in Medical Radiography
    Wendy Wiredu XRA 230 A. PERSONNEL PROTECTION * Primary X-Ray Beam * Emerges directly from the x-ray tube collimator. * It moves without deflection (toward a wall, door, viewing window, etc). * Primary radiation is also known as direct radiation. * Secondary Radiation (aka Scatter radiation & Leakage Radiaiton) * Scatter Radiation – results whenever a diagnostic x-ray beam passes through matter. * Compton interactions between the x-ray...
    1,809 Words | 7 Pages
  • Effects of Electromagnetic Radiation - 9872 Words
    TITLE: EFFECTS OF ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION ON HUMAN HEALTH. Table of Contents DECLARATION 2 APPROVAL 3 DEDICATION 4 ABSTRACT 7 LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS 7 CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION 9 1.1 Background information 9 1.2 STATEMENT OF THE PROBLEM 10 1.2.1 Current situation 10 1.2.2 Research to find out the effects of electromagnetic radiation on human health. 11 1.3 OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY 13 1.3.1 General objective 13...
    9,872 Words | 28 Pages
  • Guidant: Radiation Therapy - 2566 Words
    Case-Study Guidant 1.How attractive is the radiation therapy opportunity for Guidant? First we will determine the size of the market and its growth potential. Then we will assess the attractiveness of the market for radiation therapy in general using the concept of Porter's 5 forces. Furthermore we will connect this information with Guidant's specifics and its complementary assets to find out if this specific market is attractive for the company. Market size and growth potential The...
    2,566 Words | 8 Pages
  • Effects of Radiation on Corn - 2296 Words
     The Effect of Varying Dosages of Gamma Radiation on the Growth of Corn (Zea mays L.)1 Montalbo, Josephine M. A- 1L September 7, 2013 1 A scientific paper submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements in Genetics laboratory under Prof. Cheryl D. Agdaca, 1st semester, A.Y. 2013-2014. ABSTRACT Exposure of corn plants to ionizing radiation such as gamma radiation can induce mutation. The purpose of this study...
    2,296 Words | 9 Pages
  • Level of Awareness and Implementation of Radiation Protection
    CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION Background of the Study Protecting the patient from unnecessary radiation exposure include not only the Cardinal Principles of radiation protection, but also the behaviors of imaging personnel towards each patient. It is often asked, "Why do we need to discuss patient protection when it is the patient who is being imaged and therefore being exposed to radiation?" "And is not all radiation exposure made within safe limits so that patient protection is not really...
    7,278 Words | 26 Pages
  • Lab 1: Absorption of Nuclear Radiation
    PHY 114: General Physics Laboratory Lab 1: Absorption of Nuclear Radiation 09/04/13 Abstract Nuclear physics was practiced to find the value of tau. After 8 trials of using a G-M counter and 8 different mass thicknesses of polyethylene, a graph was formed and tau was calculated to be 0.1931 cm^2/g, an error of 3.57% from the accepted value of 0.2 cm^2/g. Experiment was also used as an intro to using basic lab equipment, computer programs and calculating errors. With many...
    822 Words | 5 Pages
  • Absorption of Nuclear Radiation (Lab 1)
    PHY 114: Absorption of Nuclear Radiation Abstract: The purpose of this experiment was to determine the mass thickness attenuation factor for beta rays when they pass through polyethylene sheets of varying thicknesses. This was done by using an apparatus that measured the seven different intensities and then taking these values, putting them through a number of calculations and finally generating a graph of ln(I_corr) versus the thickness of the polyethylene sheets. Once this...
    1,154 Words | 4 Pages
  • Medical Radiation Detection/Protection Market
    This report studies the global radiation protection (detection, monitoring, and safety) market for medical applications over the forecast period of 2012 to 2017. Radiation protection is the science of protecting the human population and environment from the harmful effects of ionizing radiation, such as electromagnetic and particulate radiations. The global radiation protection market, on the basis of industry, is classified into five segments, namely, medical, manufacturing, defense,...
    257 Words | 1 Page
  • The Effect of Different Levels of Radiation in Growth of Plants.
