Gorilla Essays & Research Papers

Best Gorilla Essays

  • Mountain Gorillas - 591 Words
    Half man and half beast. This is what is usually said about the gorilla. They say that the gorilla is related to us. You can find mountain gorillas in the Virunga Volcanoes, which are located on the boundaries of Zaire, Rwanda, and Uganda. The Virungas are 600 miles of tropical rainforest. You’ll find then roaming around 7,800 and 11,000 feet, but at low elevations. The gorillas live in units. Most of the units consist of about 6-12 members in it, most of them being related in...
    591 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Mountain Gorilla - 614 Words
    The gorilla is the bulkiest member of the primate family; an adult gorilla may grow up to 1.8m high (although they seldom stand fully upright). There are three species of gorillas recognized worldwide. The most common race, the western lowland gorilla is not present in Uganda but an estimated 40000 live in the rainforests of west and central Africa. The endangered eastern lowland gorilla is restricted to patches of forests in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. The most threatened specie is...
    614 Words | 2 Pages
  • Mountain Gorillas - 1010 Words
    Jeri Landon March 1, 2013 Conservation Biology Mountain Gorilla Murder in Africa If you have ever looked into the eyes of a gorilla, you realize how human they look. That is because people and gorillas are ninety-eight percent genetically identical. There are two species of gorilla: Eastern gorillas and the mountain gorillas.”Gorillas are patchily distributed in east central and equatorial West Africa, separated by the Congo River and its tributaries, Eastern gorillas (including mountain...
    1,010 Words | 2 Pages
  • Gorillas in the Mist - 631 Words
    A) Gorillas in the Mist is the non-fiction story of a Kentucky woman's experience living among the wild gorillas of the Virungas Mountains. The conservation parks that she worked in are located in areas that cover parts of the three African countries of Rwanda, Uganda, and Zaire. Dian Fossey was inspired to devote her life to these primates by the famous anthropologist Dr. Louis Leakey, who funded her research. Through her stay in the wild terrain Dian soon thinks of as home, she educates us...
    631 Words | 2 Pages
  • All Gorilla Essays

  • Saving Gorillas - 314 Words
    Not many people know that Gorillas are endangered creatures. Both of the species of Gorillas are classified as endangered. Poaching is a huge threat to the Gorillas, with it continuing to be one of the main reasons why they are in such trouble. The Gorillas are hunted and poached in many different parts of the world (mainly in Congo, Africa), often to sell their body parts as souvenirs. Most people many find it crazy to think of such a thing to hunt such a beautiful and...
    314 Words | 1 Page
  • Respect in Gorilla, My Love
    Respect in “Gorilla, My Love” The short story, “Gorilla, My Love,” was written by Toni Cade Bambara. Hazel comes across a few instances where she feels as if she doesn’t get treated the same as adults do simply because she is only a child. She was disappointed by her uncle, Hunca Bubba or Jefferson Winston Vale, whose marriage proposal she took seriously only to find out when she was older that he was just teasing her. Hazel wanted to be able to take adults’ word for what they say. The adults...
    694 Words | 2 Pages
  • Gorillas in the Mist: by Dian Fossey
    Dian Fossey was a good researcher. But, what is a researcher? One who conducts research? Surely that is the correct definition, but to properly understand the definition we would then have to define the word research. Research is the process of collecting data and information in order to obtain knowledge about the research topic. With these definitions we can say, without a doubt, that Dian Fossey was a researcher. But why was she a “good” researcher? By reading the book ‘Gorillas in the Mist’...
    1,077 Words | 3 Pages
  • Threat of Endangerment: the Mountain Gorilla
    The mountain gorilla was first discovered roaming the Virunga Volcanoes in Rwanda (von Beringe, 2002, p.9). German Captain Robert von Beringe and his African soldiers stumbled upon two mountain gorillas around the volcanic region on October 17, 1902 (von Beringe, 2002, p.9). Von Beringe captured and killed one of them and sent the body to the Zoological Museum in Berlin, Germany. Professor Paul Matschie, who worked with the museum, identified the gorilla as a new class and named it after its...
