Hip hop Essays & Research Papers

Best Hip hop Essays

  • Hip Hop - 1613 Words
    Alex Williams October 29, 2012 Professor Marini Research Paper; 12pm Hip Hop Phenomenon Barack Obama once stated, “The thing about hip-hop today is it's smart, it's insightful. The way they can communicate a complex message in a very short space is remarkable (Morgan 927).” Hip Hop has evolved through the years by the people who participate in it. The message in the lyrics that hip hop artist speak are usually directed to the youth community. Hip Hop is spread throughout the world. Hip...
    1,613 Words | 5 Pages
  • Hip Hop - 984 Words
    Jonathon Bidelspach AFA 2000 Unit IV Paper Hip-hop music is known as one of the most popularizing and popular genres in our modern society. Most of hip-hop music is considered vulgar, offensive, and meaningless, which can be easily displayed by hip-hop artists such as Soulja Boy and Lil’ Wayne. However, who gets lost in translation is the artist who conveys true meaning in their lyrics and sticks with the original roots of the music. For hip-hop’s short life, there has been dramatic change...
    984 Words | 3 Pages
  • Hip Hop - 8059 Words
    Hip Hop Hip hop is a broad conglomerate of artistic forms that originated as a specific street subculture within South Bronx communities during the 1970s in New York City. It is characterized by four distinct elements, all of which represent the different manifestations of the culture: rap music (aural), turntablism or "DJing" (aural), breaking (physical) and graffiti art (visual). Despite their contrasting methods of execution, they find unity in their common association to the poverty and...
    8,059 Words | 21 Pages
  • Hip Hop - 1008 Words
    Inside Out Hip-hop WORKSHEET A Jo For many people hip-hop is synonymous with rap music, but I’d say it refers to a whole subculture that emerged with rap in the United States – especially New York – in the late 1970s and has since become truly international. Rapping (or ‘MCing’) and DJing are the two main components of hip-hop music. Maybe you could describe rap as a form of expression that is somewhere between speech, poetry and song. Other parts of hip-hop culture are specific styles of...
    1,008 Words | 4 Pages
  • All Hip hop Essays

  • Hip hop - 407 Words
    Hip Hop is a category of “music” that has come a long way since it was first fashioned. Born in The Bronx, New York is has defined and interpreted countless of times. The text book definition is “a style of popular music of US black and Hispanic origin, featuring rap with an electronic backing. Originally produce to tell stories of men and women of the time it has since grown and develop a whole new meaning which is not set in stone. Today, hip-hop, can be located worldwide due largely to media...
    407 Words | 1 Page
  • Hip Hop - 470 Words
     Back then, when I hear “Hip Hop”, I associated it with egoistic rappers and gang violence. It was my least favorite music genre because rap artists only rap about their shopping list and other meaningless topics. It came to the point where I asked, “What is Hip Hop?” I was so curious that I decided to use it as an English research topic. From that point on, my opinion on Hip Hop changed completely due to the fact that there’s more to it. As I researched on what Hip Hop is, I found out that...
    470 Words | 2 Pages
  • Hip Hop - 2091 Words
    Music has been around since the beginning of civilization. Music was used to tell myths, religious stories, and warrior tales. Since the beginning of civilization music has greatly progressed. Music still tells a story, we know just have many genres to satisfy the cultural and social tastes of our modern society. Hip Hop is a genre of music that has significantly grown the last couple of decades. It's increased popularity has brought it to the forefront of globalization. Technological advances...
    2,091 Words | 5 Pages
  • Hip Hop - 3407 Words
    HIP HOP'S AFFECT ON CULTURE Hip hop has permeated popular culture in an unprecedented fashion. Because of its crossover appeal, it is a great unifier of diverse populations. Although created by black youth on the streets, hip hop's influence has become well received by a number of different races in this country. A large number of the rap and hip hop audience is non-black. It has gone from the fringes, to the suburbs, and into the corporate boardrooms. Because it has become the fastest...
    3,407 Words | 9 Pages
  • Hip Hop - 3879 Words
    Hip hop was first used by Africa Bambatta (Godfather of Hip-Hop culture, Father of the Electro Funk sound, founder of the Universal Zulu Nation, visionary, historian, and the Master of Records) back in the early 80’s to describe the culture which incorporates: Break dancing, Djing (cuttin' and scratching) , Emceeing (rapping), and Graffing. Before that the word hip hop referred to a phrase that MC’s said on the mic. Hip hop is a lifestyle with its own language, dress, music and way of thinking...
    3,879 Words | 9 Pages
  • Hip Hop - 1034 Words
    Hip Hop In the 1990’s hip hop culture went through major changes. Hip hop which originally started in the South Bronx as a street born cultural movement transformed into much more. There are four types also known as the pillars of hip hop, DJ-ing,MC-ing, ( also know as rapping ), break dancing, and graffiti. All of that pretty much faded away with the 90’s and rap was left to take control. Rap in the 1980’s was thought to be a force, until MC hammer,Tupac, and Biggie Smalls took over the...
    1,034 Words | 3 Pages
  • Hip Hop - 2167 Words
    Hip Hop: The Movement and the Social Challenge Hip hop is a musical culture that has undergone rapid development and transformation since its origins during the 1970s in New York City. (I would consider rewording first sentence. The last part of the sentence should maybe be shortened and put at the beginning) What started off first as a relatively underground culture, has rapidly led to a major entertainment industry that has become largely commercialized within mainstream popular culture. (A...
    2,167 Words | 6 Pages
  • hip hop - 277 Words
    Pg.1 Hip Hop and R&B Draft Monique Gee 4/13/2014 Com/155 Daniella Bianchi-Laubsch Pg.2 Since the beginning of time music has been a major inspiration to most people. Music helps us to come through some of the toughest times in our lives as well as celebrating the highlights of our lives. There is not just one music genre that moves or inspires us most people are ecletic in a music sense. Although, different music genres evolve from others...
