History of Australia Essays & Research Papers

Best History of Australia Essays

  • H&M Entering Australia
    Executive Summary Table of Contents Introduction – Hennes and Mauritz (H&M) was first established in 1947 and have since expanded internationally and currently operate in 34 countries (H&M, 2009). As H&M continues to expand every year, the following report has chosen Australia as the new market, where analysis has been conducted to provide H&M with recommendations of which market entry method they should adopt and the threats and issues they must overcome to be able to succeed. 1.0...
    2,788 Words | 9 Pages
  • Catholic Church in Australia - 486 Words
    1. Caroline ‘Jones’ Chisholm 2. Caroline Chisholm was born in May 30th 1808 in the English Country of Northampton shire and was born as Caroline Jones. Caroline Chisholm died in long illness on the 25th March 1877 in London. 3. Caroline Chisholm was known as ‘the Immigrants friend’ People described her as a Christian humanist. Caroline was inspired by the quote in the bible “Love Thy Neighbour”. She contributed to the church because she has followed one of many scriptures, “The alien who...
    486 Words | 2 Pages
  • Arnott's History - 334 Words
     Arnott’s – The Australian icon Arnott’s was founded by William Arnott in 1865 in Newcastle, Sydney. Growing demand lead to the opening of the first „William Arnott Steam Biscuit Factory“. Always intending to use fresh and local incredients, William Arnott bought 250 cows at that time to ensure the supply of fresh milk. In 1880 Arnott expanded to Sydney employing 300 people and launching new products like Milk Arrowroot biscuits. In 1880 Arnott’s daughter painted the famous company image...
    334 Words | 1 Page
  • Conscription in Australia During Ww1
    Many historians would say that Australia was a very united country in the effort to win World War I. But this has been debated many times, due to the fact that many Australian people were against war in itself and didn’t believe they should fight in a war that wasn’t even theirs. The onset of war had many negative effects on Australia and therefore it wasn’t as united as it should have been. The conscription debate also didn’t help unite the country. Both sides were substantially serious in...
    789 Words | 2 Pages
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  • The roaring twenties in Australia - 2962 Words
    Whether or not the term 'Roaring Twenties' is an adequate description of the character of Australian society from 1920 to 1929 depends on the circumstances of the Australian population in this decade, because 'Roaring' implies the 1920's were full of dramatic social changes, which may have came about from spontaneous economical or political incidences and new inventions. In the 1920s Australian politics was dominated by the conservative parties and, despite some industrial discontent and...
    2,962 Words | 8 Pages
  • A.D Hope Australia - 659 Words
    The poem Australia by A.D Hope is a juxtaposition of people's or societies view of Australia, versus the patriotic stance of the writer. It also shows how A.D Hope is trying to convey his perspective on the identity of Australia. A.D Hope reveals his discontentment and scathing tone on Australia’s identity through his descriptive imagery, “a Nation of trees, drab green and desolate grey,” where the sombre and bleak nature of Australia is divulged through the derogative language, “drab” and...
    659 Words | 2 Pages
  • Understanding Cultural Differences and Australia Culture
    Why is an understanding of cultural differences important to the business managers at BreadTalk? To assist the managers at BreadTalk to decide if they should expand to Australia, briefly describe the Australian culture. A wide range of definitions have been used for the term “culture.” Culture has been defined as the human-made part of the environment (Herkovits, 1955), including both objective and subjective elements (Triandis, 1972); as a set of reinforcements (Skinner, 1981); as the...
    636 Words | 2 Pages
  • Australian History Curriculum - 1654 Words
    Introduction History is the analysis and interpretation of the past events that enables us to study continuity and change over time. It is an act of both investigation and imagination that seeks to explain how people have changed over time (Harrison, n.d.). Meanwhile, in the Australia’s History Curriculum, it implements a meticulous course of investigations which helps equip and cultivate the student’s understanding through whatever queries and imagination about past events. It also advocates...
    1,654 Words | 5 Pages
  • How and Why Did Federation Occur in Australia?
    Federation for Australia was when six independant Brisitsh colonies were no longer divided. It was the year “1901” when Federation happened for Australia. Federation took place because of the need to be more organised, to improve the defence of Australia, better transportation, stronger communication, to unify the economy and to strengthen the pride of being Australian. The idea of six colonies uniting as one had an apeal to people which lead to motivating the spirit of Australia and being as...
