Hypothalamus Essays & Research Papers

Best Hypothalamus Essays

  • Hypothalamus - 267 Words
    Hypothalamus The hypothalamus may be very small, but it plays a very important role. The hypothalamus is about the size of a pearl, and it weighs about four grams in a brain that weighs on average about 1,400 grams. It directs so many important functions for the body some examples of what it controls are Autonomic function control , endocrine function control, Homeostasis, motor function control, food and water intake, body temperature, and the release of 8 major hormones. The...
    267 Words | 1 Page
  • hypothalamus - 667 Words
    The Hypothalamus is a part of the Limbic system that directs a multitude of important functions in the body. It is roughly a size of a pearl, located just behind and between the eyes, below the thalamus and just above the brainstem. All vertebrates’ brain contains a hypothalamus, and it is highly interconnected with other parts of central nervous system. It links the nervous system to the endocrine system through the pituitary gland. This area of the brain is small, but involved in many...
    667 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Hypothalamus - 441 Words
    The Hypothalamus The hypothalamus is a small, but extremely important part of the brain. It is also known as the brain’s brain. It controls many different aspects of the body, and it is no larger than the size of a golf ball. This remarkable piece of the brain does so many different things for the body, so let’s study it. The Hypothalamus controls aspects of the endocrine, autonomic, and behavioral functions. (1) The hypothalamus controls the release of 8 major hormones, temperature...
    441 Words | 2 Pages
  • Hypothalamus - 1589 Words
    Regulation of distal organs such as the adrenal cortex. Anatomy Circle of Willis, above it is the hypothalamus; pituitary and pituitary stalk on either side of the 3rd ventricle. Pituitary is within the bony socket, at the base of the stalk. Salatarcica with the pituitary stalk passing down Cingulate gyrus and sulcus Fornix which comes out of the hippocampus Intraventricular foramen – in front of the thalamus and behind the fornix, through which CSF can pass through the ventricles....
    1,589 Words | 5 Pages
  • All Hypothalamus Essays

  • Hypothalamus Gains Admittance - 1115 Words
    The hypothalamus is a small, vital section of the brain located just below the thalamus; it is in charge of numerous important bodily functions. The hypothalamus is shaped like a cone and ends in the pituitary stalk, a part of the pituitary gland. It forms the major portion of the ventral region of diencephalons, and oversees autonomic and metabolic processes. The hypothalamus is the connection between the nervous system and the endocrine system, creating this link by producing and secreting...
    1,115 Words | 3 Pages
  • Motivated Behaviour and the Role of the Hypothalamus
    The behaviours of eating and sexual activity in humans are regarded in terms of motivated behaviour such that they appear to be purposeful and directed toward a goal. The hypothalamus is a brain structure located deep within the brain that, although small in size less than 1% of the brains total mass, is largely responsible for and controls a wide variety of human behaviour including motivation, eating, sexual activity and emotion. However in trying to understand this role it is important to...
    3,197 Words | 10 Pages
  • The fight or Flight - 490 Words
    The "Fight or Flight" response The flight or fight response, also called the "acute stress response" was first described by Walter Cannon in the 1920s as a theory that animals react to threats with a general discharge of the sympathetic nervous system.[4] [5] In response to acute stress, acetylcholine is released from preganglionic sympathetic nerves that innervate the chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla. As a consequence, the chromaffin cells secrete the hormone epinephrine...
    490 Words | 2 Pages
  • Effects of Alcohol on Brain Functioning and Neurotransmitters
    Effects of alcohol on brain functioning and neurotransmitters The consumption of alcohol can cause an effect on several parts of the brain including the hypothalamus, pituitary gland, medulla and the limbic system (How alcohol works 2008). Each sector responds differently to alcohol, causing changes in specific behaviors. Cerebral cortex The role of the cerebral cortex is to decipher information received from the senses, processing thought, speech, and memory and indicating the majority...