    277 Words | 1 Page
  • Cultural Impact of Hip Hop
    The Cultural Impact of Hip Hop Music The Main Impact of Hip-hop music is on the Kids of today. The music, slang and clothing are a couple of examples of heavy influences. Why can't they be more like ... actually kids today are pretty much the same are their parents and grandparents were when it comes to creating their own culture. Only now, instead of flappers, hippies or punks, we've got a generation of youths influenced by hip-hop culture. It's hard to argue that the current domination...
    1,095 Words | 4 Pages
  • HIP HOP MUSIC - 318 Words
    “I love hip hop music.” Hip hop to me is a mixture of both R&B and rap music. There are times when I maybe in the mood to listen to rap or r&b but I’m always in the mood to listen to Hip hop. My worst days can become my best days when I’m jamming to hip hop music. There’s just something about that particular style of music that makes me and keeps me happy no matter what is going on. It also supplies me with energy and motivation. Hip hop music makes my daily life easier and is in fact my...
    318 Words | 1 Page
  • Misogyny: Hip Hop Artists
    Pardon the pun, but when it comes to degrading and sexist representations of women in music, does hip hop deserve its bad rap? Almost exclusively blamed for the negative images of women in music videos, hip hop is often perceived as unforgivingly misogynistic. In hip hop and rap, many of the lyrics and images portray women of all ethnicities as sexual objects and depict the exploitation of and violence against women. The image of dozens of semi-naked women dancing provocatively around one...
    1,111 Words | 3 Pages
  • Gangs and Hip-Hop - 1257 Words
    In an atmosphere dominated by gang activity, it is evident that the most popular way of seeking freedom from this harsh environment of drugs and violence is self-expression through the popular culture of hip-hop. Whether it is dance, music, or even the fashion aspect of hip-hop, it seems to be the most common escape from such rough surroundings. It is also very apparent that many of these escapees actually make a living out of indulging themselves in the hospitable culture of hip-hop. In fact,...
    1,257 Words | 4 Pages
  • Roots of Hip Hop - 968 Words
     “The Roots and Stylistic Foundations of the Rap Music and Tradition” Hip-Hop as well as many other artistic cultural forms we practice today can be related back to African culture and various traditions. Author of The Roots and Stylistic Foundations of the Rap Music and Tradition, Cheryl Keyes, discuss’ the spirit, style, tradition, emotions, culture and the delivery of music. Keyes says that many of these practices can be traced back to the West Afrikan Bardic Tradition in particular....
    968 Words | 3 Pages
  • Women's Image in Hip Hop
    Women, namely African American, have played a crucial role in Hip Hop culture: from the beginning with Cindy Campbell the sister of Kool Herc — who demonstrated her entrepreneurship of promoting his block parties; the idea of entrepreneurship is still deeply seeded in Hip Hop today—to Debra Lee, the president and CEO of BET. However, accounts of hip hop often downplay, or completely leave out, the contributions of women to hip hop as artist, entrepreneurs, producers, writers, etc. Women have...
    3,372 Words | 8 Pages
  • Hip Hop Nationalism - 938 Words
    Jason Chanthorn Christopher y West African American History from 1865 Journal Article- The State of Rap: Time and Place Hip hop is a form of art that has been popular for the past twenty years. Although people in recent years often mistake rap music as vulgar and ill-mannered, the hip hop community continues to provide a great way to channel emotion and soul into their music. In his article, “The State of Rap: Time and Place” Jeffrey Louis Decker illustrates the black nationalism within...
    938 Words | 3 Pages
  • Hip Hop Dance - 576 Words
    What’s your favorite dance style? For me, I love to dance! It is my favorite thing to do. Hip-Hop dance is the most I like. If you can do the moves in hip hop, you will be more flexible for those other kind of dance such as ballet. It is a lot of fun, and you can look “bad” and scare people away by dancing. There are various other popular dance styles used with hip-hop dance, which include breaking, popping and locking. Breaking is a kind of street dance. It is also dances by people who are...
    576 Words | 2 Pages
  • Politics and Hip-Hop - 802 Words
    Music is an art form and source of power. Many forms of music reflect culture and society, as well as, containing political content and social message. Music as social change has been highlighted throughout the 20th century. In the 1960s the United States saw political and socially oriented folk music discussing the Vietnam War and other social issues. In Jamaica during the 1970s and 1980s reggae developed out of the Ghetto’s of Trench town and expressed the social unrest of the poor and the...
    802 Words | 2 Pages
  • Hip-Hop: A New Generation
    Hip-Hop: A New Generation Hip-hop was born out of the Bronx during the 1970s. Artists such as Grandmaster Flash, DJ Kool Herc and Afrika Bambaata mixed funk, soul and Jamaican "toasting" (chanting over music) to create a type of hip-hop. Since its early formation, hip-hop has become one of the world’s biggest-selling musical genres. Its influence on Western society is far reaching and hip-hop is often referred to as a "culture". Hip-Hop has had a notable influence on fashion, language, art...
    681 Words | 2 Pages
  • Tattoos and Hip-Hop (Sociology)
    Hip-hop music and tattoos are important to many teenagers of society today because these are forms of self expression. Although, these forms of expression, along with any form of expression, convey positive and negative message because as people, we have positive and negative emotions. Why are these forms of expression so popular in teens? And why is it mostly teens?We should pay close attention to the negative effects of these cultural trends because it shapes the the people of today, the...
    845 Words | 2 Pages
  • In Defense of Hip hop - 946 Words
    “In Defense of Hip-Hop” The article “In Defense of Hip-Hop” was an article written by Cathleen Rountree. Rountree claims hip-hop is unfairly made the scape goat of violent words and acts by Congress and other “bastions of self-righteousness” (para.1). Rountree uses comparison by comparing the way some individual claim “Hip Hop made me do it” to a popular phrase by Flip Wilson, “The Devil made me do it!” Rountree also utilizes her personal experiences by stating the documenting “Tupac...
