Indian Ocean Essays & Research Papers

Best Indian Ocean Essays

  • Indian Ocean - 324 Words
    Michael Machuca Mr. Pitz AP World History 4/22/2013 Changes and Continuities in the Commerce of the Indian Ocean From the time of 650 C.E. to 1750 C.E. the commerce in the Indian Ocean had many changes and continuities. During the great trading routes long lifetime, it had powerful effects on the religion, people, and most importantly, the goods; these included spices, silks, perfumes, oils, and textiles. Many different peoples including the Indians, Arabs, and Chinese dominated the vast...
    324 Words | 1 Page
  • Atlantic Ocean and Indian Ocean Region
    tfrtftgfygdfgrffffffffzzzzzgdfr1. Analyze the changes and continuities in commerce in the Indian Ocean region from 650 c.e. to 1750 c.e. THESIS: In the period between 650 C.E. and 1750 C.E., the Indian Ocean region endured both change and continuity. CHANGES: Who dominated the trade, use to be used mostly by Indians and the Chinese but by 1750 Europe dominated most of all commerce.tfrtftgfygdfgrffffffffzzzzzgdfr1. Analyze the changes and continuities in commerce in the Indian Ocean...
    488 Words | 2 Pages
  • Indian Ocean Trade - 2183 Words
    | Indian Ocean Trade | Global Trade System beginning in the 1500s | | Kendra Turner-Phillips | 12/8/2009 | | Indian Ocean Trade Global Trade System beginning in the 1500s The Indian Ocean, considered the third largest ocean, is located between Australia and Antarctica. This Ocean is a major sea lane connecting the Middle East, East Asia and Africa with Europe and the Americas. The Ocean is essential because of its location. The location helps to boast the production of...
    2,183 Words | 6 Pages
  • Indian Ocean Region - 498 Words
    Indian Ocean Region The Indian Ocean is the world's third largest ocean covering an area of over 28 million square miles. It is bounded by land masses on three sides. The exact boundaries of the Indian Ocean region has been argued but there is general agreement that it includes Cape Agulhas at the southernmost point of Africa, the Suez Canal, the entirety of the Persian Gulf, the Strait of Malacca, the Singapore Strait, and the west coast of Tasmania. The Indian Ocean region is comprised...
    498 Words | 2 Pages
  • All Indian Ocean Essays

  • Trans Saharan and Indian Ocean
     The Trans-Saharan and the Indian Ocean trade are two of the most important trade routes during the Post Classical Era (600CE- 1450CE) especially during the rise of African civilization and the Middle Ages. Both of these trade routes spread wealth, were Arab controlled, and a significant aspect for the dissemination of Islam; however, the differences in geography and resources traded set them apart from each other. Although they have very different geography, the Trans- Saharan and Indian...
    783 Words | 11 Pages
  • Indian Ocean Trade Essay
    Abbi Green Period 5 12-11-13 CCOT Essay Indian Ocean Trade During the time period between 300 CE and 1450 CE the Indian Ocean Trade was consistent of its spread of goods, religion, and the growth of trade route under different empires. On the other hand, the significant changes were the ways of trade, diffusion of religion, and empires controlling the trade route. Economically, the Indian Ocean Trade stayed the same in the way of spreading goods, but changed in the means of trading....
    458 Words | 2 Pages
  • European Domination of the Indian Ocean Trade
    Prior to the arrival of the Portuguese in the in the Indian Ocean in 1498, no single power had attempted to monopolize the sea lanes that connected the ports of the Indian sub-continent with the Middle East and East Africa on the West, and the ports of South East Asia and China to the East. Unlike in the Mediterranean where during Roman (and earlier) times, rival powers attempted to control the oceanic trade through military means, peaceful trade had remained the norm in the Indian Ocean....
    2,391 Words | 7 Pages
  • Case Study of Indian Ocean Tsunami
    Case Study of the Indian Ocean Tsunami On December 26, 2004, the Indian Ocean earthquake, or the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, caused a tsunami that killed 230,000 people and was recorded as the deadliest tsunami in known history. The earthquake was recorded as between 9.1 and 9.3 on the Richter scale, the second largest earthquake ever recorded. It was also recorded as the longest one, triggering earthquakes as far away as Alaska. Following the disaster, a worldwide effort raised billions of...
    1,019 Words | 3 Pages
  • Change and Continuity of Indian Ocean Trade
    Continuities and Changes of the Commerce of the Indian Ocean Region from 650 C.E. to 1750 C.E. Trade has been a major way to connect people to other parts to the world and to access to other products all throughout the world. Today, trade connects nations and products of the western hemisphere to those of the eastern hemisphere. The Indian Ocean was a major trading zone for the areas surrounding it in the time period from 650 C.E. to 1750 C.E. Several aspects of this trading area stayed...
    608 Words | 2 Pages
  • Silk Road and Indian Ocean Trade
    The Silk Road, once a popular trade route, slowly was overshadowed by the growing Indian Ocean trade. The Indian Ocean trade route was more efficient, easier to travel, and much faster. Meanwhile the Silk Road became less traveled because of its harsh geography, the spread of disease, and the fall of the empires that supported the trade. Differences in geography caused the Silk Road to decline and expanded the Indian Ocean trade. Both routes experienced different...
    565 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Indian Ocean Earthquake and Tsunami of 2004
    Eatman, Ligaya Dr. Causey and Dr. Roth-Burnett UACU: Gateway 200 20 May 2012 The Indian Ocean Earthquake and Tsunami of 2004 The tsunami of 2004 was a very devastating loss for many people around the eastern coast of India. It caused a lot of damage to the area. Even though the tsunami was pretty bad, some of the effected countries were able to start quickly recovering. The tsunami was a very traumatic experience for people in east India. It caused destruction in about 18 countries. It...
    353 Words | 2 Pages
  • Change over Time : Indian Ocean
    Change Over Time: Indian Ocean The Indian Ocean trade began in 650 A.D. and lasted until 1750. When the Indian Ocean trade began it was very simple but over the years there were many changes. The desire to have more goods had increased and soon enough so did technology which made the Indian Ocean trade more efficient. The Indian Ocean trade was influenced by variation of many political power and it was the key-factor to the east-west exchange connecting non-neighboring countries and the...