    1,042 Words | 4 Pages
  • Endocrine System - 2983 Words
    Study Guide, Chapter 16 The Endocrine System Endocrine System: Overview Acts with nervous system to coordinate and integrate activity of body cells Influences metabolic activities via hormones transported in blood Response slower but longer lasting than nervous system Endocrinology Study of hormones and endocrine organs Endocrine System: Controls and integrates Reproduction Growth and development Maintenance of electrolyte, water, and nutrient balance of blood Regulation...
    2,983 Words | 18 Pages
  • hormones - 6010 Words
     HORMONES Hormones are a class of regulatory biochemicals produced in all multicellular organisms by glands, and transported by the circulatory system to a distant target organ to coordinate its physiology and behavior. They serve as a major form of communication between different organs and tissues. Hormones regulate a variety of physiological and behavioral activities, including digestion, metabolism, respiration, tissue function, sensory perception, sleep,excretion,...
    6,010 Words | 23 Pages
  • Energy Policy - 7518 Words
    0013-7227/01/$03.00/0 Printed in U.S.A. Endocrinology 142(10):4163– 4169 Copyright © 2001 by The Endocrine Society Minireview: Ghrelin and the Regulation of Energy Balance—A Hypothalamic Perspective TAMAS L. HORVATH, SABRINA DIANO, PETER SOTONYI, MARK HEIMAN, ¨ MATTHIAS TSCHOP AND Reproductive Neuroscience Unit (T.L.H., S.D.), Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Department of Neurobiology (T.L.H.), Yale Medical School, New Haven, Connecticut 06520; Department of Anatomy and Histology...
    7,518 Words | 22 Pages
  • Smarter Than A 5th Grader?
    Psychopharmacology (1998) 135 : 319–323 © Springer-Verlag 1998 O R I G I NA L I N V E S T I G AT I O N Allen T.G. Lansdowne · Stephen C. Provost Vitamin D3 enhances mood in healthy subjects during winter Received: 28 May 1996 / Final version: 6 May 1997 Abstract Mood changes synchronised to the seasons exist on a continuum between individuals, with anxiety and depression increasing during the winter months. An extreme form of seasonality is manifested as the clinical...
    3,897 Words | 15 Pages
  • Endocrine organ and hormones study guide
    Endocrine Organs and Hormones Hormones of the Posterior Lobe ADH Gland Produced- Produced in Hypothalamus and released in Posterior Pituitary. Target Organs- Kidneys and Blood vessels Stimulus- Increase plasma osmolarity and decrease Blood Volume Function- Increase H2o reabsorption and Vasoconstriction Disorders- Diabetes Insipidus and SIADH ( Syndrome of Inappropriate ADH secretion) Oxytocin Gland Produced- Produced in Hypothalamus and released in Posterior Pituitary. Target...
    973 Words | 5 Pages
  • Genetics - 5523 Words
     1. The coiled tubular structures arising from the dermis that excrete sweat are the: sudoriferous glands  2. The outer layer of skin is called the: epidermis  3. Melan/o/cytes in the stratum basale layer of the epidermis produce Melanin (means black like nigra), which is responsible for: skin color  4. The layer of skin that is sometimes referred to as true skin is the: dermis or cutis  5. The combining forms that mean "nail" are: unguin/o- or onycho-  6. The...
    5,523 Words | 20 Pages
  • The Effect of Body Chemistry and the Potential Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa:
    | The Effect of Body Chemistry and The Potential Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa: | | 12/11/2011 | | | | The Effect of Body Chemistry and The Potential Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa: Today, in the united states especially, Eating Disorders are at an all time high. Most individuals would typically believe that these issues are simply psychological. However, recent studies have shown that there is much more to it. Is it possible that eating disorders esp. Anorexia Nervosa have...
    1,340 Words | 4 Pages
  • Pituitary glands - 752 Words
    The pituitary glands are located in the brain. The pituitary is functionally related to, physically connected to, and, along with the target organs, controlled by the hypothalamus. The pituitary gland is a pea sized gland that is divided into two parts, the anterior and posterior. These hormones help to drive sex hormones in men and women, stimulate the adrenal and thyroid glands, and regulate growth hormones in children, among other things. The hypothalamus and pituitary gland may play a...