    946 Words | 3 Pages
  • Hip Hop and the Crack Epidemic
    It was during the mid-1980s that the emergence of a new smokable form of cocaine, called crack, had been introduced to the United States. Crack, was highly-addictive and swept through impoverished areas of cities such as New York, Los Angeles, Oakland, and Miami. In the end it caused devastating effects for black and Latino Americans. As crack cocaine was becoming a grim and rising epidemic, hip hop was evolving alongside it. It was in the 1980s that crack cocaine and hip hop became the two...
    1,688 Words | 4 Pages
  • Rap and Hip Hop Culture
    Thomas Runyan Comparison Paragraph Dr. Andrews Mar 22, 2011 Hip Hop and its Rap Culture counterpart comparison It was 1977, and the Summer of Sam was in full swing in New York. But in the neighborhoods and housing projects of the “boogie down” Bronx New York, a new art form was developing called Hip Hop. This new art form would change America and transcend a generation forever with its influences on fashion, music, and lifestyle. Hip Hop is an urban lifestyle that consists of different...
    360 Words | 1 Page
  • essay on hip hop - 1511 Words
    English 101 September 11, 2013 For the love of Music Everyone expresses themselves in a variety of ways getting lost in their own world only to be understood by them, this lost realm in which people enter is very vague, there isn’t much to it but the feelings and emotions brought upon by the music. Certain songs or artists/bands seem to strike very emotional ties with many people and that includes me, but idea of what music is undefined. Music doesn’t take shape or size but it...
    1,511 Words | 4 Pages
  • Hip Hop Never Stops
    Music is a language understood all over through its rhythm and the feeling it can give a person. It defines personality and demonstrates emotions better than any other means of expression. Hip-Hop gives adolescents a way to escape from problems and troubles of their lives and articulate their emotions through dance, rapping, beat boxing, DJing and graffiti. Hip-Hop is more than just a genre that most people don’t understand. It is a civil movement of the public conveying who they are and what is...
    1,369 Words | 3 Pages
  • Hip Hop Planet - 2875 Words
    For as long as mankind has walked on this earth, music has been an important part of our culture and lifestyles. Each walk of life beats to a different drum. Different cultures use music for many aspects of their lives; for religious purposes, for celebrations, for comfort, for sorrow, for relaxation, for sports, for dances, for energy, for learning, for sleeping, and for sexual experiences. Everyone uses music for something. Music connects with people and reaches them in ways that words...
    2,875 Words | 7 Pages
  • Effects of Hip Hop Music
    TOPIC: Effects of hip hop music on Daystar university students THESIS: Hip hop music has a negative effect on Daystar University students THESIS STATEMENT: Although a source of revenue, form of political and social awareness and a form of breaking down cultural barriers, hip hop Music has negative effects on Daystar University students such as, it affects their language, men’s world view towards women, and the student’s world view towards luxury, money and drugs / drug abuse and it also...
    2,485 Words | 7 Pages
  • Hip Hop Influence - 434 Words
    Why you should listen to Hip-Hop music There are many different genres of music available to listen to. Hip-Hop music has gotten a bad rap from the beginning, no pun intended. Good music should evoke some type of emotion from the listener. In hip-hop the artist attempts to paint a picture for the listener by telling a story through spoken word over a beat. Sure some of the lyrics may be raunchy and even destructive, however just like a motion picture director that tells a story through a...
    434 Words | 2 Pages
  • Hip Hop: A Misconception
    Hip Hop: A Misconception The year is 1973. The location is 1520 Sedgwick Avenue, South Bronx, New York City, New York. Clive Campbell, also known as DJ Kool Herc, is using two turntables and various R&B and funk records to mix percussion beats and create breaks, while others are dancing and speaking rhythmically to the beat. This is the birth of the hip hop. The art that is hip hop would quickly become a worldwide anomaly, and rather than fade away as swiftly as it grew like many...
    3,707 Words | 9 Pages
  • Communication and Culture - Hip Hop
    Use your knowledge of selected theoretical perspectives and key concepts to evaluate the views about hip hop expressed here. (40 marks) Hip hop marks a significant change in society. It represents the expression of disenfranchised young people originally from the Bronx. However what argument A tries to express is that hip hop is slowly loosing its value and significance looking from a Marxist point of view. Hip hop had many values associated with its subculture, values were based on there life...
    484 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Effects of Hip Hop Music
    The Effects of Hip Hop Music on Today's Youth If a person was born anywhere between the 1980's to the 1990's, he or she is considered a part of the "Hip Hop Generation". Music is a gift that has been given to us, but the question is, "where is hip hop music going?" Hip-hop is now one of the biggest and fastest growing businesses in the world. It's creativity in sound, and its lyrics have impressed and empowered many of today's youth. But is hip-hop music taking today's youths where they need...
    659 Words | 2 Pages
  • Hip Hop in History - 3436 Words
    Introduction: Hip Hop in History: Past, Present, and Future Author(s): Derrick P. Alridge and James B. Stewart Source: The Journal of African American History, Vol. 90, No. 3, The History of Hip Hop (Summer, 2005), pp. 190-195 Published by: Association for the Study of African-American Life and History, Inc. Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20063997 Accessed: 27/10/2009 14:22 Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of JSTOR's Terms and Conditions of Use, available...
    3,436 Words | 53 Pages
  • Hip Hop and Black Women
    Reflection II Today's society is heavily impacted by the music world. Music has a way with influencing its listeners, and many may argue that for some music types, this is a bad thing, especially for black women. Even with many new genres arising from the contemporary music scene , hip-hop has maintained it's leading popularity. In Jennifer McLune's “Hip-Hop's Betrayal of Black Women”, Hip-Hop is portrayed as a negative contender in the advocacy of female activism. Through the argument in...
    529 Words | 2 Pages
  • Hip Hop in Society - 3523 Words
    Introduction Music has an immense impact on todays society, and now that hip hop is one of the most listened to genres, hip hop artist including rappers have a venue where they can vent and show the emotions that they are feeling. According to Tia C.M. Tyree in the article Lovin Momma & Hatin' on Baby Mama; Rap is an avenue used by some Black men to express a variety of emotions, feelings and ideas; hope, frustration, anger, love and misogyny. What is being focused on is the misogynistic...