    ABSTRACT The effect of different levels of radiation was determined using four set-ups-10kR, 30kR, 50 kR, and the control (no radiation). The four set-ups were observed for nine weeks and growth (in cm), germination, and survival rate was measured. Results showed that at the right level of radiation level (10 kR), radiation have a positive effect on the plant growth and has the same germination and survival rate from the control set up. The 30 kR set up and 50 kR set up are relatively smaller...
    1,070 Words | 4 Pages
  • Effects of Radiation to the Growth and Development of Zea Mays
    Effect of Ionizing Radiation on the Germination, Growth and Development of Corn (Zea mays L.) Alexis A. Parco BIO30 Group 1 Sec. A-6L September 27, 2012 ABSTRACT Corn seeds pre-exposed to 10, 30, and 50 kiloRads (kR) of radiation were grown in plots for almost 7 weeks. Four different setups – 10kR, 30kR, 50kR and the control, each with 10 corn seeds initially planted – were observed three times a week (during Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays), and the height of each growing corn...
    1,760 Words | 6 Pages
  • The Effect of Radiation in Inducing Mutation on the Growth of Zea Mays
    The Effect of Radiation in Inducing Mutation On the Growth of Zea mays1 Milanie Joy S. Baradi BIO 30 Section S-1L October 10, 2011 ____________________ 1A scientific paper submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements in Biology 30 laboratory under Professor Neilyn O. Villa, 1st semester, 2011-2012. ABSTRACT To determine the effects of gamma radiation in inducing mutation on the growth of corn (Zea mays), an experiment using corn seeds...
    1,549 Words | 6 Pages
  • Effect of Gamma Rays Radiation on Growth of Corn
    APPENDIX Table 7.1. Mean heights (in cm) of Corn (Zea mays) plants irradiated with 50kr, 30kr, 10kr and no gamma rays. AGE (days) | Control | 10kr | 30kr | 50kr | 1 | 2.74 | 2.3 | 1.6 | 1.3 | 3 | 9.99 | 9.96 | 6.39 | 3.69 | 6 | 17.25 | 6.95 | 9.94 | 5.4 | 8 | 21.15 | 19.17 | 12.63 | 6.5 | 10 | 27 | 23.22 | 14.19 | 8.2 | 13 | 30.76 | 27.93 | 15.03 | 8.65 | 15 | 29.5 | 26.95 | 16.81 | 7.63 | 17 | 33.85 | 33.83 | 15.69 | 8.5 | 19 | 38.33 | 44.83 | 16.94 | 8.5 | 21 | 34.4 |...
    1,990 Words | 6 Pages
  • Effect of Radiation to Corn (Zea mays L.)
    ABSTRACT Mutation was induced via a physical agent, radiation. 4 levels of radiation—0 kr (control), 10 kr, 30 kr, and 50 kr—were used in seeds to determine the radiation effects on the growth of Zea mays. Using two duplicate set-ups, each, planted with 18 seeds per radiation, the differences in height were observed from January 29 to March 17 in a 1 to 2-day interval (Mondays-Wednesdays-Fridays). Results show that as radiation increases, the potential of plants to grow decreases—0 kr seeds...
    1,573 Words | 6 Pages
  • Atoms, Radiation, and Radiation Protection (Physics Textbook) - James E. Turner (Wiley-Vch 2007)
    James E. Turner Atoms, Radiation, and Radiation Protection 1807–2007 Knowledge for Generations Each generation has its unique needs and aspirations. When Charles Wiley first opened his small printing shop in lower Manhattan in 1807, it was a generation of boundless potential searching for an identity. And we were there, helping to define a new American literary tradition. Over half a century later, in the midst of the Second Industrial Revolution, it was a generation focused on building...
    192,460 Words | 974 Pages
  • Staff Nurse to Protect Their Self from Hazard of X- Radiation While They Are Working in Wards or in the Radiology Department
    Is there a need for pediatric staff nurse to protect their self from hazard of x- radiation while they are working in wards or in the Radiology Department? Introduction This research is concerned with x-radiation protection for the pediatric staff nurses while they are taken care for pediatric patient in Salmaniya Medical Complex wards and as well as in radiology department. The authors are trying to learn how the staff is exposed x-radiation exposure, what the risks are and what are the...