    752 Words | 2 Pages
  • Endocrine System - 1759 Words
    Hypothalamus Secreted hormone | Abbreviation | Produced by | Effect | Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (Prolactin-releasing hormone) | TRH,, or | Parvocellular neurosecretory neurons | Stimulate thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) released fromanterior pituitary (primarily) Stimulate prolactin release from anterior pituitary | Dopamine (Prolactin-inhibiting hormone) | DA or PIH | Dopamine neurons of the arcuate nucleus | Inhibit prolactin released from anterior pituitary | Growth...
    1,759 Words | 9 Pages
  • Pinel - Hunger, Eating and Health
    Lecture 10a THE DUAL-CENTER SET-POINT MODEL OF EATINGCOURSE MATERIAL AND Pinel LECTURE NOTES Outline: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. The Early Studies Glucostatic and Lipostatic Theories v. Positive-Incentive Theories a. Glucostatic and Lipostatic Theories b. Positive-Incentive Theories Hypothalamic Hunger and Satiety Centers and The Dual-Center Set-Point Model a. Ventromedial Hypothalamus b. Lateral Hypothalamus Positive-Incentive Models of Feeding Current Research on the Biopsychology of Eating a....
    2,666 Words | 9 Pages
  • Hormonal Regulation of Stress - 333 Words
    1. Hypothalamus: controls and regulates fighting, fleeing, feeding, and fornication. It also controls the endocrine system through the pituitary gland. This part of __________'s brain got enlarged due to her exposure to radioactive substances, so her fight/flight sense is heightened. She has a heightened ability to sense danger that is similar to Spiderman's spider-sense. She also grew tremendously in height because her enlarged hypothalamus influenced the behavior of her pituitary gland,...
    333 Words | 1 Page
  • Hca 220 Text of Ppt Presentation for Final
    HCA 220 Text for Final Presentation Confusion from High Above It is Monday, July 12, 2010 in Ontario, Canada. High above the city streets is the Watchmen’s Tower, a fifty-story building filled with offices, a food court, and a gym. On the 50th floor, a credit card call center houses fifteen employees. At 10:00 a.m., three of the fifteen employees begin complaining of feeling ill. By the time noon approached, the employees, Sarah Johns; Emily Gadsphatchel; and Nick Cousins, complained of...
    1,854 Words | 5 Pages
  • Essay Reproductive System - 432 Words
    Essay Reproductive system The reproductive system is a system of organs within an organism which work together for the purpose of reproduction. Hormones and pheromones are also important accessories to the reproductive system. The major organ of the reproductive system includes penis and vulva as well as a number of internal organs including the testicles and ovaries. Most other vertebrate animals have generally similar reproductive systems consisting of gonads, ducts, and openings. Human...
    432 Words | 2 Pages
  • Endocrine System - 473 Words
    Endocrine system The Endocrine system is very important to our body. This system regulates our mood, growth, metabolism, tissue development, sexual functions and reproductive process. It is a very complex system with many different hormones and glands. I am going to write about the pituitary gland and thyroid. The pituitary gland is very often considered to be the most important glad in the Endocrine system. The Thyroid produces thyroxine andtriiodothyronine. The Pituitary gland is no...
    473 Words | 2 Pages
  • A* psychology eating behaviour - 1306 Words
     Discuss Neural Mechanisms involved in the control of eating behaviours We eat in order to function and survive. When and how much we eat is largely determined by our metabolism (the rate at which the body uses energy). Several physiological mechanisms try to maintain this energy homeostasis (balance). The main area of the brain involved in the regulation of appetite is the hypothalamus.The hypothalamus regulates a number of important bodily functions, including eating behaviour, two...
    1,306 Words | 4 Pages
  • Anatomy & Physiology - Body Temp Fluctuations
    Q. A young hiker has been on a long walk. He is now sitting in front of a small campfire, drinking a hot cup of soup. It is dark and a frost is beginning to form on his tent. Explain the hiker’s heat gains and losses, and what mechanisms would come into effect to keep his temperature at the desired 37ºC. Humans are subject to vast changes in environmental temperatures, but our complex biochemical systems have a major limitation in that enzymes only operate within a relatively narrow...