    3,523 Words | 9 Pages
  • Masculinity in Rap and Hip Hop
    Tasia Walker Masculinity in Rap and Hip Hop Today in Hip Hop every rapper has to portray themselves as being hard, having a lot of girls in their circle and having money. Since the beginning of the American society being considered a real man was to be able to protect their families. When television came around western films portrayed men as either strong or weak and defined their masculinity as being the stronger man because of their guns. For...
    620 Words | 2 Pages
  • The history of Hip-Hop - 619 Words
    The history of hip-hop originated in the late 60th of the 20th century and continues to grow in the present day. Hip hop music first emerged with disc jockeys creating rhythmic beats by looping breaks on two turntables. This was later known as rap, a rhythmic style of chanting or poetry presented in 16 bar measures or time frames. Hip hop is a form of musical expression and artistic subculture that originated in African American and Hispanic American communities during the 1970s in New York...
    619 Words | 2 Pages
  • Hip Hop as a Cultural Movement
    Anson Wong WRI 1200 Prof. Patrice Wilson May 14, 2010 Hip-hop as a Cultural Movement What first comes to mind nowadays when you hear the word ‘hip-hop’? Most people think of a gangster embellished in large diamonds, sporting baggy clothes, huge cars, all with a general disregard for the welfare of humanity. It wasn’t always like this: hip-hop was originally born as a recreational activity, used as an outlet to cope with poverty. The notion of hip-hop has clearly changed in a big way...
    2,620 Words | 7 Pages
  • Hip Hop Goes Global
    Hip-Hop Goes Global It has been a quarter of a century since hip-hop first made its mark on the American music scene. Hip-hop has become a popular trend that is echoing around the world. By definition, hip-hop refers to a culture that embraces a particular music, language, attitude, and dress fashioned after disadvantaged urban youth. Born out of the ghettos of the South Bronx, New York, and created by black and Latino youth in the late 1970's and early 1980's, this music genre closely...
    929 Words | 3 Pages
  • Hip Hop Degrade Women
    Some believe that the Hip Hop industry manipulates the young minds of our new generation against women, do you? Back when Hip-Hop began, it was originally meant to send a message of unity. Doug E Fresh quoted "Hip-Hop is supposed to uplift and create, to educate people on a larger level and to make a change." Old-School Hip-Hop was about storytelling and poetry as well, where you're from and telling your story in a good manner. Unfortunately Hip-Hop will never be the same as it was in the...
    711 Words | 2 Pages
  • Is Hip Hop Dead???
    Exploratory Paper Mrs. Dickens RHT 160-052 15 February 2008 Is Hip Hop Dead??? I can still recall the first hip hop album I listened to. It was Reasonable Doubt by Jay Z. I remember how I instantly fell in love with the lyrics. I hadn’t heard anything like it before, primarily because I only listened to R&B and some watered down rap music. The lyrics were hard hitting. They meant something. I could his hunger through the speakers as he rapped his song entitled “Can I Live” which said “Well...
    1,491 Words | 4 Pages
  • Hip Hop morals - 875 Words
    Hip-Hop Artists: Role Models in the Music Industry Introduction: -Ice Breaker: Name and what is your favorite music artist? (preferably hip hop artist) -When you hear the term hip hop, what comes to mind? What is hip-hop? A culture and form of ground breaking music and self expression with elements that consisted of the elements of graffiti art, DJing, MCing, and breaking. It began in the 1970s as an underground movement in the South Bronx area of New York City. Hip hop is used as...
    875 Words | 3 Pages
  • the decline of hip hop - 1150 Words
     The decline of hip-hop Name: Georjette Jeanlouis Class: English CP Date: 6/6/2014 There are many definitions of this term called hip-hop; mainly hip-hop is not just a genre of music… or just a word. Hip-Hop is a lifestyle some people live by that is consisting of four elements-- such as break dancing, graffiti art, disc jockey, and master of comedy-- coining together to form this term called “Hip- Hop”. Hip-hop has taken America by the storm with their new fashion trends, latest...
    1,150 Words | 3 Pages
  • Hip Hop Annoted Bibliography
    Annotated Bibliography Research Question: What are the history/cultural importance of Hip Hop? Source #1: Hill, Collins Patricia. From Black Power to Hip Hop: Racism, Nationalism, and Feminism. Philadelphia: Temple Up, 2006. Print. Patricia Hill’s l idea of writing this book was to gather different essays for each chapter that were written by African Americans that talks about how they dealt without having the right to stand up for themselves. The importance of this book is to talk about...
    742 Words | 2 Pages
  • Quitting Hip Hop - 495 Words
    Quitting Hip-Hop Quitting Hip-Hop is about a woman named Michaela Angela Davis who can no longer reconcile her love of a great rap beat with the derogatory images of women pervasive in much of today’s music and videos. This article address’ the intended audience of parents and teens, it will inform the negative influence hip hop music videos has on society, and how she gets through the struggles of how she was a part of that influence. I believe the audience intended to read this...
    495 Words | 2 Pages
  • Hip Hop Music - 1355 Words
    There are some forms of music that seem to transcend the sands of time. For example, the classical music pieces of Johann Sebastian Bach and Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart are still relevant in various areas of education and enjoyment today, from everyday piano lessons to speculation of creating smarter babies. Hip Hop is another form of music that seems as if it is starting to transcend the sands of time, but in a slightly different way. Since the emergence of Hip Hop at the early end of the 20th...
    1,355 Words | 4 Pages
  • Hip Hop vs America
    Hip-Hop vs. America By: Phairron Price Angel Jenkins There is a huge controversy going on right now between the Hip-Hop Culture and America. When we say America we really we The U.S. Even though hip-hop is worldwide. Hip Hop means the whole culture of the movement. When you talk about rap. Rap is of the hip-hop culture. The emceeing. The d-jaying is part of the hip-hop culture. The dressing the languages are all part of the hip-hop culture. The break-dancing, the b-boys, and...