    751 Words | 3 Pages
  • This film analysis is on the film "Ned Kelly" in the subject Australian Studies, which is compulsory is Australia. It answers questions on themes etc.
    (1) (i) The movie "Ned Kelly" is telling the audience about Australian history and that Australia is not a perfect country, but struggles with criminals as well. It also conveys racism, not against blacks, but against the Irish. This is now dispelled as Ned Kelly is known as the 'Australian hero', not the 'Irish Migrant of Australia hero'. The Kelly family were always the target of the soldiers' fun. Friendship is portrayed as being vital, as the gang of outlaws would not have been able to...
    1,460 Words | 5 Pages
  • Russel Ward, the Australian Legend - Book Review
    When writing the "big picture" histories, historians often overlook or exaggerate certain aspects of Australian history to make their point. Discuss with reference to one the recommended texts. The book "The Australian Legend", written by Russell Ward and published in 1958 speaks mainly of "Australian Identity". It looks at nationalism and what has formed our self-image. There are many aspects that are left overlooked however, as the Authour makes his assumptions. Significant parts of society...
    1,223 Words | 4 Pages
  • Feature Article on Aussie Stereo Types
    Ben Dansie explores how Australian made movies present false perceptions of Australian men. Have you ever watched an Australian made film and thought that you haven’t seen Australians behaving like that? Or you are not the typical Aussie Bloke being portrayed in the movie. In the movie Red Dog, a kelpie named Red, united and linked the community of an Australia outback mining town together. And, in uniting this small mining town also finds his true owner. In “Red Dog”, Australian blokes...
    737 Words | 2 Pages
  • working class man speech
    Working class man, written by Jonathan Cain, and performed by Jimmy Barnes, is a song which was produced in 1985, and has become an iconic song in Australian history. Its lyrics highlight the importance of the blue collar, working class stereotype which is evident in Australian society. The song tells the story, and also gives insight into the lives of the hard working stereotype. The two opening lines ‘work hard to make a living, bringing shelter from the rain’ already tell us of the kinds of...
    255 Words | 1 Page
  • Whistle Man Essay - 643 Words
    Whistle man written by Brian Ridden, is an entertaining book for teens that reflects the Australian identity in several ways. This is because it recaps real events, through the eyes of an ordinary orphan named Garret Clancy. Garrett does this by revealing how the characters, setting and plot during the 1870’s in Australia, represents the Australian identity. In this fabulous book, Ned is shown as a hero due to Garrett, though it doesn’t give enough evidence about the other side of him....
    643 Words | 2 Pages
  • How does Australian Drama stage a range of theatre involving an individuals experience
    “How does Australian drama and theatre stage a range of the different individual experiences found in Australian society” Living in a multicultural Australian society, the individuals affiliated have adopted the ability to witness its diverse nature through the vast experiences presented by the singular members. These broad affairs explore sections that depict Australia as vibrant but contrasting to this notion, would be the underlying incidences that exhibit the implementation of fear...
    2,746 Words | 8 Pages
  • Speech - Novel Cloudstreet - 891 Words
    [Salutations] Today I will be discussing how the Contemporary Australian novel Cloudstreet, by Tim Winton, is of value and how it is received in different contexts. I will firstly discuss how the novel is of value because of the presence of universal, timeless themes of: the search for a sense belonging and the importance of family. Being post-modern readers, we believe that the reception of a text depends on our context and value system. Consequently, a text can hold many interpretations. In...
    891 Words | 3 Pages
  • Bruce Dawe, Life Cycle Speech.
    English Speech [Reading of Life Cycle] That poem, written by Bruce Dawe, conveys the idea that AFL is 'the way of life' and is as important of religion to Victorian people. 
 Good morning/afternoon to my fellow Class mates and Mrs Daniels. As you know, my name is Sophie and I strongly believe that the poem “Life Cycle” is a poem that should be included as a representation of the Australian experience. Within this poem Dawe refers to Australian history and also a variety of influences that...
    879 Words | 3 Pages
  • Australian Identity - 838 Words
    Australia is a country that has been described as diverse, multicultural and unique. Our geography, flora, fauna and cultural history are different to anywhere else, which has definitely captured the attention of the rest of the world. Australian society has evolved in a very short space of time from the earliest convict settlements established in the mid nineteenth century, to the cosmopolitan states that currently exist and attract immigrants from all continents across the globe. Australia’s...