    2,408 Words | 7 Pages
  • The Radioprotective Potential of the Ashitaba Plant against X-ray Radiation using Micronucleus Test with East Asian Bullfrogs
    De La Salle Araneta University The Radioprotective Potential of the Ashitaba Plant against X-ray Radiation using Micronucleus Test with East Asian Bullfrogs In partial fulfillment in Zoology Lecture Anton Racela Nicko Macasaet Isabella Quinio Floro Alpuerto Julie Cañete Joshua Cuyugan Gabe Gonzalez Kervin Asignacion Joemel Borromeo DVM1A Mr. Daniel Gracilla Zoology Lecture Professor October 10, 2013 ABSTRACT Ashitaba...
    7,049 Words | 32 Pages
  • Impact of gamma rays on the germination and seedling parameters of Groundnut
    ASIAN J. EXP. BIOL. SCI. VOL 4 (1) 2013: 61-68 © Society of Applied Sciences ORIGINAL ARTICLE Impact of Gamma Rays on the Seed Germination and Seedling Parameters of Groundnut (Arachis Hypogaea L.) 1* 1 1 1 1 M. Aparna. , Anurag Chaturvedi , M. Sreedhar. , D. Pavan Kumar , 2 3 P. Venu-Babu and R. K. Singhal . Quality Control Laboratory, Acharya N.G. Ranga Agricultural University, Rajendranagar, Hyderabad- 500 030, A. P, India 2 Nuclear 3Agriculture and...
    3,013 Words | 26 Pages
  • Gamma Rays in Radiotherapy - 1227 Words
    Gamma Rays in Radiotherapy 8B Lae Eun Kim In this unit, we learned that there are 7 types of radiation of the electromagnetic spectrum – gamma rays, x-rays, ultraviolet, visible spectrum, infrared, microwaves and radio waves. With different wavelengths, they each have different properties and uses. Gamma rays are the radiation with the smallest wavelengths – 10-12m to 10-10m – and the most energy and the most danger of any wave in the electromagnetic spectrum. Radiotherapy, a treatment the...
    1,227 Words | 4 Pages
  • cancer - 385 Words
    Radiation therapy uses high-energy radiation to shrink tumors and kill cancer cells. X-rays, gamma rays, and charged particles are types of radiation used for cancer treatment. The radiation may be delivered by a machine outside the body called a linear accelerator to focus x-rays directly on the tumor or tumor bed (external-beam radiation therapy), or it may come from radioactive material placed in the body near cancer cells (internal radiation therapy, also called brachytherapy)....
    385 Words | 2 Pages
  • Radioactive Emissions - 318 Words
    INTRODUCTION Radioactive emissions are electromagnetic radiations which occur due to the spontaneous disintegration of unstable nuclei. Natural elements with atomic number greater than 83 and isotopes of some lighter elements are found to be radioactive. They are categorized as alpha, beta and gamma radiations. Alpha particles are positively charged helium-4 nuclei , beta particles are high energy-high speed electrons while gamma rays unlike alpha and beta radiation have no mass and charge...
    318 Words | 1 Page
  • The Half-Life of a Radioisotope - 774 Words
    The Half-Life of a Radioisotope CHM 152 Abstract: The half-life of an unknown radioactive isotope was investigated. The activity of the samples through use of a Geiger-Muller counter. The activity was measured for approximately five minutes per sample, and a half-life was calculated by the unknown. The results were calculated to indicate a half-life of 6.65 days of the unknown radioisotope. Introduction: The half-life of a radioisotope is defined as the amount of time necessary for...
    774 Words | 4 Pages
  • Application of Radiopharmaceuticals - 997 Words
     Applications of Radiopharmaceuticals Name: Lew Chien Ai Radiopharmaceuticals are formulations containing radioisotopes, which are use internally for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes. Radiopharmaceuticals have modernized the medical field by their ability to provide static as well as dynamic images of internal organs in a noninvasive manner as well as by offering efficacious therapy of certain diseases. Radioisotopes are...