    1,140 Words | 3 Pages
  • Hip Hop in Society - 1458 Words
    HIP-HOP: STARTED FROM THE BOTTOM AND NOW WE ARE HERE Rasheeda Brown AP English 12 In order for one to understand the genre Hip-hop, one must know the origination, the changes over the years, and the impact hip-hop has on today’s society. Hip-hop has been around for more than a few decades and it has been considered to be one of the most controversial subjects for quite some time. Some people say hip hop encourages hate and violence, others say it encourages self believe and tackle social...
    1,458 Words | 4 Pages
  • Hip Hop: Dead or Alive
    Michael Hinden English 101 Honors Hip-Hop: Dead or Alive Since the invention of the internet and P2P (peer 2 peer) downloading all genres of music have become victims of free music downloads and suffered in record sales. However, why has hip-hop music seemingly taken an extra hit? According to Billboard Magazine, “since 2000, rap sales dropped 44%,and declined to 10% of all music sales, which, while still a commanding figure when compared to other genres, is a significant drop from the 13%...
    1,049 Words | 3 Pages
  • Hip Hop Effects - 2092 Words
    Hip-Hop’s Media Effects ------------------------------------------------- Term Paper Javier Sanchez Hip-Hop’s Media Effects ------------------------------------------------- Term Paper Javier Sanchez Music. What do you think of when you think of music? Do you think of your favorite singer/ band, or maybe your favorite song at the time; but how often do you think about how that one song, or artist(s) have affected your life, your outlook on politics, society, way of living or way of...
    2,092 Words | 6 Pages
  • Exemplification: Hip Hop Music
    Leon White November 27, 2011 Period 5th Exemplification Essay Hip hop music is the most “put down” music on earth. In my opinion hip hop is also the most influential music in the world. I know what you’re thinking, this is very arguable, but indeed it is true. It’s been around over 40 years now. It’s had its up and its downs. Every one of different colors and genders listen and also participate in hip hop you music. One reason I think hip hop is the most prominent music genre in the...
    495 Words | 2 Pages
  • Women in Hip Hop - 1556 Words
    “Woman in Hip-Hop” Although hip-hop generally contains male emcees, there has been a plethora of female emcees in the earlier hip-hop days that have made a positive impact on the hip-hop community and the culture itself. Hip-Hop started in 1970 by DJ Kool Herc, but it wasn’t until 1979 that the first female emcee emerged. Her name was Wendy Clark A.K.A “Lady B”. She began spinning hip-hop records on WHAT 1340 AM in Philadelphia. She expanded hip-hop outside of New York to Philadelphia....
    1,556 Words | 4 Pages
  • Hip Hop Culture - 406 Words
    Hip Hop and Teenagers 1. What is your name? 2. What does hip hop mean to you? 3. What are the affects of hip hop in your life? 4. What are the affects of hip hop on the people around you? 5. Do you think hip hop has a good or bad influence on teenagers? 6. What are the negatives effects of hip hop on you 7. What are the positives effects of hip hop on you? 8. Do you recommend people to listen to hip hop? Why? What is hip hop to teenagers?...
    406 Words | 2 Pages
  • Rationalization of Hip Hop - 3405 Words
     Can’t Stop, Won’t Stop: Contemporary Hip-Hop Sameness In contemporary popular culture, hip-hop music is as ubiquitous as Taylor Swift, the new teen pop sweetheart, or arguably more popular than the once-prevailing American genre, rock and roll music. However, although one can argue that a wide breadth of hip-hop pervades the airways, it would be very difficult to contend that a wide depth of the genre is played. In fact, the vast majority of mainstream hip-hop music focuses on money and...
    3,405 Words | 10 Pages
  • Hip Hop Fashion - 662 Words
    Jordan Royse According to KRS One, Hip Hop fashion is one of the nine "extended" elements of hip-hop culture. Hip-hop fashion refers to a particular style of dress that originated with African-American and Latino people in New York City. Hip hop fashion has changed drastically over the years. During the 1980s, major hip-hop stars of like Run-DMC and LL Cool J wore things like large glasses, kangol hats, multi-finger rings, and sneakers. Artists such as Kurtis Blow and Big Daddy...
    662 Words | 2 Pages
  • Hip Hop History and Reflections
    Rap is something you do, Hip hop is something you live… A historical reflection of Hip Hop Name: Jake Parker Student number: 100072668 Date: Friday, March 30, 2007 Professor: Mark Adam Let's bring it back with that Ol' New York rap. Hip hop is amazing, straight up. It's not just the music, it's everything involved with the four elements of hip hop; the emceeing (rapping), the DJing, the graffiti, and the break dancing. When I was younger I used to search for "hip-hop" and "rap"...
    1,377 Words | 4 Pages
  • Linguistics and Hip Hop - 7045 Words
    INTRODUCTION The way in which we choose to communicate plays an integral role into how we understand ourselves and our environment. As our world continues to globalize new phenomenons begin to emerge that heavily affect the way we communicate and subsequently the notion of our identities. In the past, our identities have been linked to our local languages, (Pennycook, 2003, p. 516) however as our world progresses this belief is far too simple and requires much more thought. Globalization...
    7,045 Words | 22 Pages
  • the hip-hop subculture - 1906 Words
    Surname 5 Name: Instructor: Course: Date: Gang. Skeleton draft. The hip hop subculture is a way of life tethered to and popularized by the widespread practice of rap music. It originates from the African American community. It is expressed through flashy modes of dressing, graffiti art forms, break dancing, and slang. However, with the passage of time, the culture has traversed racial and cultural lines and has become one of the most practiced genres of music throughout the world, with an...
    1,906 Words | 6 Pages
  • The Origins of Hip Hop - 1109 Words
    The Evolution of Hip-Hop and Transformation of Rap Music Hip-hop, not to be confused with the musical genre, is a form of musical demonstration and artistic culture that has remained popular since its emergence in the 1970s. It can be categorized as a cultural movement that includes four primary elements: Disk jockeying (DJing), rapping (emceeing), break dancing, and graffiti art. It gave birth to a new musical genre known as “rap,” a rhythmic style in which lyrics are spoken or chanted. Over...