    485 Words | 2 Pages
  • Indian Ocean Region Trade Ap World Paper
    The Indian Ocean region trade had many changes and continuities between 650 and 1750 CE. Economically, Indian Ocean trade stayed the same with its spread of goods from region to region, but changed because of the ways goods were traded along this trade route. Culturally, the Indian Ocean trade stayed the same because of that same continuous spread of ideas and religion, and changed because of the diffusion of the religions already dominant in regions. Politically, the Indian Ocean trade stayed...
    1,005 Words | 3 Pages
  • Trade route systems, Mediterranean and Indian Ocean
    There was much diversity between Mediterranean Sea and Indian Ocean trade. For example, in the Mediterranean, sailors used square sails and long banks oars to maneuver among the sea's many islands. But the traders of the Indian Ocean built sails the shape of triangles and did not use oars. Another example would be that the Indian Ocean ship builders would make the ships by piercing and tying planks of wood and then caulking them together with bitumen. The shipbuilders of the Mediterranean,...
    482 Words | 2 Pages
  • Changes and Continuties over Indian Ocean Trade
    Changes and Continuities Over The Indian Ocean Trade The Indian Ocean trade was efficient sea-based trade routes that brought not only various good but also ideas and cultural diversities. It dates back to as early as 2000 BCE and continued being used for centuries after. Indian ocean trade remained relatively peaceful, in spite of this the kingdoms and religions that dominated the region changed frequently. The kingdoms and people involved with the Indian Ocean trade changed frequently...
    616 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Indian Ocean Trade Network 100 - 1500
    The Indian Ocean Trade Network 100 - 1500 The Indian Ocean Trade spread diseases and created more feuds, but mostly, it linked cultures, spread new religions, enhanced trading skills, and increased economic growth in several different regions of the world. Before the Indian Ocean Trade, most regions knew nothing of their neighboring civilizations. This trade network united the world. Because of it, just about all civilizations are conversant with each other. The Indian Ocean Trade began with...
    518 Words | 2 Pages
  • Changes and Continuities in Commerce in the Indian Ocean Region from 650 to 1750 C.E.
    Changes and continuities in commerce in the Indian ocean region from 650 to 1750 C.E. In the period between 650 C.E. and 1750 C.E., the Indian Ocean region endured both change and continuity. One continuity is simply trade, for this 1,100 years the Indian ocean was an important trading zone. One change in Indian ocean trade over those years was which country dominated trade their. Over those years the Indian ocean was controlled by the Indians, the Arabs, the Chinese, and last but not least...
    703 Words | 2 Pages
  • Cross-Cultural Emmerment from East Africa to the Indian Ocean Basin
    During the post-classical era (500 CE – 1000 CE), multiple kingdoms developed throughout the Indian Ocean Basin where societal practices of India had a huge impact, causing cross-cultural shifts in economical practices, religious views, and trade, resulting in increased population and agricultural growth. India, China, and East Africa were the three main societies that were impacted. The development of economics was influenced greatly. Most other kingdoms created a money system using...
    628 Words | 2 Pages
  • Ccot Commerce in the Indian Ocean Region from 650 Ce to 1450 Ce
    Since it first began, Indian Ocean commerce has been a linking force in the surrounding region. However, it has not all remained the same. Between 650 CE and 1450 CE, Indian Ocean trade routes and dominating groups changed significantly, while the goods they traded remained largely the same. Trade routes used by Indian Ocean mariners were important to the region's commerce. They needed to find faster, easier routes to the destination. At first, many merchants would have to sail to far away...
    393 Words | 1 Page
  • Origins of the Ocean - 480 Words
    How did the ancient oceans change to become what we now see today? It is a popular opinion that the World was once a supercontinent called “Pangaea”. At this time there was only one ocean called “Panthalassa”. The pieces of the supercontinent were giant plates that fit together like a jigsaw puzzle. Through years and years of continental drift, the giant jigsaw pieces became the continents of the world we know today. The splitting apart of the continents gave way to new oceans. The...
    480 Words | 2 Pages
  • Indian Trade - 320 Words
    In the period between 650 C.E. and 1750 C.E., the Indian Ocean region endured both change and continuity. One continuity is simply trade, for this 1,100 years the Indian Ocean was an important trading zone. One change in Indian Ocean trade over those years was which country dominated trade there. Over those years the Indian Ocean was controlled by the Indians, the Arabs, the Chinese, and last but not least the Europeans. There was continuity and change in trade in the Indian Ocean over the...
    320 Words | 1 Page
  • Lake: Ocean and Lakes - 1488 Words
    LAKE A lake is a body of relatively still water of considerable size, localized in a basin, that is surrounded by land apart from a river, stream, or other form of moving water that serves to feed or drain the lake. Lakes are inland and not part of the ocean and therefore are distinct from lagoons, and are larger and deeper thanponds.[1][2] Lakes can be contrasted with rivers or streams, which are usually flowing. However most lakes are fed and drained by rivers and streams.Natural lakes are...
    1,488 Words | 4 Pages
  • Overview of Indian Garment Industry
    Overview of the Indian Garment Industry By: M. K. Panthaki (Clothing Manufacturers' Association of India) Overview of the Indian Garment Industry By: M. K. Panthaki The Garment Industry of India is an Rs -one trillion industry. Almost 33 % of its knitwear production and about 20% of its woven-garment production, both by volume, enters export markets. Overall about 25 % of the volume of its garment production goes into export markets, leaving 75 % for domestic consumption. The Industry...
    704 Words | 2 Pages
  • Cultural Influences on Indian and African Business
    Cultural Influences on Indian and African Business Erik T. Ringstad Columbia Southern University MBA 6631 – Intercultural Management Dr. Chizoba Madueke Throughout the progression of this class, a variety of discussions and readings on culture and the effects of culture on business have been addressed and analyzed. The culture diversity found around the world is grand and gaining a better understanding of these differences only further one’s success in the business world. The...
    1,316 Words | 4 Pages
  • Indian Nationalism as Portrayed in Attenborough's "Gandhi"
    Jonathan Giraldo ENG3340/Mon – Wed Professor Murray Nationalism as Portrayed in Attenborough’s “Gandhi” The term ‘nationalism’ evokes several feelings with which one can try to define the term but never with a concrete definition. Some define the term as a strong identification of a group of individuals with a political entity defined in national terms, i.e. a nation. Others might say that nationalism is the belief that an ethnic group has a right to statehood. Benedict Anderson...