    967 Words | 3 Pages
  • Gorillas in the Mist Summary - 2715 Words
    Chapter 1: Dian Fossey plans a trip for seven weeks to Africa where she will study gorillas and meet scientists Louis and Mary Leakey. Fossey goes with the Leakey’s to look at a giraffe fossil at an excavation site. She ends up falling into the ditch where the fossil was, breaking her ankle and throwing up all over the fossil. After two weeks of recovering, Fossey goes to study gorillas with Alan Root, a photographer, and his wife, Joan. After watching the gorillas, Fossey returns to her...
    2,715 Words | 7 Pages
  • Gorilla Research Paper - 861 Words
    Common name- Gorilla Scientific name- Gorilla gorilla class- mammalia order- primata family- pongidae genus- gorilla The gorillas live mainly in coastal West Africa in the Congo, Zaire, Gabon, Equatorial Guinea and Cameroon. Gorillas live in the rain forest. They usually live on the ground but build nest in trees to sleep in. Gorilla troops keep a 15-20 square mile range which often overlaps the range of other troops. There are three different kinds of gorillas. The eastern lowland...
    861 Words | 3 Pages
  • Western Lowland Gorillas - 587 Words
    Western Lowland Gorillas October 23, 2009 Introduction: When I was around 14, I saw one of the best movies. The movie was Gorillas in The Mist, starting Sigourney Weaver as Dian Fossey. It was one of the most impressive movies of my life. My step-mother at the time notice how must I liked the movie and game me her very well torn copy of Gorillas in the Mist to read. I still have that book and since the first time I read it, I have been fascinated with these great apes. This is way I...
    587 Words | 2 Pages
  • Gorillas: “in Verge of Extinction”
    Table of contents · Gorilla …………………………………………………………………pg.3 · Physical characteristics and behavior…………………………….. pg.4 · Endangerment………………………………………………………...pg.5 Gorilla’s The gorilla is the largest primate, weighing as much as 275 kg (600 lb). Gorillas are forest-associated animals. Most gorillas inhabit lowland tropical rainforests and montane rainforests between 1500 - 3500 m (4900 - 11,500 ft). Different populations have exhibited preferences for forest margins, secondary...
    1,133 Words | 4 Pages
  • Behavioral Studies of the Western Lowland Gorilla
    The results, detailed in the current issue of the science journal Current Biology, may help to explain curiously peaceful interactions among neighboring social groups. The groups were observed in new behavioral studies of the western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla). 1. The study could also provide clues about the role and development of kinship in early human society, say researchers behind the work. Despite being the most numerous kind of gorilla, the western lowland gorilla species...
    723 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Environmental and Social Credentials of Uganda Gorilla Safaris
    Trek Uganda – Environmental and Social Responsibility Credentials. Trek Uganda is a challenge based in the Bwindi Impenetrable Forest. There are only an estimated 786 Gorillas left in the wild of which half live in Uganda’s Impenetrable Forest. The Ugandan Wildlife Authority has set up strict rules regarding ecotourism surrounding the gorillas and it is only possible to visit them in organised tours of 30 people. At present Dream Challenges has an exclusive contract with Nkuringo Walking...
    481 Words | 2 Pages
  • Great Apes - 321 Words
    Great Apes as Food This article talks about the love for great apes meat in Central Africa. Although some religions forbidden ape meat as food but others like to consume the meat and they actually prefer it from the other meats. There are many reasons why central Africans like Consuming great apes as food other than the taste. In Some parts of central Africa people believe that eating Apes as food would bring strength and power that these great apes possess. Medicine plays a role in...
    321 Words | 1 Page
  • Essays on Scenario of World If Maths Is Removed Wiki
    AMUR LEOPARD The Amur leopard (Panthera pardus orientalis) is a very rare leopard subspecies that lives only in the remote and snowy northern forests of eastern Russian’s Primorye region. Its former range included Korea and northern China, but the Amur leopard is now extinct in those countries. A 2007 census counted only 14-20 adult Amur leopards and 5-6 cubs. Threats facing the species include habitat loss due to logging, road building and encroaching civilization, poaching (illegal...
    491 Words | 2 Pages
  • sociology - 1034 Words
    1,Jane Goodall 1. Jane Goodall is a noted humanitarian, environmentalist, and has spent many years observing the behaviour of Chimpanzees in their native habitat. Born: April 3, 1934 (age 79), London, United Kingdom Children: Hugo Eric Louis van Lawick Awards: Hubbard Medal, Nierenberg Prize, Community of Christ International Peace Award, Benjamin Franklin Medal, Edinburgh Medal, William Procter Prize for Scientific AchievementMore Education: University of Cambridge (1962–1964),...