    1,109 Words | 3 Pages
  • Hip Hop and the Illuminati - 1479 Words
    Are we being fooled by The Hip-Hop Industry? A lot of us today really enjoy hip hop music, maybe because of the catchy beats, addictive hooks, or glamorized artiste that write and perform the songs, but do we really understand the power behind the messages in these songs. About two years ago I was introduced to the teachings of Evangelist G Craig Lewis, he stated that Hip Hop really is not all it is cut out to be but instead a satanic religion used to sway the mass to serve and alternative...
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  • Hip Hop Culture - 1109 Words
    “A Reflection of Hip Hop’s Past: Is it Still Relevant?” Have you ever noticed the similarities between hip hop dance and African dance? Has the rhythm in African drums ever remind you of hip hop beats? How about Minstrel shows and the purpose behind them; are they similar to hip hop shows today? There is in fact a strong connection between the three topics and the hip culture. Hip hop is full of excitement, unity, passion and controversy. These characteristics of hip hop would be non-existent...
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  • Hip Hop History - 734 Words
    When the public thinks about hip-hop, people more than likely come up with the rhyming, beats with profound base, and the scratching of a record into their mind. However, Hip-hop has become a part of American culture with its music, and lifestyle. The style of music has transformed from the rap music that we see these days. The ground-breaking establishment of artists helped institute the hip-hop movement in many types of music, and its performance. It has also branched into in many different...
    734 Words | 2 Pages
  • The history of Hip-Hop - 831 Words
    Music has been around since the beginning of civilization. Music was used to tell myths, religous stories and even warrior tales. Since the beginning of civilization music has greatly progressed. Music still tells a story, now we just have many genres to fulfill the cultural and social tastes of our modern day society. Hip-hop is a genre of music that has significantly grown the last couple of decades. It’s increased popularity has brought it to the forefront of globalization. Since hip-hop has...
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  • hip hop race - 508 Words
    Matt Ambro Professor Robles Race-Response Paper 2 October 22, 2013 Race in Hip Hop It is a common belief that hip hop has served as the medium for healing racial tension in the 21st century. Although the hip hop industry has seen a subtle wave of successful white American rappers over the past couple of decades, this is not enough to suggest a racial merge in the predominately black American world of hip hop. White Americans are not typically welcomed into the hip hop community....
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  • Hip Hop an Art Form
    As long as I can remember, music has always been a powerful influence in my life. Similar to any other type of art form, hip hop evolves personal struggles… from our fight for civil rights to our acceptance into society. The pioneers of this movement have strengthened, encouraged, and empowered my people with the positive messages communicated through lyrics. Critics of this movement believe that this type of music affects today's already troubled youth and that some rappers tends to deliver...
    912 Words | 3 Pages
  • Hip Hop and Americas Youth
     Hip Hop and America’s youth community Jason C. Hudson ENGL 1133: Freshman Composition II Dr. Trninic March 27, 2014 Music is a large part of life, it is important to America’s culture and identity. Music can produce a negative effect on behavior and susceptible audiences, leading to aggressive behavior in many of American youth. There have been many debates over hip-hop and its influence on the youth community in America. Some people believe that it has a...
    1,268 Words | 4 Pages
  • hip hop music - 1420 Words
    By Ronald Roach As a cultural movement, hip-hop manages to get billed as both a positive and negative influence on young people, especially on Black and Latino youth. On one hand, there are African American activists, artists and entrepreneurs, such as Russell Simmons, who seek to build a progressive political movement among young hip-hop fans and who have had modest success with voter registration efforts. On the other hand, there’s no shortage of critics who denounce the negative portrayals...
    1,420 Words | 4 Pages
  • Hip Hop America - 538 Words
    Hip Hop America Nelson George's Hip Hop America discusses the nature of hip hop along with the relationship between African Americans and America. Many take the idea of hip hop to be just African Americans and rap music. George continually focuses on hip hop's many contradictions. He addresses how hip hop represents race, ethnicity, class, gender, and generation. George covers much familiar ground: how B-beats became hip hop; how technology changed popular music, which helped to create new...
    538 Words | 2 Pages
  • Religion and Hip Hop analysis
    Davon Brown 11/25/13 Hip Hop is a cultural art form whose elements like MCing, breakdancing, graffiti, and DJing are utilized by participating members to illustrate their life experiences and the world around them. Hip Hop artists and most songs display religious aspects like communicating to a supernatural, grappling with existential questions, and the articulation of subjectivity. One song that illustrate different religious aspects is Lord Knows by Ace Hood. Ace Hood is viewed as an...
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  • Hip Hop Stars - 654 Words
     Research Essay #1 draft Many Hip Hop Star Influence Teens Have you ever wanted to be like a hip hop star? Many teenagers choose hip hop star as their role model because that’s all they see and like the way they dress and act. Hip Hop stars influence teenagers in this century by the things they sing or rap in songs, how they dress, and what they do. Hip Hop singers and rappers influence teenagers in their music of today. Ever since the rise of rap and hip-hip music, teen have been...
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  • Hip Hop Nation Language
    The Language of Hip Hop Term paper for the PS "The English Language in America" SS 2006 handed in by Sebastian Ludyga Magdeburg, 25.09.2006 Table of contents 1. Introduction to hip hop 1 2. Hip Hop Nation Language 2 2.1 Features of the HHNL 3 2.2 The relationship of HHNL and AAL 5 3. Practical application 6 4. Conclusion...
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  • Hip Hop Culture - 2240 Words
    Assignment for Media with Cultural Studies Level Two Youth Cultures, Subcultures and Industry Hip-Hop Culture This essay aims to examine the importance of the Hip-Hop culture in 21st century society. It will begin with consideration of the history of Hip-Hop, discussing its stylistic adaptations, cultural preferences and concerns, referring to the studies of black culture by Ellis Cashmore and Mark Neal. Within this I will explore the ethnicity and authenticity of the culture, with...