    1,286 Words | 4 Pages
  • Southernization Essay - Ap World History
    Southernization Essay The idea of Southernization came from the observation that "Southern" values and beliefs were becoming more important to the success of the government, reaching a climax in the 1990s, with a Democratic president and vice-president from the South, and Congressional leaders in both parties originating in the South. Some would agree that Southern values started to become more and more important in national elections through the early 21st century. American journalists...
    2,075 Words | 6 Pages
  • Facts about Southeast Asia and Trade
    01/01/12 Cornell Notes 207-212 World History Pre-Ap What were the three distinct trade regions?Who dominated the trade in these regions?What Greek ship pilot was said to have discovered the monsoon winds?What were the differences between ships used in the Indian and Med. Oceans?By 2000 B.C.E., what did Sumerian records show?What did Southeast Asian settlers do 2000 years ago, who did they trade with and...
    542 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Earth and Its People: Chapter 13 Outline
    Tropical Africa and Asia (1200 – 1500) Ibn Battuta 1. Young Muslim scholar 2. Completed the pilgrimage to mecca 3. logged 75,000 miles of travel in 29 years 4. Powerful states and commercial systems were only made possible by local farmers, fishermen and pastoralists Tropical Lands and Peoples The Tropical Environment 1. Africa lies almost entirely within the tropics, as do southern Arabia, most of India and all of the Southeast Asian mainland and islands 2. In the...
    1,636 Words | 6 Pages
  • Change And Continuity - 389 Words
    Geraldine Ojeda Ayala Pd 3 Even though trade and the trading items in the Indian ocean region remained constant from 650 C.E. to 1750 C.E, maritime navigational technology improved along with monsoon seasonal winds to help facilitate trade. ​ Throughout the 650 C.E. to 1750 C.E. era, the Indian Ocean coastal regions experienced changes and continuities economically as commerce evolved. Between 650 C.E. and 1750 C.E there were many continuities such as the use of the same trade ...
    389 Words | 1 Page
  • Social Studies Form 2
    Section A : INDIAN OCEAN 1. The largest ocean in the world is A. Pacific Ocean B. Arctic Ocean C. Indian Ocean D. Antarctic Ocean 2. The line of latitude that divides the world into two is A. Tropic of Capricorn B. Tropic of Cancer C. Equator D. Greenwich Meridian 3. Which stretch of water is found between East Africa and Madagascar? A. Mozambique Channel B. Red Sea C. Arabian Sea D. Persian Gulf 4....
    353 Words | 3 Pages
  • change and continuity - 690 Words
    Indian Ocean Trade around the first century CE. Established by multilingual, multiethnic seafarers. Between Indian Ocean and South China Sea. Didn’t play a part in the rise or fall of kingdoms. They are able to figure out the wind and monsoon patterns. Mediterranean sailors use square sails, long banks of oars, ships are nailed together. Indian Ocean sailors use triangular sails, no oars, and tied ships. Impact: Africa provides exotic animals, wood, and ivory. Somalia and Southern Arabia...
    690 Words | 3 Pages
  • Deez Nuts - 631 Words
    Article I: “We have arrived! We have hit the jackpot!” yelled Zheng He as his ship and the rest of the fleet docked at the coast. Today, Zheng He and his fleet of ships have finally arrived from their year long journey. Many people have been expecting them to return but no one knew exactly when they’ll be back. The ships that were led by Zheng He were 400 feet long and about 160 feet wide, each. The ships contained a large cargo area in the lower part of the ship. The cargo area pretty much...
    631 Words | 2 Pages
  • string of pearls - 1839 Words
    STRING OF PEARLS Introduction String of pearls is the name given to strategic encirclement of India by China in Indian Ocean WHICH comprises a chain of Chinese facilities, commercial or military, along its sea lanes of communication, extending from the Chinese mainland to Africa. This runs through many choke points like Strait of Mandeb, Strait of Hormuz and Strait of Malacca. The term was first used in US DoD report. But China insists that its strategy is entirely...
    1,839 Words | 7 Pages
  • Ap World History Essay 1
    From 650 CE to 1750 CE, commerce in the Indian Ocean went through many changes and continuities. The continuities involve the use of the same trade routes to export and import goods among traders and economic groups of the Indian Ocean basin. As for the change, there was an increase in involvement from European traders, because over time, they began to colonize and undergo economic ambitions. During this time, commerce in the Indian Ocean developed rapidly. ...
    735 Words | 1 Page
  • Continuities and Changes in South Asia
    Patrisha Alfonso AP World History Period 2 3 February 2013 Continuities and Changes in South Asia In 1450, India was a divided land. Lack of central unified power had caused the frequent invasions from foreign armies or groups such as that of the Muslims, which slowly occupied and ruled the region, the Portuguese, Aryas, and Turkish armies. Yet the impact that the Europeans had settled in this divided subcontinent is diverse and had changed India immensely with their distinct ideas and...
    623 Words | 2 Pages
  • China Vs, AFrica - 624 Words
    China V.S. Africa From 600 to 1450 BCE the life of the Chinese and the life of the African had a good amount of similarities and differences politically, socially, and economically. Much like many other places over the world trade and advances in technological studies dominated both economies while religion differences and women’s rights (aka gender roles) dominated their social life. All while this was going on, social classes dominated their political systems. Both China and Africa...
    624 Words | 2 Pages
  • India's Land Resource - 585 Words
    Land Resources in India envelop approximately 1.3 million sq miles and is a cape protruding into the Indian Ocean in between the Bay of Bengal on the east and Arabian Sea on the west. In spite of sufficient accessibility of landed topography, population pressure in the country is excessive and that makes space for both food production and the real estate market. However, land resources in India are both essential and at shortage in present days. Land resources in India are considered as...
    585 Words | 2 Pages
  • AP Silk Road - 1639 Words
    Dean Yeostros Silk Road Essay 10-12-12 Period 6 During the time between 300 C.E. and 1450 C.E. the trade routes between the Eurasian landmass and Africa were primarily along the Silk Road which ran from Eastern China to the Middle East. The sea based trade was also very large between India and Africa. These trade routes were affected by factors such as religion, the extensive trade of precious items and the rise and fall of several empires. But through it all,...