    1,034 Words | 4 Pages
  • Bronx Zoo - 621 Words
    Bronx Zoo Experience There are many places where you can observe biodiversity. The Bronx Zoo is one of the places where you can observe biodiversity. The Bronx Zoo has been around for many years. It was first opened on November 8, 1899 and it is still open and growing today. This zoo is one of the world’s largest metropolitan zoos. The Bronx Zoo has over 600 species from around the world, many of which are endangered or threatened. Some places include; Africa, Asia, Pakistan and Madagascar....
    621 Words | 2 Pages
  • Bonobos vs Pan Paniscus
    Pan Paniscus vs. Gorilla Beringei Bonobos, sometimes called pygmy chimpanzees, survive and endure in fission-fusion social groups where a behomitic amount of individuals apportion into smaller groups of size and composition. They are classified as those involved in patrilineal groups. Bonobos are in Central Africa and the Democratic Republic of Congo. There are an estimated number of thirty thousand bonobos in existence. Bonobos abide in the swampy rainforests of the southern...
    1,167 Words | 4 Pages
  • Dian Foossey - 627 Words
    Dian Fossey Dina Fossey was viewed as a hero, because she was one of the best top American zoologists in the world who for 18 years studied gorillas in Rwanda with Louis Leakey. She was viewed by many not just as a hero but as a role model. She had all the determination to save and protect the apes, to study the apes and just risking her life to see and study them, and most likely just viewed by many others in the need of reference to find out more about the apes. She traveled to Africa and met...
    627 Words | 2 Pages
  • Ebola in Africa - 941 Words
    Ebola disease is a devastating illness, with at least 6 random outbreaks in the past decade in Africa, killing not only people but also a large number of gorillas, which threatens the species into extinction. The mystery surrounding Ebola has grown because the disease often fails to appear for years, sometimes even decades, and then suddenly breaks out in seemingly aimless areas(“Ebola threatens Apes in Africa” http://www.terradaily.com/reports/Ebola_Threatens_Apes_In_Africa.html). Ebola disease...
    941 Words | 3 Pages
  • Famous Primatologists - 1049 Words
    The closest living relative to humans are primates. The study of primates and their behaviors is primatology. Primatology provides a better understanding of the many aspects of the research, preservation and conservation of primates. The field of primatology has been fortunate to have several outstanding scientists, among them Jane Goodall, the late Dian Fossey and Birute Galdikas. Each of them has accomplished considerable works documenting and interpreting the lives of chimpanzees,...
    1,049 Words | 3 Pages
  • pre 1914 poetry carol ann duffy
    Carol Ann Duffy's 'Queen Kong [From the world's wife, 1998]', is the feminine version of the American blockbuster movie king Kong, where a giant gorilla kidnaps a beautiful model whom he is fond of and climbs the empire state building with. However, Duffy's version has switched up the roles, where the gorilla is now a woman, and the man who she kidnaps is referred to as 'the little man' who she is very much in love with. In comparison to my second poem, 'To his Coy Mistress' [1650] by Andrew...
    1,133 Words | 3 Pages
  • Analysis of Dog Bites - 766 Words
     Haley Hallowell Dr. Ann Bomberger LENG 241 10 September 2013 Syndrome X and the Silverback Gorillas That’s when it happened. Nothing made Dad suffer more than my syndrome being triggered. I’d stop looking people in the eye, and become detached, spacy. If there was something to chew on I’d chew on it, didn’t matter if it was my nails or the drawstring from the hood on my sweatshirt. Sometimes I tasted blood, I chewed so much, or if it wasn’t blood, something salty. What really got...
    766 Words | 2 Pages
  • Research on Primates at the Zoo - 1888 Words
    [pic] A Zoo for a Primate Observation 11/15/2012 For this paper I decided to visit Zoo Atlanta to observe lowland gorillas. I got to the zoo at around eleven in the morning and found out the feeding times for the gorillas. Once I found them, after watching them for a little while I selected the most active group to go watch during feeding. The point of this trip was to make me feel as if I was doing a field laboratory observation...