    1,387 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Endocrine System (Part 1)
    The Endocrine System: 1. What is the Endocrine System? •The Endocrine System influences almost every cell, organ, and function of our bodies. •It is a collection of glands and organs that produce and regulate hormones in the bloodstream to control many bodily functions. •Whereas the nervous system responds to and controls body processes which occur quickly and last for a short amount of time, the endocrine system is responsible for many of the slow...
    1,149 Words | 7 Pages
  • Speech Being Nervous - 915 Words
    1. Your knees shake as you get out of your seat. Your stomach does somersaults; your hands start to quiver. Your ears become hot as you blush bright red, your voice wavers, you look at your feet and fidget you wish the floor would open up and engulf you in one big bite. Have you felt or done some or all of these nervous actions? Well you don’t need to worry anymore when you are next nervous. Maybe to your utter disbelief it is normal for your nerves to be in an uproar when you’re nervous....
    915 Words | 3 Pages
  • 3UU3 outline - 1640 Words
    BIOLOGY 3UU3 - Winter Term II - 2012 Animal Physiology: Regulatory Systems Instructor: C. David Rollo (rollocd@mcmaster.ca) Lectures: (rollocd@mcmaster.ca) Course Coordinator: Marvin Gunderman Wed. 5:30, BSB 147 (gundermn@mcmaster.ca) Teaching Assistants Chris DeJong Thur. 5:30, BSB 147 If the course is full, I cannot help you to get a seat. If the course is close to capacity I do not provide...
    1,640 Words | 8 Pages
  • Osmometric Thirst - 3132 Words
    Thirst is the craving for liquids, resulting in the basic instinct of humans or animals to drink. It is an essential mechanism involved in fluid balance. It arises from a lack of fluids and/or an increase in the concentration of certain osmolites such as salt. If the water volume of the body falls below a certain threshold, or the osmolite concentration becomes too high, the brain signals thirst. Continuous dehydration can cause a myriad of problems, but is most often associated with...
    3,132 Words | 9 Pages
  • structure of human body - 480 Words
    1. Thermoreceptors perceive the impact of heat on the part of human body and send signals through neurons to brain that causes the feeling of pain. If the signals fail to pass from thermoreceptors to brain, the risk of burning the part of the body arises. The pain is the indicator of the danger to human body and the ultimate manifestation of pain is a pain shock, which may be deadly for human body. 2. Olfaction is responsible for smell sense. Gustation is responsible for taste. They involve...
    480 Words | 2 Pages
  • Chapter 48 Nursing Assessment Endocrine System
    Chapter 48: Nursing Assessment: Endocrine System Test Bank MULTIPLE CHOICE 1. A 22-year-old patient is being seen in the clinic with increased secretion of the anterior pituitary hormones. The nurse would expect the laboratory results to show a. increased urinary cortisol. b. decreased serum thyroxine. c. elevated serum aldosterone levels. d. low urinary catecholamines excretion. ANS: A Increased secretion of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) by the anterior pituitary gland will lead to an...
    2,568 Words | 13 Pages
  • 132 Final - 2630 Words
    Part 1 of 15 - 6.67/ 8.335 Points Question 1 of 60 1.67/ 1.667 Points An organ that can be classified as both an endocrine and exocrine gland is the A. hypothalamus. B. thymus gland. C. gallbladder. D. pituitary gland. E. pancreas. Answer Key: E Feedback: Good job! Question 2 of 60 1.67/ 1.667 Points Hormones that bind to receptors inside of target cells are usually A. proteins. B. second messengers. C. lipid soluble. D. prohormones. E. water...