    1,639 Words | 4 Pages
  • Ap World History Chapter 21 Summary
    Chapter 21 A. The Toltec and the Mexica 1. Toltecs emerge in the ninth and tenth centuries after the collapse of Teotihuacan a. Established large state, powerful army mid-tenth to the mid-twelfth century b. Tula was the Toltec capital city and center of trade c. Maintained close relations with societies of the Gulf coast and the Maya 2. Toltec decline after twelfth century d. Civil strife at Tula, beginning in...
    2,488 Words | 10 Pages
  • In an Antique Land - 2325 Words
    IN AN ANTIQUE LAND BY AMITAV GHOSH In An Antique Land is a very capturing and an educative chronicle of a traveler, Amitav Ghosh, who perfectly weaves Indian and Egyptian history into one single story spread across various time periods. As the contents of the book suggests, the novel is divided into six parts namely, the Prologue, Lataifa, Nashawy, Mangalore, Going Back and Epilogue. The story begins with the Prologue where Ghosh reads a “short article by the scholar E. Strauss, in the 1942...
    2,325 Words | 6 Pages
  • Environmental Differences - 794 Words
    Environmental differences affected social, political, and economic institutions in the Delhi Sultanate, the Swahili city-states, and Mali. Many of these differences helped the civilizations, but some affected them badly. Mali had abundant rainfall and a very tropic climate which helped with the fertile soil in the area for farming. Although there was also high mountain ranges and plateaus that had cooler weather and shorter growing seasons. Malians adapted to this tropic climate by using their...
    794 Words | 3 Pages
  • Ch15studyguide - 430 Words
    Name__________________________________ Per ______ Date __________________ 15 Study Guide- Maritime Revolution, to 1550 Using complete sentences, answer the following questions on a separate sheet of paper. You must use the question as the stem of your answer. 1. Who was the island of Madagascar settled by? 2. Why was it less difficult to sail the Indian Ocean than other places? 3. What Chinese dynasty launched expeditions in the Indian Ocean between 1405 and 1433 to inspire awe about...
    430 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Real Mermaids - 499 Words
    Dugond Maybe, as a child, everyone of you has wanted to see a real mermaid, because of all the stories you’ve heard for them. Surely you have imagined this sea creatures as a very beautiful ones, and you’ve thought they aren’t real. Actually they exist, but their real appearance isn’t so magical as you dreamt. The dugong is a large marine mammal. The word "dugong" derives from the Tagalog term dugong, meaning "lady of the sea". These enormous vegetarians can be found in warm coastal...
    499 Words | 2 Pages
  • Summary of Zheng- He - 569 Words
    Zheng He was a Muslim eunuch who served as a close confidant of the Yongle Emperor of China during the Ming Dynasty. He went on voyages to Southeast Asia, Sumatra, Java, Ceylon, India, Persia, Persian Gulf, Arabia, the red sea Egypt, and the Mozambique Channel. The number of his voyages vary depending on method of division, but he travelled at least seven times to The Western Ocean with his fleet. The fleet comprised 30,000 men and seventy ships at its height. He brought back to China...
    569 Words | 2 Pages
  • Ccot Between Africa and Eurasia Trade Networks from 300ce-1450ce
    April 24, 2013 Period 3 Changes and Continuity over Time There are plenty of changes yet some no changes in the trade works between Africa and Eurasia from 300CE-1450CE. The motives for creating trade relations was to get the necessary goods to live on as well as becoming richer despite of living in different regions. However the goods that were traded changed like gold, salt, indigo,...
    614 Words | 2 Pages
  • Period 3 Regional and Transregional In
    A. Existing trade routes including the Silk Roads, the Mediterranean Sea, the trans­Saharan and the Indian Ocean basins flourished and promoted the growth of powerful new trading cities. (such as—to mention just a few— Novgorod, Timbuktu, the Swahili city­states, Hangzhou, Calicut, Baghdad, Melaka, Venice, and, in the Americas, Tenochtitlan or Cahokia) Hannah Shapiro and Eliza Antonowich Prior knowledge ...
    12,631 Words | 13 Pages
  • The Trade Networks between Africa and Eurasia
    The trade networks between Africa and Eurasia from circa 300 C.E. to 1450 C.E. changed by means of Islam being founded as well as African-Eurasian trade was very limited but soon became much more advanced.. However, Monsoons were always a factor of these overseas trades, and the trade networks between African and Eurasia remained very important during this time period by means of the trade networks contributions to the Afro-Eurasian world. In 622 C.E., Islam was founded which helped flourish...
    690 Words | 2 Pages
  • comparison of life with seasons in nature
    at do you understand by the Standard Meridian? Answer Standard Meridian is the longitude on the basis of which a country’s standard time is determined. Standard meridians all over the world are generally those longitudes which are exactly divisible by 15°. The Standard Meridian of India lies at 82° 30′ E longitude and it passes through Mirzapur in Uttar Pradesh. The Indian Standard Time is five hours and thirty minutes ahead of the Greenwich Mean Time. Q4) Why is Indian Ocean named after...
    720 Words | 3 Pages
  • Ccot Essay - 459 Words
    CCOT Essay The Indian Ocean was a significant division of water that was bounded primarily by the Indian Subcontinent, the Arabian Peninsula, and eastern Africa. Many changes occurred over time in the area, especially from 500 BCE and 1400 CE. The interaction of Buddhism and Confucianism altered, increased wealth came to new towns and ports, and population increased due to advancements in technology. Though there were many changes, many things stayed constant in the region. The Indian Ocean...
    459 Words | 2 Pages
  • Networks of Communication and Exchange (Chapter 7) 300 Bce-600 Bce
    James Jones September 17, 2011 Block 3 Networks of Communication and Exchange (Chapter 7) 300 BCE-600 BCE I. The Silk Road A. Origins and Operations -The Chinese General Zhang Jian is credited as “originator of overland trade with the western lands.” He made 18 expeditions across deserts to west; he first went to Fergana river-valley. Helped to introduce new plants trees to China through the trade. - Long-distance trade was made important by China’s demand for western products....
    1,301 Words | 5 Pages
  • The Earth and It's Peoples Chapter 8 Outline: Networks of Communication and Exchange (300bce-1100ce)
    CH 8: Networks of Communication and Exchange, 300 B.C.E.—1100C.E. I. The Silk Road * Silk Road—the trade route linking the lands of the Mediterranean with China by way of Mesopotamia, Iran, and C. Asia. A. Origins of Operations * Parthians—named after homeland east of caspian sea—took over Iran and then Mesopotamia. They were a major force by 247 B.C.E. And had few written resources. There were several wars between the Parthians and the Seleucids, and later the Parthians...