    1,888 Words | 5 Pages
  • bipedalism - 819 Words
     While humans and primates are related in many ways, there are distinct characteristics for hominids. The most unique characteristic difference that separates hominids and non-human primates is bipedalism. While hominids walk on two feet, non-human primates are quadrupedal, using all fours to get around. Multiple experiments were conducted to identify between the advantages and disadvantages of being bipedal. The first experiment involved observing human and non-human primates and their...
    819 Words | 3 Pages
  • Primate Observation - San Diego Zoo
    Mark Mariano Professor Guenther Anthropology 131 November 25, 2012 Primate Observation Primates are one of the most interesting mammals on earth, not only because of their complex social structures, but because they hold so many similar characteristics to humans. Primates are often cited as our closest living relatives and on two separate occasions I observed four separate species of primates at the San Diego Zoo that can justify their use of their physical characteristics...
    2,013 Words | 5 Pages
  • Primate Assignment - 894 Words
    Anthropology 201 Primate Assignment Gorillas normally live to be around to 30-50 years old and weigh to be 300-450 pounds (males). Gorillas, like many of the great apes have arms that are longer than their legs and they walk on all fours. This form of walking is called knuckle walking. Gorillas are ground-dwelling and live in groups of around 6 with the oldest gorilla as the alpa leading his group of a females and their young. The oldest and largest silverback, (the alpha) tends to be...
    894 Words | 3 Pages
  • equal rights for great apes
    Rights for Great Apes I support scientists researching on and experimenting with great apes. Since scientists don’t want to jeopardize the lives of humans, they test on apes. If they were not testing apes, then they would be testing other animals which other people would also fight against. Scientists perform tests on these apes for one very important reason, “98.4 percent of the DNA in chimpanzees (and 97.7 percent of the DNA in gorillas) is identical to the DNA of human beings.” This...
    1,211 Words | 3 Pages
  • Reaction Paper - 562 Words
    If this were true, then perhaps big-headed people wouldn't be so pea-brained. This question is mired in many unknowns. For one, scientists still debate over the definition of intelligence. For any IQ definition, how do you measure it? Further, do differences in IQ show up in daily life? And finally, does more brain tissue or a heftier brain equate with higher IQ? One thing scientists do agree on: A big brain alone doesn’t equate with smarts. If it did, elephants and sperm whales would win...
    562 Words | 2 Pages
  • Do Primates Posses Culture?
    Writing Assignment One--Do primates posses culture? I think that if culture is defined as learned behavior, than it is reasonable to say that primates posses a form of culture. Primates have been observed making tools to aid in collecting food and developing communication system, both of which are learned behaviors. It is common in monkeys, apes and humans that behavior and social organization aren't necessarily programmed into the genes. There have been several cases where an entire troop...
    620 Words | 2 Pages
  • Koko - 791 Words
    Extra Credit #1-Koko the Gorilla Koko the gorilla has been featured in many articles and TV shows. Her face has graced the covers of prestigious magazines, three books have been written about her, and scientists hang on her every word. She even has had her life story told on TV. Koko is surely the world's most proficient gorilla, having mastered more than 1,000 words in American Sign Language. In doing so, she has helped change age-old preconceptions about the limits of animal intelligence,...
    791 Words | 2 Pages
  • Primate Observation - 2701 Words
    Rome S. Professor Kindoski Anthro 001 May 18th, 2014 Primate Observation Primates are some of the most interesting animals to watch and learn about whether it be in person at a zoo or seeing a film or documentary on wild ones in a natural environment. Part of this reason is due to the incredible amount of similarities found in between primates and humans. After observing two different primate species at a local zoo, I found out that by observing their behavior, we gain a small insight into...
    2,701 Words | 7 Pages
  • Do Animals Use Some Properties of Human Language
    Are there special properties of human language or can they be found in the communication systems of other creatures? Philip Tweedle This essay will discuss whether six of Hockett’s design features, which are properties of language, are exclusively human or can they be found in other creatures communications. For each of the features, the communication of wild apes, trained apes and humans will be compared. This will not be based solely on vocal communication, but explore the...
    1,223 Words | 4 Pages
  • Ishmael Essay - 932 Words
    Hyun Park 1/31/14 Fairfax HS per 6 Ms. Antoine Ishmael Analysis The novel Ishmael written by Daniel Quinn is not like any other novels in the library. The story begins when a nameless narrator reads a newspaper ad that tells about a teacher seeking a pupil to save the...