    997 Words | 4 Pages
  • Soil Activity in Western Himalaya
    123 Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry An International Journal Dealing with All Aspects and Applications of Nuclear Chemistry ISSN 0236-5731 Volume 291 Number 3 J Radioanal Nucl Chem (2012) 291:769-776 DOI 10.1007/s10967-011-1349-7 Radiological assessment of natural and fallout radioactivity in the soil of Chamba and Dharamshala areas of Himachal Pradesh, India S. V. Bara, Vishal Arora, S. Chinnaesakki, S. J. Sartandel, B. S. Bajwa, R. M. Tripathi & V. D....
    4,025 Words | 13 Pages
  • Bio30 - 1653 Words
    ABSTRACT The effect of radiation to the production and growth of corn (Zea mays) w studied by irradiating the corn kernels with different doses (0, 10, 30, and 50 kilorad) of gamma rays. Ten kernels of corn was planted for each doses starting with the control one up to the 50 kilo rad. Each day it was observed, measured, and count the corn plants that grow and died. During the first day of observation, there are six corn plant that grow in the control, 10, and 30, and there is no plant that...
    1,653 Words | 5 Pages
  • The Use of X-Rays in Dentistry
    Matthew Johnston The use of X-Rays in Modern Dentistry Dentistry is increasingly becoming a major part of people lives in today’s society, being taken for granted and often little thought about. As technologies advance treatment becomes cheaper, quicker, and the outcome becomes more aesthetically pleasing and longer lasting. As braces, dentures, crowns, procedures and techniques change and improve at an alarming rate, one aspect has remained the same for a longer period of time. This is the...
    1,045 Words | 3 Pages
  • long - 3422 Words
    Radiological Weapons as Means of Attack Anthony H. Cordesman Radiological weapons are generally felt to be suitable largely for terror, political, and area denial purposes, rather than mass killings. Unlike nuclear weapons, they spread radioactive material contaminating personnel, equipment, facilities, and terrain. The radioactive material acts as a toxic chemical to which exposure eventually proves harmful or fatal. Radiation is energy that comes from a source and travels through some...
    3,422 Words | 10 Pages
  • Effect of Irradiation on the Growth and Germination of the Corn (Zea mays)
    Effect of Irradiation on the Growth and Germination of the Corn (Zea mays)¹ Mardocheo Yao Crispino S- 5L ¹A scientific paper submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements in Biology 30 (Principles Of Genetics) laboratory under Mr. Jickerson P. Lado, 1st sem., 2013-2014. ABSTRACT The effect of irradiation on the growth and germination of the corn was determined by planting ten seeds per treatment with varying doses. Four hills...
    1,899 Words | 11 Pages
  • The Dangers of Radio Isotopes - 917 Words
    Dangers of Radioisotopes: When radiation collides with molecules in living cells it can damage them. If the DNA in the nucleus of a cell is damaged, the cell may become cancerous. The cell then goes out of control, divides rapidly and causes serious health problems. Radiation warning symbol The greater the dose of radiation a cell gets, the greater the chance that the cell will become cancerous. However, very high doses of radiation can kill the cell completely. We use this property of...
    917 Words | 3 Pages
  • Nuclear Chemistry - 600 Words
    Nuclear Chemistry Imagine the majority of Earth being quarantined off and people having to live in specified areas to avoid harmful radiation that originated from nuclear energy/waste. The integration of nuclear energy/medicine is largely controversial among people. Every side to the argument has its benefits as well as its negative consequences. Nuclear energy should not be used in society because of the threat it poses to thousands of people. In contrast, nuclear medicine has positive aspects...
    600 Words | 2 Pages
  • Chemistry Question Paper - 1642 Words
    9.2.5 Chemistry past paper questions 2001 Question 16 (3 marks) Radioisotopes are used in industry, medicine and chemical analysis. For ONE of these fields, relate the use of a named radioisotope to its properties. Medicine – Iodine Ingested iodine concentrates in the thyroid gland and so iodine 131 can treat thyroid disorders (e.g. tumours) Iodine 131 has a half life of just over 8 days, emits beta particles and gamma rays as it decays. This half life is long enough for it to be transported...