    1,443 Words | 5 Pages
  • Chapter 13 and 15 Ap World Q&a
    CHAPTER 13: *The tropics were warm all year-round. The center of the tropical zone is marked by the equator. *The rainy and dry seasons in the Indian Ocean reflect the influence of monsoons. *To accommodate the uneven distribution of rainfall, South Indian farmers constructed elaborate irrigation canals. *Empires of Mail in West Africa and Delhi in Southern Asia both utilized Islamic administration. *Mansa Kankan Musa made a famous pilgrimage that served to demonstrate the enormous wealth...
    709 Words | 2 Pages
  • Unit 3 study guide
    AP World History Focus Questions for Key Concepts Period 3: Regional and Trans regional Interactions, c. 600 to c. 1450 CE Key Concept 3.1 Expansion and Intensification of Communication and Exchange Networks Answer Concepts & Relevant Factual Examples in Underline “Factoids” How did trade networks in the post-Classical Era compare to the Classical Era? Even though the Americas and Afro-Eurasia stayed separated, this era saw a deepening and widening of old and new networks of human...
    2,390 Words | 12 Pages
  • Zanj - 304 Words
    Taylor Bryant Hist 111-003 Dr. Bell October 30, 2014 ZanjIn the passage, “The Coast of the Zanj,” the author, al Mas’ udi, an Arab traveler gives us a brief over view of how the people on the east Africa coast lived. It began when Arab traders sought the land. The traders married the daughters of chiefs and would gain ownership of the lands of Zanj. Similar to other areas of the world, the people of Zanj have their own unique way of living. “The coast of the Zanj,” gives us insight on the...
    304 Words | 1 Page
  • You're a Kid No Matter What
    Analyze the change and continuities in commerce along the Indian Ocean from 650 to1750 C.E. Pgs. Across the Indian Ocean and the South China Sea, from 650- 1750 C.E., theIndian Ocean trade had many changes and continuities. Economically, the IndianOcean trade stayed the same with its spread of goods from one place to another, but changed because of the ways goods were traded along this trade route. Culturally,the Indian Ocean trade stayed the same because of the same continuous spread of...
    1,150 Words | 3 Pages
  • First Person Voyage of Zheng He
    We are finally headed home. It has been a long journey but we have accomplished a great deal. As you know, I was fortunate to be placed on Eunuch Zheng He’s flag ship, a treasure junk which is like a floating city with over 1,000 men. It is enormous and very luxurious, with grand accommodations for the imperial envoys. The body of the ship is brightly carved, with an animal head and glaring dragon eyes in the front and a dragon and phoenix pattern in the rear. The bottom holds of the ship...
    1,600 Words | 4 Pages
  • New World Trading Systems: Triangular Trade
    One of the two New World trading systems was the triangular trade. The triangular trade had three parts (legs) to it. The first leg included a route from Europe to Africa. These ships normally carried horses and European manufactured goods. For example; cloths and metal wares. When they arrived in Sub-Saharan Africa they exchanged these goods for slaves. One main reason why Africans would trade was for the gain of weapons. In the second leg of the trip the Europeans took enslaved Africans to the...
    463 Words | 2 Pages
  • Dream Vacation - 474 Words
    Dream Vacation If I could travel somewhere I would have to say my dream vacation would be to an African Safari. There are so many different ones to go see but if I could choose one I’d go with Mozambique Safaris .It is an excellent choice for a Luxury African Safar vacation. What makes a Mozambique Safari tour so spectacular? Bordered by warm, clean Indian Ocean waters, Mozambique’s unspoiled sandy beaches are amongst the best in the world. The Bazaruto Archipelago, Maputo, and...
    474 Words | 2 Pages
  • Research Paper on Bartholomew Dias
    Dalton Brown 10/7/12 Mrs Holly Core 4 Born in 1450, Bartolomeu Dias was sent by Portuguese King John II to explore the coast of Africa and find a way to the Indian Ocean. Bartolomeu Dias was a Portuguese explorer and he was in charge of the Royal Warehouse in Lisbon. He sailed through the west coast of Africa. Since he did that he opened the sea route to asia via the Atlantic and Indian oceans. Bartolomeu Dias was sent in this voyage to reach two main purposes, first to reach and find a...
    1,000 Words | 3 Pages
  • CCOT - 398 Words
    CCOT Cody Tavella P.3 When analyzing the commerce in the Indian Ocean Region from 650 CE to 1750 CE there were many changes and continuities. A significant consistency was the use of the trade routes because the traders and economic groups in the region continued to use the area to complete their transactions of exports and imports. A large change that happened was the increased involvement of the Europeans. Because over time they started to partake in the trading due to their colonizing...
    398 Words | 2 Pages
  • Cot Unit 4 Ap World History
    APWH Unit 4 COT essay: Commerce in the Indian Ocean In the Indian Ocean region from 650 C.E. to 1750 C.E., commerce changed in that there was a shift in dominance over trade, and the demand of certain products changes, and a continuity was the Europeans’ demands for goods from Asia. A change in commerce from 650 C.E. to 1750 C.E. was the changing of control over trade. Around 650 C.E., the Swahili dominated the trade, especially since there were so many coastal forts of the east side of...
    493 Words | 2 Pages
  • Ap World History Ccot
    From 300 CE to 1450 CE, changes occurred in trade networks between Africa and Eurasia through Silk Road revitalization and the items that were traded, while trade across the Mediterranean Sea remained constant. The revitalization of the Silk Road occurred due to political stability, while the trade items changed because people’s needs changed over time. Mediterranean Sea trade remained constant because the trading cities had stable economies as well as complex societies. One change in the...
    501 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Maritime Revolution: Class Notes
    Chapter 15 Q&A's 1. The Maritime Revolution: * Starts because of Ferdinand Magellan * Expedition to reach East Indies * Maritime era marked end of a long period. * Broadened and deepened contacts, alliances, & conflicts across ancient cultural boundaries. 2. Global Maritime Expansion Before 1450: * Strong ships were needed * New sailing techniques * Rewards for sea travel made them worthwhile 3. The Pacific Ocean: * Polynesians originated in Asia...