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  • The Hip-Hop Defense - 795 Words
    The Hip Hop Defense Everyone has an opinion about the influence of hip--hop music on our nations youth. Many people, such as politicians and the ultra conservative, feel the influence is destructive and incites violent behavior. Some people, for instance the media, believe hip- hop glamorizes inappropriate behaviors and actions while promoting the demoralization of women in general, but more specifically black women. Few people are willing to speak out and defend hip-hop music as...
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  • Hip Hop and Black Women
    Hip-hop is the latest expressive manifestation of the past and current experience as well as the collective consciousness of African-American and Latino-American youth. But more than any music of the past, it also expresses mainstream American ideas that have now been internalized and embedded into the psyches of American people of color over time. A part of the learned mainstream American culture is sexism and misogyny. Hip-hop culture is frequently condemned for its misogynistic...
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  • Hip Hop Music - 2217 Words
     Introduction Hip hop has been around since the early 70s. Some may say it was originated in New York and others may disagree (History of Hip Hop style, 2012). However, we can all come to one conclusion that hip hop is influential. Hip hop's largest fan base is the teenager population. It has changed over time from Run-DMC to now Lil Wayne and Drake. Hip hop will always be hip hop but it has changed overtime. It is...
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  • Hip Hop Music - 1925 Words
    In the following essay I will be applying Arjun Appadurai’s theory of global cultural flows and social imagination to the two African hip hop case studies written by Kunzler and Badsha. I will be analysing the case studies with regard to Appadurai and his theories. Appadurai’s theory was to look at the effects of globalisation on culture and how it has affected the society. He makes five very important points towards global cultural flows. He thought of it as different streams that flow into...
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  • Hip Hop Planet - 282 Words
    Question What I think What my partner thinks Based on the title, what do you think you will be reading about? I think Ill be reading about how music in this generation has changed our world. Paragraph 1: What does this paragraph tell you about how McBride feels about hip hop? He dislikes hip hop because he feels as if it isnt music, that all rappers are bad influences. Paragraph 1: What does McBride realize in this nightmare scenario? ...
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  • Hip Hop: an American Culture
    Hip-Hop Over the course of history music has been a center piece in every culture. Every genre of music can be linked to a specific culture or demographic group. Within that link one can look at music beyond the sound of it. Music can be seen as an emotion, an inspiration, and a tool for communication. Within the last 50 years music has become a great unifier of diverse populations (www.csupomona.edu). This is evident in the songs that are written by music artist and groups. Their...
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  • Hip Hop Term Paper
    Since the inception of hip-hop, the sound and the feeling of hip-hop has transformed into a whole new sound. Hip-Hop has changed drastically. The feeling and sound of hip-hop has stretched to a whole different sound which makes us question, is this hip-hop? Hip Hop evolved in the 1970’s, credited to African Bambatta. In the Bronx it was the mainstream to see everyone gathered at the block parties to see all the DJ’s. From that one block party, there was more and more giving those DJ’s their...
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  • Hip Hop Saved My Life
    In the Webster’s dictionary, Hip Hop is defined as a subculture of inner-city youth who are typically devoted to rap music. Hip Hop is more than a genre, it is a lifestyle. Hip Hop to me isn’t all about money, clothes, partying, violence, gangs, drugs, misogyny, weapons, sex, cars, jewelry as in bling- bling, guys or girls; it is much deeper than that. It goes all the way back to my childhood when “cats were spitting mad rhymes” over some beatboxing. Emcees came up with the most amazing lines,...
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  • Harlem Renaissance & the Hip Hop Movement
    Harlem Renaissance and the Hip-hop Movement AN OVERVIEW The Harlem Renaissance and the Hip-Hop Movement are a culmination of co-related cultural art forms that have emerged out of the black experience. White people understood black people more through their expression of art during both movements. Both movements brought about a broad cross-racial following and, ironically, in both instances brought about a better understanding of the black experience for white America. The bridge...
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  • How Hip hops portrays women
    Jasmine Howard 23 October 2013 Hip Hop’s Portrayal of Black Women Hip hop has changed drastically over the course of years. In the earlier ages, Hip hop artists valued plenty of originality by creatively expressing themselves in a positive way to their surroundings. Now it seems as if artists are preying on women as if they’re animals by lacking its true originality and being ran over by commercialism. Hip hop represents a tree gradually losing its leaves over time. Somehow, the hip...
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  • The Effects Hip Hop Has on Society
    Not being bias but this controversy started many years ago. The profile of Women and men that started in hip hop music has evolved drastically over time causing an influential impact negatively and positively towards children, young adults and grown-ups. Rap and hip hop began back in the 70’s when everything was all good. The music was great and people were happy in the black community although struggling was a common thing and was overlooked. A different breed of rappers came about and the game...
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  • Subculture of Hip Hop: a Sociological Analysis
    It all started with the birth of a nation. The shameful crimes that build this country rest on the backs of an enslaved people, yesterday in chains and with laws and today behind bars and within socialization. The tale is as old as our time. The first slaves were brought to the Virginia Colony in the early 1600s. they were simply indentured servant whom would be released after working an agreed number of years. They came to America on a voluntary basis. Soon after, that model of slavery was...
    1,480 Words | 5 Pages
  • Stereotypes of Women in the Hip-Hop Culture
    College Writing I Sec. 39 15 March 2010 Stereotypes of Women in the Hip-Hop Culture Have you ever wondered what it would be like if there were no stereotyping in America. Stereotyping has been around for quite a long time and women in particular have been stereotyped for numerous reasons. There are various things in society today that put women down for the things they do. Hip hop music and their music videos have been around since the 1980’s and continues to be very popular among young...
    1,330 Words | 4 Pages
  • Misogyny & Hip Hop W Sources
    Misogyny in Hip Hop | 3.5.2012Dr. Tshombe WalkerAFR 1503 | Tina Marie | Misogyny in Hip Hop culture refers to lyrics, videos, or other aspects of hip hop culture that support, glorify, justify or normalize the objectification, exploitation or victimization of women. Misogyny in hip hop music instills and perpetuates negative stereotypes about women. It can range from innuendos to stereotypical characterizations and defamations. Overt misogyny in rap and hip hop music emerged in...