    838 Words | 2 Pages
  • Australian National Identity - 1912 Words
    Identify and discuss the nature of national identity in Australia. How has/have national identify/ies been portrayed and maintained and which groups have been excluded? The nature of Australian’s national identity has been an ongoing debate for many years. It involves how Australians see themselves, and how other countries view Australia as a whole. Throughout the country’s history, the national identity has not remained constant, and currently it is a debate to what Australian’s true...
    1,912 Words | 6 Pages
  • qwerty - 3841 Words
    Aboriginal Australians have fought to retain their pride but still are treated unfairly within today’s society. The poem “The Black Drunkard” by Kevin Gilbert and the song “from little things big things grow’” by Paul Kelly exposes the impact that society has left on the aboriginal race. The ballad “The Black Drunkard” By Kevin Gilbert uses many different poetic devises to capture the concept of a man who has been disjointed with his cultural identity. Within these quatrains Gilbert uses...
    3,841 Words | 10 Pages
  • Australian Urbanisation Early 1900's
    The process of urbanisation is a central feature of Australian history. By 1900 over two-thirds of Australians were living in areas that were classified as urban. The growth of these cities was encouraged by various factors; the interaction and engagement of economic, demographic, political and social characteristics are definitely the key features that promoted the urbanisation of Australia. However, with the development of Australia came problems that people living in cities had to face....
    2,345 Words | 7 Pages
  • Charity and the Media - an Australian Context
    | Charity and the Media | An Australian Example | | Aidan Simmons, Bachelor of Journalism/Arts | 3655477 | “There are an estimated 600,000 entities in the not-for-profit sector which contribute around $43 billion to the economy of Australia making it larger than the communications industry, agriculture or tourism. The majority of these are small unincorporated neighbourhood groups or associations that provide support for and wellbeing in the community”. – Office of the Not for...
    5,430 Words | 16 Pages
  • Prison and Fleet Convict Database
    First Fleet Convict Database Answer the following questions! 1. Check to see if any convicts with your surname were transported on the first fleet. A - None of my family was. 2. What did Joshua Taylor steal that saw him sentenced to transportation? A - for stealing a handkerchief. 3. How old was Elizabeth Beckford when she was transported? A – 70 4. What was unusual about John McIntire? A – That he was allowed to carry a gun. 5. What was Martha Kennedy do for a living before being...
    430 Words | 2 Pages
  • Away and Other Related Text Essay. (Yr 11 Standard)
    Australian voices: I am, you are, hold on! What is an Australian? An Australian voice? What can an Australian voice be? To many the definition of an Australian voice will vary from opinion to opinion. One can describe an Australian voice as being a perspective of the Australian culture in relations to Australian values ideas, attitudes and actions. To many it may be how a typical Australian is perceived by the rest of the world, and the differences between their own culture and that of...
    1,083 Words | 3 Pages
  • Exhibition Design - 2069 Words
    Being a successful designer means that having an excellent way of communicating design is a must, one of the perfect way in communicating design or art works in any scale is by conducting an exhibition. Depending on the contents and contexts, an exhibition can consists of smaller exhibitions that are often related to each other in some way. Modern exhibitions includes art, photography, design, products, fashion and so on, exhibition is often not limited to a certain category but rather a...
    2,069 Words | 6 Pages
  • Essay Starters for Jack Davis's No Sugar
    No Sugar Essay Starters Sheradyn – Drama Essay ~ No sugar (Jack Davis) The play No Sugar by Jack Davis has various themes and issues covered in it. Understanding of society helps with the meaning of this text, through multiple aspects. These are shown in the text through various themes/issues. These themes NO SUGAR (JACK DAVIS) Jack Davis’ “No Sugar”, written in 1985, is a play that highlights Australian racism and cultural destruction caused by British colonialism. It is set in 1929 (Great...
    433 Words | 2 Pages
  • My Country and No More Boomerang
    ‘My Country’ and ‘No More Boomerang.’ Two of Australia’s most influential and intriguing poems known for enlightening readers about the vast changes throughout Australian history as well as portraying the Australian voices that experienced this transformational era. The composers, Dorothea Mackellar and Oodegroo Noonuccal, have successfully introduced us to important ideas about the people and the world in which they live through the use of various techniques and poetic devices. The sense of...