    2,630 Words | 15 Pages
  • MS Endocrine ASSIGNMENT 2
    MS – Endocrine System Assignment By: RLE 7.4 Siga-an, Patrice; Silva, Pauline; Simbulan, Paul; Simon, Chersea; Sison, Heidilene; Sitjar, Desiree; Sol Cruz, Lezrahmae; Songco, Francis; Soriano, Christian; Soriano, Joyce; Lim, Monica GLAND HORMONE HYPER HYPO PITUITARY Posterior Oxytocin Active uterine contractions Bleeding during labor Strong contractions Increased milk secretion Weak or uncoordinated contraction during labor Postpartum hemorrhage Uterine atony Fatigue Decreased milk...
    1,830 Words | 9 Pages
  • Endocrine Flow Chart - 658 Words
    ----------------------- Pituitary Gland (Hypophysis) Located in the hypophyseal fossa of the sella turcica of the sphenoid bone Function of melatonin: Coordinates body activities with sleep-wake cycles Anterior Pituitary (glandular tissues) Adenohypophysis Small cone shaped gland located in the roof of the third ventricle of the brain Pineal Gland Produces amine hormone melatoin Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) or thyrotropin...
    658 Words | 5 Pages
  • Hunger and the Fat Rat - 436 Words
    PsychSim 5: Hunger and the Fat Rat 53 PsychSim 5: HUNGER AND THE FAT RAT Section: 1 Date: Thursday, July 11, 2013 This activity provides a simulated experiment on weight regulation in rats. The Hypothalamus * What are the two techniques used to study hypothalamic dysfunction? How do they differ? The two techniques used to study hypothalamic dysfunction are stimulation and destruction. To simulate the hypothalamus a small wire probe is inserted...
    436 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Hormonal Mechanism of Love - 2939 Words
    Attachment, commitment, intimacy, passion, grief from separation, and jealousy are but a few of the emotionally-loaded terms used by Dianne Santorelli’s article for the educational research to describe that feeling of which love represents. On the contrary, Maskowitz and Orgel states in the book, General Psychology, that love, hate, fear , and anger are just some of the amazing varieties of feelings which appear to be related to the differential actions of the sympathetic and parasympathetic...
    2,939 Words | 9 Pages
  • Wernicke Encephalopathy and Korsakoff Syndrome
    Wernicke Encephalopathy and Korsakoff Syndrome Rasheema Douglas School Of New Resources Wernicke Encephalopathy and Korsakoff Syndrome Wernicke Encephalopathy and Korsakoff Syndrome are the acute and chronic stages of the same disease abbreviated as (WKS). (WKS) is a memory brain disorder that can result if there is a very low amount of Vitamin (B1) or Thiamine entering to the...
    332 Words | 2 Pages
  • Outline and Evaluate the Role of Neural Mechanisms in Eating Behaviour
    Outline and evaluate the role of neural mechanisms in eating behaviour AO1: One way in which eating behaviour is controlled is by a process called homeostasis. This involves mechanisms which both detect the state of the internal environment and also correct the situation to restore that environment to its optimal state. The body has evolved two separate systems, one for turning eating on and another for turning it off. Glucose levels play an important role in producing feelings of hunger....
    347 Words | 1 Page
  • The Effect of Social Support or Dislocation on Mental Health
    ‘The effect of social support or dislocation on mental health’ This essay will look at the effect of dislocation on mental health, what factors contribute to poor mental health from biological and psychosocial perspectives. We begin by looking at what factors promote positive mental health before looking at the role of social context and the environment in negating these very factors. We look at an example where the environment can make a negative contribution to mental health. Moving the...
    1,503 Words | 5 Pages
  • Stress and Coping - 1933 Words
    Stress and Coping Stress is the combination of physiological, psychological and behavioural effects when people are responding to any challenges or threatening situations. Long term stress reduced the capacity of our body to adapt. Stress influence conception, development and result of an illness. The source of stress has to change or adapt to balance our body system (Potter & Perry, 1997). Overton (2005) illustrates a good example that when our body is stressed due to the exposure...
    1,933 Words | 6 Pages
  • The potential sexual differentiation in the Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Neuron Count in the Rostral Preoptic Area of a Mouse.