    1,095 Words | 5 Pages
  • chapter13 - 15489 Words
    CHAP TER 13 CHAP TER OUTLINE ● Tropical Lands and Peoples ● New Islamic Empires ● Indian Ocean Trade ● Social and Cultural Change ● Conclusion © Victor Englebert DIVERSITY + DOMINANCE Personal Styles of Rule in India and Mali ENVIRONMENT + TECHNOLOGY The Indian Ocean Dhow East African Pastoralists Herding large and small livestock has long been a way of life in drier parts of the tropics. Visit the website and ebook for additional study materials and interactive tools:...
    15,489 Words | 90 Pages
  • DBQ - 263 Words
     DBQ There were many social and economic effects of the global flow of silver from the mid 16th century to the early 18th century. Examples of this include the social change of Chinese traditions and the economic change of Asian inflation of silver. The global flow of sliver effected Chinese traditions. Documents 1 and 3 state that socially, from a non-bias point of view, that sliver is changing Chinese traditions because now if you have no silver at all, you won't have enough in society,...
    263 Words | 1 Page
  • Period 4 Unit Outline
    Period 4 Global Interactions c. 1450 to c. 1750 Key Concept 4.1. Globalizing Networks of Communication and Exchange I. In the context of the new global circulation of goods, there was an intensification of all existing regional trade networks that brought prosperity and economic disruption to the merchants and governments in the trading regions of the Indian Ocean, Mediterranean, Sahara and overland Eurasia. II. European technological developments in cartography and navigation built on...
    1,432 Words | 5 Pages
  • Trade in Latin America from 1450 to 1750.
    Trade in Latin America and India dramatically changed from 1450 to 1750. Around 1450 Latin America was not trading with Europe, Asia, or Africa. Around 1750 they were receiving slaves from Africa for plantation goods. In 1450, India was trading with Asia and east Africa through the Indian Ocean trade. In 1750 India traded a large number of textiles to Western Europe which ended up on Africa’s Western Coast and continued trade with eastern Asia and Africa. The changes Latin American and Indian...
    398 Words | 1 Page
  • sat essay - 585 Words
    Prompt Think carefully about the issue presented in the following excerpt and the assignment below. People assume that every accomplishment—each step in what we call progress—will lead to the solution to a problem and will help them reach the goal of understanding themselves and the world around them. In reality, however, each new answer provokes additional questions and each fresh discovery uncovers further complications. Every accomplishment leads to further problems, added...
    585 Words | 2 Pages
  • Trading systems in 600C.E - 1536 Words
    Kelsey October 3, 2013 AP World History Research Paper: Exchange Networks c. 300 BCE - c. 600CE From 300 BCE to 600 CE new technologies and greater familiarity with vast parts of the world led to the movement of people throughout Afro-Eurasia. This movement gave an opportunity to a greater transregional interaction among these places and nomadic societies. The increase in number and breadth was an outcome of the communication and exchange of networks. The biggest technology that drove...
    1,536 Words | 5 Pages
  • Gawadar port - 5180 Words
    Journal of Political Studies, Vol. 19, Issue - 2, 2012, 57:69 Strategic Importance of Gwadar Port Hasan Yaser Malik ♣ Abstract The pragmatic facets like geography and history have always imprinted the demographical mosaic and development of a civilisation. The civilisations have always developed along the waters. The waters have been used as trade route since long and the modern trade has further enhanced the need of trade through waters. Pakistan being a gateway to the strategically...
    5,180 Words | 20 Pages
  • Banyan Tree Case - 456 Words
    Banyan TREE Banyan Tree is founded in 1992 by Ho Kwon Ping.The first Banyan Tree opened in 1994 in Phuket Island.The resorts were designed to blend into the natural environment. Corporate Strategies K. P. Ho thinks that company should consider the physical and human environment when making business decisions Business Strategies Goals : “...one of the top two or three dominant players in a global space which is very niche but nevertheless very global” K. P. Ho said. Scope : Banyan Tree...
    456 Words | 3 Pages
  • Chapter 7 Networks of Communication and
    Chapter 7 Networks of Communication and Exchange: Focus Questions: 1. The factors that contributed to the growth of trade along the Silk Road is that it was located along the threshold of central Asia. All of the traders share customs with the steppe nomads farther to the East (202). The Chinese were eager to buy western products (203) which were another contributing factor for trade to be in one central area, because merchants would flock to that area. Cooperative relations between caravan...
    873 Words | 3 Pages
  • Islam and Women Harem Women
    Compare and contrast the Indian ocean (Swahili city-states), trans-Saharan (Sudanic states), and silk road trade routes. III. Kingdoms of the Grasslands A. Introduction 1. Three coasts – Atlantic, Indian, savanna on edge of Sahara 2. Edge of desert 1. Gold found 2. Camels improved trade a. Sahel – grassland belt – best place to live – centers of trade 3. African states emerge as trade intermediaries 4. Location makes them open to droughts and attack 5. 10th...
    795 Words | 4 Pages
  • Chapter 15 Outline - 1495 Words
    Chapter 15 Outline The Maritime Revolution to 1550 I. Global Maritime Expansion Before 1450 A. The Pacific Ocean -Historians have debated for years about Polynesian people and their sailing.Despite traveling over the vast Pacific Ocean and not being able to navigateusing the land (because of their distance from it, they could not follow the shoreline) The Polynesians left no written records on how they navigated, andhistorians debate over whether they were actually able to...
    1,495 Words | 5 Pages
  • Ap World Notes. the Maritime Revolution to 1550.
    AP world notes. The Maritime Revolution to 1550. Ferdinand Magellan * 1511-sailed from Europe around southern tip of Africa and east across Indian ocean * Member of first Portuguese expedition to explore east indies * 1521-goal was achieved by sailing across Atlantic rounding southern tip of South America and crossing pacific ocean * High price * Killed in battle April 27, 1521 while aiding a local ruler who promised to become Christian * Very little resources-...
    525 Words | 2 Pages
  • Tutorial 3F EMMA MAERSK
    FEATURES & CHARACTERISTICS OF EMMA MAERSK FEATURES Name Emma Maersk IMO Type Owner Shipyard Delivered Tonnage Length Breadth Service Speed 9321483 Container Vessel A.P. Moller-Maersk Group Odense Steel Shipyard Ltd 2006 11,000 TEU 396 m 56 m 25.20 knots CHARACTERISTICS • Recycling the exhaust, mixed with fresh air, back into the engine for reuse • High-efficiency waste heat recovery system • Electronically controlled engine. • The vessel hull is painted with a biocide-free, silicone-based...