    614 Words | 2 Pages
  • Stolen Generation Essay - 426 Words
    The discovery of Australia by the English on January 26th 1788 was a terrific day for the aboriginals. White settlement meant the colonization of Australia. Education is one of the main things in life and if you don’t have that you’re going to end up on the street. That’s where white settlement comes in, The British built schools for most aboriginal children, they tough them how to eat properly, speak English, math’s and how to build things. Health is a main necessity in life and if you...
    426 Words | 2 Pages
  • Top Personal Trainers Listed in New Australian Website Launch
    PressReleasePing Top Personal Trainers Listed in New Australian Website Launch Toppersonaltrainers.com.au is a personal trainer review directory set up by Sydney Based Ztue Marketing. It is independently managed and has no conflict of interest with any personal trainer featured. It is part of the portfolio of Australian review websites that Ztue Marketing own and manage. Sydney, NSW, Australia, August 30, 2014 /PressReleasePing/ - Mr Tony Adams, founder of Ztue Marketing is pleased to...
    425 Words | 3 Pages
  • Rabbit Proof Fence - 511 Words
    Rabbit Proof Fence An Australian film Rabbit Proof Fence directed by Philip Noyce is reliable to an historian studying the Protection policies of the Australian Government during the 1930's in that it tells a true story about three Aboriginal children who were taken away from their families because they were half-castes. However, it is not reliable in that it only tells us about the effect of Protection policy in Western Australia, not the whole country. This film outlines the...
    511 Words | 2 Pages
  • Paul Keating Analysis - 2020 Words
    Speech 1: Everyman and Egalitarianism: Australia’s war history: Paul Keating Keating Speech View clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eNSc_2nmylA Paul Keating Speech Annotation Explores Keating’s context, Watson’s role and debate about the ownership of a speech. Also a recording of the speech runs over images of Keating. A eulogy delivered by the Prime Minister, The Hon. P. J. Keating MP, at the funeral service of the Unknown Australian Soldier, 11 November 1993 grows with each passing...
    2,020 Words | 7 Pages
  • How Does Kate Grenville’s Novel, the Secret River, Complicate Simplistic Views of the Colonial Situation?
    How does Kate Grenville’s novel, The Secret River, complicate simplistic views of the colonial situation? To some extent the past generations have been reared on a patriotic view of past Australian history, interpreting its history as largely a success. Since history is determined by the perspective of from which it is written, this version of Australian history, the Three Cheers view, was written from the perspective of white working-class males, who consider Australian pioneers to be the...
    2,759 Words | 8 Pages
  • Write an Essay on the Cultural Differences Between Afghan and Australian Society.
    Afghan and Australian cultures differ from each other to quite an extent. They can be thought of as opposite sides of a coin which share no direct similarities or are in any way related. The Australian view of correct etiquette and decorum contrasts significantly with that of the Afghan society which is based and derived from their religion, Islam. Religion is the major reason for the incompatibility between Afghan and Australian cultures. In Afghanistan all decisions are dominated by...
    418 Words | 2 Pages
  • Margaret Preston - 524 Words
    Margaret Preston was a dynamic, unique Australian artist born on the 29th of April 1875 in Adelaide. She is renowned for her bold artworks, and through them, she showed her ongoing passion to establish a national identity. What were the different experiences for your individual? She began to take interest in art after an influential trip to the Art Gallery of NSW with her mother when she was 12, , continuing her new-found passion in Chinese painting through private classes with William...
    524 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Last Outlaw: Ned Kelly as Australian Icon
    The Last Outlaw: Ned Kelly as Australian Icon By: Rynatha Vietadiella P. 121012096 English Department, Faculty of Humanities ------------------------------------------------- Airlangga University ------------------------------------------------- Introduction Every nation must have a historical figure of the hero which is attached as their identity. Usually they are figures which opponents of the law arbitrary, defender of the oppressed, close by the poor. The most memorable of them, of...
    3,144 Words | 8 Pages
  • gold rush - 533 Words
    Today I’ll be talking to you about Ned Kelly and my topic is weather he was a villain or hero. His full name is actually Edward Kelly but most people know him by his nick name which of course is Ned Kelly. Ned was an Australian Bush ranger. He was born in Victoria in June 1854 but has a strong Irish background due to his Irish convict father. As a young man he clashed with the Victoria Police. Following an incident at his home in 1878, police parties searched for him in the bush. After he and...