    The potential sexual differentiation in the Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Neuron Count in the Rostral Preoptic Area of a Mouse. Abstract It is known that the HPG axis is sexually differentiated in GnRH neuron populations. In mice this is seen to be sexually differentiated in the secretary patterns of the synaptic projections instead of the cell count itself. This experiment proves that it is not the cell count of GnRH neurons that is sexually differentiated by conducting a single label...
    1,994 Words | 6 Pages
  • A&P 2 Final - 558 Words
    A&P 2; final exam III 1. _______ and _______ "bioactivate" thyroid hormone by removing a single "outer-ring" iodine atom. D1 and D2 2. _______ and the _______ regulate virtually all aspects of growth, development, and homeostasis pituitary; hypothalamus 3. _______ are a component of signal transduction cascades secondary messengers 4. _______ binds to specific call surface receptors that stimulate adenylate cyclase to produce cAMP TSH 5. _______ control growth and development...
    558 Words | 2 Pages
  • Hpa Axis - 423 Words
    Hypothalamic-Pituitary- Adrenal Axis Neurotransmitters The HPA axis is a complex set of direct influences and feedback interactions among the hypothalamus, the pituitary gland, and the adrenal glands. The interactions among these organs constitute a major part of the neuroendocrine system that controls reactions to stress and regulates many body processes, including digestion, the immune system, mood and emotions, sexuality, and energy storage and expenditure. Several monoamine...
    423 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Relationship Between the Nervous System and the Endocrine System
    The Relationship Between The Nervous System and The Endocrine System The cells and tissues in the body are delicate and easily disrupted. They will only be able to function well if all aspects of their chemical and physical environment is continuously adjusted to keep them stable and in equilibrium. The process in which several body systems work together to maintain the balanced environment is called homeostasis. The endocrine and nervous system work closely together to help maintain...
    1,347 Words | 4 Pages
  • Psych 105 - 995 Words
    Chronic Stressors: small stressors that can be ignored if they happen occasionally can accumulate to produce distress and illness. More psychological symptoms and physical symptoms have been reported, often have a greater and longer-lasting impact than major life events. Linked to particular environments. i.e. traffic Fight or Flight Suspected standing hairs to be the body’s first mobilization to any threat Brain activation in response to threat occurs in the hypothalamus, stimulating the...
    995 Words | 3 Pages
  • Discuss the effects of hormones - 867 Words
    How do hormones influence human behavior? (22 marks) Adrenaline comes along with a term called “fight or flight” it is used when the body is under stressful situations. It is an adaption the body human body has gone through to react to danger quickly. When under the adrenaline rush the body allows more oxygen into the lungs at a faster rate, it increases physical performance for a short period of time and there is a rush of blood to the main body organs that help deliver this quick reaction...
    867 Words | 3 Pages
  • Study Guide - 369 Words
    1. Receptors for touch, heat, pressure, vision, and hearing are classified as ___ because they sense stimuli that arise external to the body. 2. Color vision receptors are known as ________ . 3. The posterior pituitary gland secretes __ _ and ___ _. 4. The adult pineal gland is a small, shriveled remnant of the child's. True False 5. In the blood hydrophillic hormones are often bound to transport proteins. True False True False 6....
    369 Words | 4 Pages
  • Pituitary Gland - 1905 Words
    ------------------------------------------------- Pituitary gland From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Pituitary gland | | Located at the base of the brain, the pituitary gland is protected by a bony structure called the sella turcica of the sphenoid bone. | | Median sagittal through the hypophysis of an adult monkey. Semidiagrammatic. | Latin | hypophysis, glandula pituitaria | Gray's | subject #275 1275 | Artery | superior hypophyseal artery,infundibular artery,prechiasmal...
    1,905 Words | 10 Pages
  • Physioex Endocrine System - 1717 Words
    Lab 1 – Exercise 4: Endocrine System Name: Kathryn Marso ACTIVITY 1: Metabolism and Thyroid Hormone Part 1: Chart 1: Effects of Hormones on Metabolic Rate | | Normal Rat | Thyroidectomized Rat | Hypophysectomized Rat | BaselineWeightMl O2 used in 1 minuteMl O2 used per hourMetabolic ratePalpation results | 250.9 grams 7.1 ml 426 ml 1697 ml O2/kg/hr | 245.7 grams 6.2 ml 372 ml 1514 ml O2/kg/hr | 244.6...