    932 Words | 3 Pages
  • Animal Rights - 793 Words
    Stephanie Jimenez Mr. Nedelkow ERWC 19 September 2014 Do Animals Need A Bill of Rights? Animals on a daily basis all over the world are being mistreated and abused by many people that do not care for them. There are very few people attempting to protect these animals, whether they are domestic animals, farm animals, or wildlife animals. More attention should be drawn to the treatment of animals because even if we do have laws for animals and for their well being, many people still...
    793 Words | 2 Pages
  • Zoo Observations - 1729 Words
    Dillon, Jason Professor Sime ANTH 102 15 APR 2015 San Diego Zoo Observations It is impossible to go back to the past to observe exactly how different species have evolved and changed over the centuries. This is why it is important for us to observe and study these species now, in order to better understand the past and find the similarities, differences, and how each of these animals have adapted in their environments over time. To better understand ourselves, we must first understand the...
    1,729 Words | 5 Pages
  • What Makes Us Human
    What makes us human? Are humans really biologically and socially different from the rest of the created world? Is there any special characteristic that separates us from other species or any other forms of life, or humans are just an improvement on the body and shape of other animals, the processes of millions of years? There were many attempts to answer these questions. As scientists studied the human body and skeleton, it helped them to recognize the remain between humans and apes, for...
    670 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Illegal Bush Meat Trade
    THE ILLEGAL BUSH MEAT TRADE The second half of the 20th century has seen the continent of Africa in continuous turmoil. Civil wars, the AIDS epidemic, deforestation, and desertification are just a few of the problems facing Africa. A more recent threat to this ancient and fragile environment has emerged and is quickly gaining strength at devouring life – the bush meat trade. "Bush meat" refers to the smoked carcasses of various wild, and often endangered species that are sold illegally at...
    825 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Study of Evolution with a Focus on the Change from Ape to Man
    Personal investigation, written assessment The study of Evolution, with a focus on the change, from Ape to Man. The theory of evolution is a naturalistic theory of the history of life on earth however as there are many different versions and beliefs about evolution, I did research into each and decided I was most interested in the understanding of evolution through scientific ways through Apes to Humans. Within the broad topic I was immediately focusing on the similarities, between Humans...
    2,423 Words | 8 Pages
  • Cultures of Chimpanzees - 569 Words
    The Cultures of Chimpanzees In the article “The Culture of Chimpanzees” by Andrew Whiten and Christophe Boesch, they reflect on their thoughts of the culture of chimpanzees and how they resemble mankind in its earliest stages. they also states how people have no idea how much we have learned about chimpanzees in the last 2 decades, which might come to an end with all the destruction of forests we commit. Which are true statements in today’s world, I used to think that the only thing interesting...
    569 Words | 2 Pages
  • Bipedal Locomotion - 575 Words
     Take Home Writing Assignment 3: Bipedal Locomotion 1. Briefly describe the morphological features that distinguish the skeleton of bipedal hominids from that of chimpanzees and other apes. Make sure to explain how the features are different in bipedal hominids compared to the apes. a. Cranium Ape and human craniums are very different from one another. Ape craniums are designed for chewing giving them more muscles in the cranium to bite don on hard foods. These muscles apes obtain in...
    575 Words | 2 Pages
  • Rhinoceros and World - 6785 Words
    LION * Lions are the second largest big cat species in the world (behind tigers). * The average male lion weighs around 180 kg (400 lb) while the average female lion weighs around 130 kg (290 lb). * The roar of a lion can be heard from 8 kilometers (5.0 miles) away. * Most lions found in the wild live in southern and eastern parts of Africa. * Lions are very social compared to other cat species, often living in prides that feature females, offspring and a few adult males....
    6,785 Words | 30 Pages
  • Anthropologists, Paleontologists, and Archaeologists
    Walking Tall Anthropologists, Paleontologists, and Archaeologists all over the world have one common interest; learning about our ancestors and where they came from. Many believe that we have evolved from lower forms and that our closest “relatives” would be the primates of the world. Human beings actually do have a lot in common with the primate family such as, the need to be socially accepted with in a group, making of tools to get what is needed to survive, and in some cases walking up...