    492 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Similarities Between the Early Civilizations
    The earliest civilizations that arose in the world developed in the late fourth and the third millennia BC in parts of Asia and north Africa. The three large alluvial systems of the Tigris-Euphrates, the Nile and the Indus supported three great ancient civilizations. Other urban communities also arose during this time. For example, settlement mounds known as tells or tepes, occur in almost all major valleys between Iraq and Pakistan in one direction and between the Caspian Sea and the Indian...
    303 Words | 1 Page
  • snatch theft - 462 Words
    I have been deeply moved on three occasions in my life. The first was when I stood on The top of a snowy peak in the Niligiris. My first sight of the sea was another occasion which moved me very deeply. But my first flight in the air was the most exciting experience in my life. I took A Journey By Air. I was travelling form Chennai to Maldives by air. I entered the aeroplan in the morning. At first it was no better than getting into a car or bus. The noise of the machine made me feel...
    462 Words | 2 Pages
  • public s[pewaking - 25352 Words
    MORDENISATION OF INDIAN ARMY F INSAS…. The F-INSAS program[edit] F-INSAS has been taken up to equip Indian infantry with advanced weaponry, communication network and instant access to information on the battlefield.[1] This program is similar to the future soldier programs of other nations. F-INSAS includes a fully networked all-terrain, all-weather personal-equipment platform, enhanced firepower and mobility for the digitalised battlefield of the future.[2] The weight carried by...
    25,352 Words | 81 Pages
  • Food Scarcity in India - 1100 Words
    Food Scarcity in India There is a problem in the World’s economy, and it is a bigger problem than most people actually realize. We cannot change the world in one day, so my essay pinpoints India. India is the seventh largest country in the entire world. This means there is a lot of land to produce food, and many people in the country to feed; 1.2 billion to be exact. The word “scarce” means not having enough; or a shortage. With as many people living in this country, you can imagine the fear...
    1,100 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Development of Swahili - 351 Words
    3. What did the development of Swahili demonstrate about the nature and workings of the Indian Ocean economy in early-modern times? The development and evolution of the Swahili language was significant in the respect that it is an example of the changes that were necessary for the Indian Ocean economy to survive. The coastal areas of East Africa saw influence from several fronts, notably Portuguese, Arabic and Persian influence especially in terms of the development of the Swahili language....
    351 Words | 1 Page
  • El Nino - 4887 Words
     Tanaya Devasthali TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 ABSTRACT……………………………………………………………………………………....3 2 REVIEW OF LITERATURE 2.1 INTRODUCTION……………………………………………………………………….3 2.2 DEFINING TERMS AND CONCEPTUALIZING RELATIONSHIPS 2.2.1 EL-NINO………………………………………………………………………...4 2.2.2 SOUTHERN OSCILLATION…………………………………………………6 2.2.3 LA NINA………………………………………………………………………...7 2.2.4 CLIMATE AND ITS MEASUREMENT……………………………………..7 2.2.5 CLIMATE SYSTEM……………………………………………………………8 2.2.6 CLIMATE VARIABILITY AND CLIMATE...
    4,887 Words | 15 Pages
  • Mr.Hxy - 335 Words
    Crossing the Red Sea 1 Many slept on deck Because of the day’s heat Or to watch a sunset They would never see again – Stretched out on blankets and pillows Against cabins and rails: Shirtless, in shorts, barefooted, Themselves a landscape Of milk-white flesh On a scoured and polished deck. Voices left their caves And silence fell from its shackles, Memories strayed From behind sunken eyes To look for shorelines – Peaks of mountains and green rivers That shared their secrets...
    335 Words | 1 Page
  • MS Access - 310 Words
    10/14/13 www.iroams.com/V1/printChallan?challan_type=sbi Applicant Copy Bank Copy RAILWAY RECRUITMENT CELL - SO UTHERN RAILWAY, CHENNAI RAILWAY RECRUITMENT CELL - SO UTHERN RAILWAY, CHENNAI E.N.NO : RRC 02 / 2013 date d 21-09-2013 E.N.NO : RRC 02 / 2013 date d 21-09-2013 INDIAN RAILWAY O NLINE APPLICATIO N MANAGEMENT SYSTEM INDIAN RAILWAY O NLINE APPLICATIO N MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Transaction Id Transaction Id Candidate Name DOB & Gender 2885341 GAJJELA...
    310 Words | 5 Pages
  • indo china relation , time line , conflicts
    India and china......japan..us The first stage involved agreeing on “political parameters and guiding principles,” and was concluded in 2005, two years after the current Special Representatives mechanism was introduced. The boundary talks are currently in the second of a three-stage process. The current stage — seen as the most difficult — involves agreeing on a framework to settle the dispute in western, middle and eastern sections of the disputed border. the two sides have done a lot of...
    5,342 Words | 14 Pages
  • Thematic Essay on Greece and Egypt
    Throughout history, geography has affected how areas develop because certain geographic factors cause different patterns of development. Additionally, once developed, those factors either encourage or impede cultural diffusion. Mountains caused the creation of city-states in Greece and hindered cultural diffusion while the location of East Africa led to small Swahili States and encouraged cultural diffusion. Greece encompasses a peninsula that is covered by mountain ranges. These mountains...
    539 Words | 2 Pages
  • maths - 293 Words
    The Eastern Africa Submarine Cable System (EASSy) is an undersea fibre optic cable system connecting countries in Eastern Africa to the rest of the world. EASSy runs from Mtunzini in South Africa to Port Sudan in Sudan, with landing points in nine countries and is connected to at least ten landlocked countries — which will no longer have to rely on satellite Internet access to carry voice and data services. EASSy is the highest capacity system serving sub-Saharan Africa, with a 4.72...
    293 Words | 1 Page
  • research paper - 1343 Words
    Division of City School TONDO HIGH SCHOOL Manila In Partial Fulfilment for The requirements in ENGLISH IV A RESEARCH PAPER On the study of ‘’Tsunami” By: Leonard N. See IV – EF1 Mrs. Grace Cortez Table of contents Acknowledgement…………………..………..…………1 Introduction………………………………………………2 Significants of study…………………………………3-5 What Cause Tsunamis,Ring of Fire & Earth and Earthquakes……………………………….….…..……6-7 What triggered this...