    1,717 Words | 7 Pages
  • Pituitary Gland - 756 Words
    What to know about the Pituitary Gland Anatomy & Physiology II BIO144-1003B-06 It is interesting to find out about the pituitary glands in more detail. The pituitary glands are just one major part of the endocrine system. The pituitary glands secrete hormones to the bloodstream. It has two different categories, such as the anterior lobe and the posterior lobe. The anterior lobe secretes different hormones that are important to the human everyday life. Prolatin, growth hormone,...
    756 Words | 3 Pages
  • Hyper and Hypopituitarism - 2129 Words
    Hyper & Hypopituitarism Introduction Hyperpituitarism is the result of excess secretion of adenohypophyseal trophic hormones. Hypopituitarism is the decreased secretion of one or more of the pituitary hormones. If there is decreased secretion of most pituitary hormones, this condition is called panhypopituitarism (pan meaning "all"). Historical Background The pituitary was known by Galen, and various theories were proposed about its role in the body. In the late 19th century, acromegaly...
    2,129 Words | 9 Pages
  • Glands and Hormones - 411 Words
    Pituitary Anterior – Located in the base of the brain attached to the hypothalamus. Growth Hormone(GH) – Stimulates an increase in size and rate of division of body cells; enhances movement of amino acids through membranes; promotes growth of long bones. Prolactin (PRL) – Sustains milk production after birth; amplifies effect of LH in males. Thyroid-stimulating Hormone (TSH) – Controls secretion of hormones from the thyroid gland. Adrenocorticotropic Hormone (ACTH) – Controls secretion of...
    411 Words | 2 Pages
  • Role of the Pituitary Gland - 5876 Words
    BASIC CONCEPTS ENDOCRINE SYSTEM :- In physiology, the endocrine system is a system of glands, each of which secretes a type of hormone into the bloodstream to regulate the body. It derives from the Greek words endo meaning inside, within, and crinis for secrete. The endocrine system is an information signal system like the nervous system. Hormones are substances (chemical mediators) released from endocrine tissue into the bloodstream that attach to target tissue and allow communication among...
    5,876 Words | 22 Pages
  • Neurotransmitter Switching in Adult Brain
    Neurotransmitter Switching in Adult Brain According to one dogma of neuroscience, neurotransmitter population was thought to be fixed and immutable throughout life once developmental stages have passed. For over 100 years, a central assumption in the field of neuroscience has been that the brain of the adult mammals should remain structurally constant. New neurons, as well as new neurotransmitters were thought not to be added to the adult mammalian brain and that the production of new neurons...
    1,378 Words | 3 Pages
  • Understanding the Autonomic Nervous System
    * Difference in Somatic and Autonomic Nervous System * The somatic nervous system consists of nerves that provide VOLUNTARY control over skeletal muscles * The autonomic nervous system exerts INVOLUNTARY control over the contraction of smooth muscle, cardiac muscle, and glandular activity. * Basic function of the Sympathetic VS Parasympathetic Systems * Sympathetic system= “fight of flight” * Parasympathetic system= “rest and digest” * Both autonomic branches are...
    1,576 Words | 8 Pages
  • PsychSim 5 - 312 Words
    PsychSim 5: HUNGER AND THE FATRAT Date: 1/27/15 This activity provides a simulated experiment on weight regulation in rats. The Hypothalamus • What are the two techniques used to study hypothalamic dysfunction? How do they differ? The two techniques used to study hypothalamic dysfunction are stimulation and destruction. To simulate the hypothalamus a small wire probe is inserted into the hypothalamus and a weak but constant current is passed through its insulated tip. Generally, simulation...