    658 Words | 2 Pages
  • Animal Bill of Rights - 448 Words
    Henry Rose Mrs. Pagani Period III ERWC 21 October 2013 “Body Paragraphs” PARA 1: I believe animals do not need a Bill of Rights because they already have plethora of laws that protect all of their basic needs. For example, Germany has already passed laws to protect the basic rights of Ape’s. In the article “primates” they said, “The Green Party in Germany is preparing two bills supporting the Great Ape Project”(Yong). Another way that animals already have their rights protected is, Dogs...
    448 Words | 2 Pages
  • Do Non-Human Primates Have Culture?
    Do Non-Human Primates Have Culture? September 26, 2011 Andrew Baron Do non-human primates have culture? Let’s first start off by asking ourselves; what distinguishes us from other primates? It used to be said that what distinguished us from other anthropoids was our use of tools. With new discoveries in the world of anthropology, we found that other apes such as chimpanzees use tools effectively in order to sustain their everyday life. This definition then became nullified, and a search for a...
    549 Words | 2 Pages
  • Animals: Intelligence Quotient and Similar Brain Structure
     A Change Of Heart About Animals Essay In “A Change of Heart About Animals”, Jeremy Rifkin mentioned that animals are very similar to us. He said that animals feel pain, suffer, feel stress, affection, excitement, and even love (2). However, I don’t agree with Rifkin. I think animals are not more like us than we think they do. Rifkin’s point isn’t well supported. Most of h is examples aren’t backed up by well thought evidence. Rifkin used...
    433 Words | 1 Page
  • Chimpanzee Versus Humans: Similarities & Differences
    Chimpanzee versus Humans: Similarities & Differences Since the first days of human thought into their beginnings, chimpanzees have played a vital role in showing who we were. The chimpanzee, one of the great apes, makes it home in the forests of Central and West Africa. Their long arms and legs adapt them for living in such regions as lowland jungles and mountainous regions. Humans are classified in the order Primates, and family Hominade. Within this family, human beings, our nearest...
    531 Words | 2 Pages
  • Narrative: a Trip to the Zoo and the Affects of Natural Creation
    Carlton Day III A Trip to the Zoo and the Affects of Natural Creation Far more efforts have been made to reverse my temperament imposed by surrounding circumstances than I can recollect; however, never has this been achieved so naturally, as the unprompted excursion to the North Carolina Zoo. My girlfriend and I decided after five years together that it was finally time to visit her hometown of Mocksville during our long weekend break back in late July of this year. The plan was to stay...
    1,107 Words | 3 Pages
  • Leakey's Angels - 1248 Words
    Jane Goodall Jane Goodall was born on April 3rd, 1934, in London England. She completed secondary school when she was 18 and began working. She worked as a secretary, an assistant editor in a film studio, and as a waitress to save enough money travel to Africa. When she arrived in Africa she was 23. Then in 1957 she sailed to Mombasa, where she met the famous anthropologist and paleontologist Louis Leakey; who became her mentor. In Africa Leakey and his wife, Mary Leakey had discovered what...
    1,248 Words | 4 Pages
  • Primate Social Behaviour - 1847 Words
    Primate intelligence and social behaviour Introduction Most primates spend their lives in large social groups and the social brain hypothesis posits that selection has favoured larger brains and more complex cognitive capacities as a means to cope with the challenge of social life (Silk 2007) Research in the field and laboratory shows that sophisticated social cognition underlies social behavior in primate groups. Social behaviour is behaviour and interactions that takes place between...
    1,847 Words | 6 Pages
  • Document 1 - 267 Words
    Jonadel Usita English 12 Period 5 October 10, 2014 Dear Editor, Ed Yong informs us according to the right and dignity of animals . He questioned his readers if great apes are deserving to have their own rights as a person and if so, might as well give other animals too. Animals shouldn't be mistreated or used as experimentations, but at the same time they should not have human rights. All animals deserve our respect, not human rights. No one can deny that the social behavior, abilities, and...
    267 Words | 1 Page
  • Did Humans Evolve from Apes?
    Congratulations: You are an ape. A "great ape," technically. Alongside us in this brainy family of animals are four other living species: chimpanzees, gorillas, orangutans, and bonobos (formerly called "pygmy chimpanzees"). The biological gap between us and our great ape cousins is small. At last count, only 1.23 percent of our genes differ from those of chimpanzees. But mentally, the gap between us and them is a Grand Canyon. On an average day in the life of the human species, we file...