    1,581 Words | 5 Pages
  • Hip Hops Betrayal of Black Women
    Adrian Middleton Comp I 25 Sept. 2011 Hip Hop’s Betrayal of Black Women The Hip Hop music industry is infamous for being controversial. In the article Hip Hop’s Betrayal of Black Women there’s a debate on whether the exploitation and constant verbal slander of women should be acceptable just because it sales records. It presents the question that why is it that male poverty breeds sexism? Even though women may have lived in the same environment males still see women as the enemy in their...
    961 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Way Hip Hop Influences Me
    Does Rap Influence Teenage Violence? Music is said to be the backbone of life, it soothes emotions and help us cope with hardship and heartaches and youths in America are considered part of the rap culture. One genre of music some people disagree on is rap music, yes those people might listen to rap but would prefer R&B. Rap music has a major effect on the violence that teens involve themselves in today. The term rap in itself means some form of violence, if you look at the synonyms that...
    887 Words | 3 Pages
  • Hip Hop and Race Relations in America
    KRS One once said, "Rap is something you do, Hip-Hop is something you live." The difference between how Hip-Hop is portrayed (rap) and what the Hip-Hop movement is, is that Hip-Hop is a lifestyle but the Hip-Hop we see on television is a media creation. We have to look at hip-hop as a whole culture and rap as something that comes out of it. Although Hip-Hop was originated by a mostly Negro constituency, it has evolved since its creation into a "worldwide forum through which family, community,...
    2,134 Words | 5 Pages
  • Hip Hop Infuence on Society Outline
    Thesis: Hip-hop is a positive influence on, modern society. Claim: I. Breakdancing, the influence of this high energy dance has reached every corner of the globe and brings breakers from all over to aim for the top while constantly learning from one another. a. Once a year there are crew battles at Battle of the Year which started in Germany to see who is the best breakdancing crew in the world, this was created after the influence of breakdancing in America struck the world....
    346 Words | 1 Page
  • Effects of Hip-Hop Throughout Generations
    Effects of Hip-hop Throughout Generations Hip-hop is a genre that has greatly influenced generations and has been used to inspire, motivate, and promote. Although the first thought of hip-hop is hip-hop music, it has involved into a sense of hip-hop culture. There are different categories of hip-hop such as music, dancing, style, and art. These days, hip-hop is expressed in many different ways. Because of its popularity, hip-hop can be...
    848 Words | 3 Pages
  • Christian Hip-Hop vs. Secular
    Christian Hip-hop VS Secular Hip-hop Donald Payne COM/170 6/12/12 Faith lbarra Christian Hip-hop VS Secular Hip-hop Hip-hop is a form of popular music that’s comprised mainly of emceeing and deejaying. As hip-hop continues to evolve into a successful enterprise, it has emerged into trends, such as clothing styles, improper dialogue known as slang, and an overall general mindset. While the secular industry of hip-hop promotes sex, drugs, and violence, to name a few; the Christian...
    1,140 Words | 3 Pages
  • Pop Culture Meets Hip-Hop
    Pop Culture Meets Hip-Hop Popular culture, otherwise known as "Pop Culture," is defined by Encarta's Online Encyclopedia as values that come from advertising, the entertainment industry, the media, and icons of style and are targeted to the ordinary people of today's society. Some of the more influencing displays of pop culture today include movies, teen icons, clothing, celebrities, sports, and one of the most influential things, music. The music industry plays a huge role in today's...
    2,233 Words | 5 Pages
  • Reaction Paper to Hip Hop Anansi
    I enjoyed my first Imagination Stage performance of "Hip Hop Anansi." I am glad that I chose to bring my daughter along with me as well for her to enjoy the show. Although I felt the show was targeted toward children, I believed it brought a positive view of the hip hop culture to youth. All of the characters were deeply embedded in their roles while their upbeat and youthful characters seemed to keep the play moving along. At times I felt it was difficult to pay attention to the sigh...
    600 Words | 2 Pages
  • Hip-Hop Negativitiy Towards the Youth
    Hip-Hop is the probably the most influential genre in our society today. Arthur Baker said, "I remember being told 'Someone's gonna make a fortune out of this rap thing' and thinking 'no way'," ("Rap Quotes" 1). Arthur Baker was one of the most noticeable and widely-emulated of the first hip-hop producers ("Arthur" 1). Little did he know what the negative effect that this form of music would have on today's youth. With violence and drug use rising, one must wonder, "What's the cause"" Though...
    1,924 Words | 5 Pages
  • Old School Versus New School Hip Hop
    Benjamin Anderson Ms. Marae Bailey English 110 January 18, 2010 Old School versus New School Hip Hop Many people believe that all hip hop music is the same. They think hip hop is about the beat of the music and the fame of the rapper. However, the true difference occurs when you look at how old school hip hop became mainstreamed. Original hip hop was about the disc jockey that played the music. The music of hip hop were humble and about pleasing the crowd; while new school has become...
    970 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Mistaken Identity of Hip Hop (Initial Outline)
    The topic that I chose to examine and write about for my final paper is the difference between rap and hip hop on a more technical basis. The reason that I chose this topic in particular, is because as I matured from a boy and was allowed my own opinion and preference on what music that I listened to, rap and hip hop were the more predominant types of music that I invited. I listened to a fairly wide variety of music other than that, of course, but what stood out from the rest was the music with...
    351 Words | 1 Page
  • Positive Women in Hip Hop: Feminism in a Patriarchal Society
    Ciji Fox Dr. Burns-Ardolino Research Methods April 22, 2007 Positive Women in Hip Hop: Feminism in a Patriarchal Society I. Summary Despite the negative images that we are over exposed to, can society identify positive women in hip hop? As hip hop promises to become main stream, it is gradually morphing into a component that will eventually be accepted as popular culture. However, the degradation of women continues to be a staple of the hip hop culture. In rap music women are...
    3,373 Words | 9 Pages

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