    1,343 Words | 5 Pages
  • Ap Unit 1&2 Foundations
    Foundations 14% of the AP Exam Climate Climate has been a major factor in determining where people settled. Peopled settled in areas that has climates that would accommodate agriculture and livestock. Time Periods • The Paleolithic Age refers to about 12,000 BC. During this time people were nomadic. • The Neolithic Age refers to the age from about 12,000 BC to about 8000 BC. It is during this time that people settled in communities and civilization began to emerge. • River Valley...
    4,308 Words | 26 Pages
  • English Essay - 595 Words
    English Essay The texts I have studied “Crossing the red sea” by Peter Skrzynecki and “The happiest refugee” by Anh Do communicate that journeys are challenging and difficult. In “Crossing the red sea”, it explored the challenges faced by polish migrants after World War II. They had to leave their home and travel to Australia by boat. It also showed us the difficulties they faced on the sea; they tried to survive with limited food and water they have and meanwhile they pray for a land to be...
    595 Words | 2 Pages
  • Plantation Slavery in the Middle East
    Plantation Slavery in Indian Ocean When topics such as African history and slavery are brought to mind, many American’s have a predetermined belief or idea on the subject. Such ideas may include that there is not much of African history until European presence, that African’s did not do anything of significance until the arrival of Europeans. Then, there are some beliefs that slavery was only a matter of American history. Both ideas are incorrect, in that there is plenty of evidence that...
    1,364 Words | 4 Pages
  • Managing Partner - 6161 Words
    The New Game in Asia Sheikh Rahman Senior Advisor November 5, 2012 ------------------------------------------------- In determining the course of Bangladesh’s foreign relations – the words of a famous Prussian /German statesman of the nineteenth century and renowned figure in world affairs Otto von Bismark may be appropriate - “if you have five neighbors, you need to be on good terms with at least three”. China and India are the two powerful nations in the region...
    6,161 Words | 17 Pages
  • Trade Network Essay Eurasian And African
    In the trade networks between Africa and Eurasia from circa 300 C.E. to 1450 C.E., there were key continuities and changes. Although there was some continuity in Eurasian and African trade, it was mainly the key changes that led to advancements in technology, trade networks and involvement of other societies in trade. In 300 C.E., there was limited trade between Africa and Eurasia. The dominant civilizations involved in trade were China Rome, and India. Shortly after the classical civilizations...
    548 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Journey of a Man - 315 Words
    According to the recent single origin hypothesis, human ancestors originated in Africa, and eventually made their way out to the rest of the world. Analysis of the Y chromosome is one of the methods used in tracing the history of early humans. Thirteen genetic markers on the Y-chromosome differentiate populations of human beings.! It is believed, on the basis of genetic evidence, that all human beings in existence now descend from one single man who lived in Africa about 60,000 years...
    315 Words | 1 Page
  • Trade in Ancient Africa - 1336 Words
    After the collapse of the Roman Empire in 476 AD and the subsequent loss of the Meroe and Aksum as commercial entrepots, a void fell over trade in the Indian Ocean that would persist until 750 AD, which signaled the beginning of Muslim dominance in the area. Initially confined to the Persian Gulf, Muslims began to expand their circle of influence to the eastern coast of Africa. Like Meroe and Aksum, the eastern coast of Africa provided a pipeline to the interior luxuries of the continent, as...
    1,336 Words | 4 Pages
  • Weather and Monsoon Season - 306 Words
    The winds can knock down trees and even do some damage to people's houses or buildings - windows may be broken and trees may fall on houses. The floods also cause people serious problems. People may be walking down the street, wading through waist-deep water. The floods from the extreme rain can spread bacteria as well. The dirty water that hundreds of other people have been wading through can be a good breeding ground for harmful bacteria and it helps spread deadly diseases. Mosquitoes breed in...
    306 Words | 1 Page
  • APWORLDC CCCOTS Copy - 778 Words
    Final Exam Essay Prep BELOW ARE THE POSSIBLE C&C AND CCOT ESSAYS GOING BACK TO THE FIRST YEAR OF THE EXAM IN 2002. FOR EACH PART OF THE FINAL EXAM, YOU WILL HAVE TWO CHOICES FROM AMONG THE FOLLOWING ESSAYS. 2012 CCOT 2. Analyze continuities and changes in trade networks between Africa and Eurasia from circa 300 C.E. to 1450 C.E. CC 3. Compare demographic and environmental effects of the Columbian Exchange on the Americas with the Columbian Exchange’s demographic and environmental effects...
    778 Words | 5 Pages
  • Silk Road and Sub-Saharan Trade Rout
    This chapter discusses the affect of the Silk Road and the exchange networks that occurred between 300 BCE until 1100 CE. The routes were brought up in this chapter, which were the Silk Road, the Indian Ocean, and the trans-Saharan trade route. These routes were used to transport goods, livestock, ideas, and shape new cultures. The Silk Road connected China to the Middle East across Central Asia and Iran. This route was necessitated by the Chinese demand for western products such as horses and...
    601 Words | 2 Pages
  • El Nina and La Niña
    Geography In this essay I will be discussing the economic, environmental and social effects of El Niño and La Niña on Africa. El Niño and La Niña events are a natural part of the global climate system. They happen when the Pacific Ocean and the atmosphere above it change from their normal state for several seasons. El Niño events cause warming of the central and eastern tropical Pacific, while La Niña events cause the opposite, with the cooling of the same areas. La Niña causes wet conditions...
    327 Words | 1 Page
  • How the Octopus Close Season Affected Women's Life in Rodrigues
    THE OCTOPUS CLOSE SEASON PROGRAMME. How it affected the “Piqueuse D’ourite in their daily life? Rodrigues is a 108 square kilometre, volcanic originated island, located in the Indian Ocean at around 600 kilometres at the east of the mainland Mauritius. It is surrounded by coral reef forming a lagoon with a rich biodiversity, which as twice the size of the land It was formerly known as the tenth district of Mauritius, up to the 10th of December 2002, where it attained the...
    824 Words | 3 Pages

All Indian Ocean Essays