    1,642 Words | 6 Pages
  • Project Report - 9191 Words
    Dissertation Project Report Title: “Evaluation of a natural product as radiation countermeasure agent.” Dissertation Submitted to Lovely Professional University, Punjab In partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of Bachelor of Technology (Hons.) Biotechnology By Rishabh Malik- 8th Semester May 2011 CERTIFICATE OF AUTHENTICITY This is to certify that the project report entitled “Evaluation of a natural product as radiation countermeasure agent.”, submitted in partial...
    9,191 Words | 35 Pages
  • Nuclear Medicine - 2609 Words
    Nuclear Medicine Nuclear medicine has been around for more than 50 years now and stems from the discovery of x-rays and artificial radioactivity. In 1946, nuclear medicine made a monumental breakthrough when radioactive iodine led to the complete disappearance of cancer in a patient’s thyroid. Nuclear medicine became widely used in the 1950’s to measure the function of the thyroid, to diagnose thyroid disease, and for the treatment of patients with hyperthyroidism. By the 1970’s nuclear...
    2,609 Words | 7 Pages
  • Food Irradiation - 1279 Words
    Food irradiation is a food safety technology that can eliminate disease-causing germs from foods. Like pasteurization of milk, and pressure-cooking of canned foods, treating food with ionizing radiation can kill bacteria that would otherwise cause food borne disease. The process can also control insects and parasites, reduce spoilage, and inhibit ripening and sprouting. (5) The effects of irradiation on the food and on animals and people eating irradiated food have been studied...
    1,279 Words | 4 Pages
  • Information on the radioisotope: Cobalt 60 used in medicine and in industry
    a) Identify a radioisotope that is used in medicine or industry and briefly outline its use Cobalt-60 is used in industrial radiography to inspect metal parts and welds for defects, in gamma sterilisation of equipment and in gauging. In the area of medicine, Cobalt-60 is used in cancer radiotherapy. b) Describe how the radioisotope is made. Radioactive cobalt-60 is produced in a process called activation, when materials in reactors, such as steel, are exposed to neutron radiation. Often...
    655 Words | 3 Pages
  • positive and negative aspect of technology
    The World of Technology/Two Sides on the Same Coin “It has become appallingly obvious that technology has exceeded our humanity,” (Einstein). This notion of technological advances, surpassing human capacity has impacted the way the world functions today. Technology has evolved into this great phenomenon that everyone uses. Whether that’s communicating with a family member, making purchases online, getting to and from school, or just simply killing boredom. It seems that technology has had a...
    845 Words | 3 Pages
  • Biology Radioisotopes - 290 Words
    Radioactive isotopes (radioisotopes) are isotopes which are atoms of the same element that are chemically identical but vary in the number of neutrons they contain. Radioactive isotopes can participate in reactions just like non radioactive elements. Autoradiography is a technique used to trace the movements of certain substances around plants. An example of this is carbon 14. Carbon 14, a radioactive isotope,is added to the carbon dioxide supply of the plant, to study the movement of...
    290 Words | 1 Page
  • Cell Phone Effects on the Human Brain
    Cell Phone Effects on the Human Brain There are three main reasons why people are concerned that cell phones (also known as “wireless” or “mobile” telephones) might have the potential to cause certain types of cancer or other health problems. Firstly cell phones emit radiofrequency energy (radio waves), a form of non-ionizing radiation. Tissues nearest to where the phone is held can absorb this energy. The number of cell phone users has increased rapidly. As of 2010, there were more than 303...
    769 Words | 3 Pages
  • Engaging Into a Boy-Girl Relationship at a Young Age: for Better or for Worse?
    Chapter 1 Introduction According to Bushong (2009), radiation is an energy that moves through space or matter at a very high speed. This energy can be in the form of particles, such as alpha or beta particles, which are emitted from radioactive materials, or waves such as light, heat, radiowaves, microwaves, x-rays and gamma rays. He also mentioned that radioactive materials which is also known as radionuclides or radioisotopes are atoms that are unstable. So, there is a tendency for unstable...
    6,524 Words | 19 Pages
  • Transuranic Elements - 562 Words
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