    533 Words | 2 Pages
  • Female Convicts - 295 Words
    The year 1788 was marked as a very important year in the entire History of Australia. It was the year the first fleet of convicts arrived in australia at Botonay Bay from the terrible and putrid conditions in London. The ships had both men and women onboard but the majority of them were males. The females of the colonies were often regarded as less than human hence them being treated in such a manor. They were seen as the breeders of the colonies and their punishments were aimed for...
    295 Words | 1 Page
  • Were All Australian Now Poem Analysis
    "We're all Australian now" poem analysis Good morning/Good afternoon boys and girls aboriginal elders and Mrs. Brown Andrew Barton "Banjo" Paterson (17 February 1864 – 5 February 1941) was an Australian bush poet, journalist and author. He wrote many ballads and poems about Australian life, focusing particularly on the rural and outback areas, including the district around Bin-along, New South Wales, where he spent much of his childhood. Banjo Paterson’s, ‘We’re all Australians now’ was...
    696 Words | 3 Pages
  • Australian Identity Through Poetry.
    The Australian identity is as diverse as the country itself. Each and every Australian has a unique perception of Australia, yet there is also a common awareness of Australia as a whole. The Australian identity also concerns the way Australians are viewed by other people. There are many different aspects to this identity, which include historical icons, such as bushrangers and convicts, and more recent developments in Australia, such as the surfing culture, and even our language, which has been...
    914 Words | 3 Pages
  • Racism and True Australian Identity
    Hurdle Task 2 - The True Australian Identity Australia is a country that has been described as diverse, multicultural and unique. Our geography, flora and fauna and cultural history are different to anywhere else, which has definitely captured the attention of the rest of the world. Australian society has evolved in a very short space of time from the earliest convict settlements established in the mid 19thcentury, to the cosmopolitan states that currently exist and attract immigrants from all...
    5,119 Words | 13 Pages
  • Keating speech notes - 1675 Words
    Annotation of techniques Para 1: Inclusive language. Emphatic diction – “never” Para 2: Repetition Emphatic diction Para 3: Repetition Statistics Para 4: Inclusive language. Metonymy Para 5: Simile. Dramatic language Para 6: Dramatic pause, using conjunction Para 7: Emotive language. Contrast. Cliché Para 8: Dramatic pause using conjunction. Paradox Para 9: Juxtapositions of antithetical opposites (eg. war/peace, soldier/civilian). Universal language Para 10: Juxtapositions of...
    1,675 Words | 6 Pages
  • Clancy of the Overflow vs in Town by Dyson
    Australia in the late 20th century, was an important period when intelligentsia were seeking to define its nation and its national identity. One powerful communicator was in the writings and articles published in popular newspapers, which offered differing ideas and approaches on this subject. In this essay I aim to analyse two documents in the form of ballads that were published in this period, and to describe how they played a part in constructing an image that could be used to define the...
    1,417 Words | 4 Pages
  • spoohv - 54337 Words
    TH E STATU S OF SPORT I N R U R AL AN D REGIONAL AU STRALIA: LITERATU RE, RESEARCH AND POLICY OPTIONS DR STEPH EN M U GFORD (QUALITATIV E & QUANTITATIV E SOCIAL RESEARCH) FOR SPORTS I N DU STRY AU STRALI A JAN 2001 TABLE OF CON TEN TS E xecuti ve Summa ry PART 1: LEARNING F ROM THE LITERATURE 1: Sport a nd I denti ty: A Revi ew o f the Literature 2: Change in Rura l Communiti es in Australia PART 2: RESE ARCH 3: The Survey Findi ngs from the Fa rm wide websi te 4: Li...
    54,337 Words | 245 Pages
  • Australian Identity Essay - 1003 Words
    The Australian identity has in fact a number of identities competing to be the true Australian national identity. The two main parts of this competition is the bush legend and the beach and suburbs. However it should not be thought that either of these parts is a completely set idea and image of Australia. This essay will argue that the Australian identity to a great extent is now based on ideas and images that relate to the beach and suburbs rather than the bush. Although it is important to...
    1,003 Words | 3 Pages