    312 Words | 2 Pages
  • Endocrine vs. Nervous System
    Endocrine Vs Nervous System The endocrine system acts with nervous system to coordinate the body's activities. Both systems enable cells to communicate with others by using chemical messengers. The endocrine system uses chemical messengers called hormones that are transported by the circulatory system (blood). They act on target cells that may be anywhere in the body. The endocrine system is slower than the nervous system because hormones must travel through the circulatory system to reach...
    2,672 Words | 10 Pages
  • anatomy and physiology - 369 Words
    Anatomy & Physiology Name____________________________ Ch 10.1 SG (Endocrine Glands) 1. What does the endocrine system consist of? 2. What are hormones? 3. What do hormones influence? 4. How are hormones delivered from endocrine glands to their target organs? 5. Two categories of hormones are ________________ and __________________. 6. Why must insulin be injected, yet birth control hormones can be taken orally? 7. How does the control of hormone levels work...
    369 Words | 5 Pages
  • chapter 7 Human Physiology: An Integrated Approach
    Human Physiology An Integrated Approach, 6e (Silverthorn) Chapter 7 Introduction to the Endocrine System 1) Which of the following is NOT a method of hormone action A) control of enzymatic reaction rates B) control of ion or molecule transport across cell membranes C) control of electrical signaling pathways D) control of gene expression and protein synthesis E) All are methods of hormone action. Answer E Section Title The Classification of Hormones Learning Outcome 7.1 Skill Level I...
    4,836 Words | 13 Pages
  • How Hormones Effect the Metabolism
    How Hormones Effect the Endocrine System Introduction: The endocrine system primarily relies on the negative feedback mechanism. The endocrine system influences metabolic activities by sending out chemical messengers through the blood called hormones. Once released into the blood these hormones are transported throughout the body. The effects of these hormones are wide spread and vary from reproduction, growth and development, immunities, maintaining electrolyte levels, water and nutrient...
    917 Words | 4 Pages
  • Bio Review4 - 760 Words
    1. Know why hormones target specific target tissues. Each hormone acts only on a certain group of cells, called its target cells, because only the hormone’s target cells have the appropriate receptor to fit it. When a hormone binds to a receptor on its target cell, a change occurs within the cell. The cell may grow, divide, or change its metabolism in some way. All other cells of the body fail to respond to the hormone because they lack the appropriate receptor. 2. Know the function of the...
    760 Words | 6 Pages
  • Human Endocrine System - 973 Words
    Human Endocrine System A system of glands and cells that make hormones that are released directly into the blood and travel to tissues and organs all over the body. The endocrine system controls growth, sexual development, sleep, hunger, and the way the body uses food. [pic] The human endocrine system modulates several processes of the body by the function of hormones. The endocrine system secretes hormones that control how bodily functions work. Thus, the human endocrine system...
    973 Words | 4 Pages
  • Anatomy: Oxytocin - 295 Words
    Anatomy Report: OXYTOCIN Name: Yeqin Yan Period: first period Oxytocin Oxytocin: from the Greek “oxy”, meaning "quick," and tokos, meaning "childbirth". History: Oxytocin was discovered in 1909 when Sir Henry H. Dale found that an extract from the human posterior pituitary gland contracted the uterus of a pregnant cat. Definition: a hypothalamic hormone stored in the posterior pituitary, which has uterine-contracting and milk-releasing actions; it may also be prepared synthetically...
    295 Words | 2 Pages
  • Endocrinology - 2586 Words
    Janine Luker Student Identification: 22840848 June 27, 2009 Endocrinology Assignment/Personal Review and Summary Endocrinology is the study of hormones, the receptors in your body, and the signaling they give to release hormones in your body. The definition for endocrinology is defined in many different ways, but with all related meanings that sum up to the physiology of the endocrine glands. The endocrine system sends messages to the endocrine glands in your body that include the...
    2,586 Words | 7 Pages
  • Plato Hedoism - 409 Words
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  • Can You Sense Your Hormones
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  • Harmful Effects on Marijuana - 577 Words
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  • Biological Homosexuality - 275 Words
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  • Genetic Factors and Sleep - 994 Words
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