    1,304 Words | 4 Pages
  • Kong King - 654 Words
    Andrew Brown Mr. Gingery English 1 CP 22 January 2015 Kong King You may have heard of King Kong but he was just a pebble to Kong King. Gorillas fascinated Katelyn she even had a job to study gorillas even though John was afraid of very afraid of them and that there wasn’t any gorillas close to Mankato, Minnesota except for the zoos. Katelyn liked them because they are mysterious and intelligent. John just thought they were aggressive animals. John thought that Katelyn needed a break from her...
    654 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Culture of Great Apes - 522 Words
     The Culture of Great Apes Bonobo’s and chimpanzee’s are very intelligent species. From using tools and herbal medicines to caring for and raising their young, there are more than a few things that set them apart from other species in the animal kingdom. Culture is a society’s shared and socially transmitted ideas, values, and perceptions, which are used to make sense of experience and generate behavior and are reflected in that behavior . Using this definition it seems that...
    522 Words | 2 Pages
  • Are Apes Capable of Using the Language?
    Are apes capable of using the language? During the recent time frame scientists have shown that such mammals as chimpanzees, gorillas, and orangutans are capable of learning and using ASL (American Sign Language) and several artificial languages like, for example, «Yerkish.» However, there is a controversy in how far that ability of great apes spans. There are two different groups of researchers, experimenting with language and apes, those who are in favor of a «traditional» approach, and...
    865 Words | 3 Pages
  • Early Hominids and Tools - 1416 Words
    Early Hominids and Tools Jacky Thompson ANT 101 March 20, 2013 Even though humans seem to be the most advanced creatures walking this earth, we certainly had ancestors before us. We share similar genetic information of other animals. They are what we consider early hominids. Early hominids date as far back as 6 to 8 million years ago. Just like humans, they had to have some type of culture in order to survive and make a living. Culture is defined as a dynamic adaptive process of...
    1,416 Words | 4 Pages
  • Non-Human Primate Conservation: Effects on Both Non-Human Primates and Humans
    When viewing the topic of non-human primate conservation many issues arise as the population is constantly growing and therefore requires more accessible space for building and other land uses. The issue of non-human primate conservation is a large issue in various parts of the developing world, as they are home to numerous non-human primates and as the developing the human population is growing and the non-human primate population is decreasing with the decrease in forest...
    1,240 Words | 7 Pages
  • Psychology 100 - 993 Words
    PSYC100 Oct 28, 2013 Jiyoon Lee After Watching “The Project Nim” I decided to watch and write about “The Project Nim”. Because, I have heard about the movie several times so it was kind of familiar to me. “The Project Nim” is a documentary movie based on a real story of experiment and observation about a little chimpanzee named Nim Chimpski. This experiment headed by behavioral psychologist Herbert Terrace and the purpose of the experiment was to deny Noam Chomsky’s theory that using...
    993 Words | 3 Pages
  • Rise of the Planet of Apes and Biotechnology
    Rise of the Planet of the Apes Rise of the planet of the Apes is about a scientist who is trying to find a cure for Alzheimer’s by testing chimps with various treatments. One of the treatments works, a little too well, and lets the chimp learn things on a faster scale than human themselves. The chimp is at first obedient and loved by the scientist, until the authorities take him away to a facility where he feels abused and neglected. He then creates his own “army” of chimps to rebel against the...
    313 Words | 1 Page
  • fdksjhfnejsdf - 268 Words
    ibsdfklma;kfbcmnvx,ztry was mesmerized by the story of Sandra Herold, a 70-year-old widow in Stamford, Conn., whose 14-year-old, 200-pound chimpanzee, Travis, horribly mauled a close friend of the owner, tearing off her face. Ms. Herold, whose daughter had died in a car accident, had developed a relationship with him that went far beyond the ordinary owner-pet dynamic. She referred to Travis as her son, spoke of sleeping and bathing with him when he was small, and, in an interview with Jeff...
    268 Words | 1 Page
  • The Hairy Ape - 512 Words
    The Hairy Ape The childhood of Yank had been a complete distressing childhood that Yank never wanted to talk about. Yank had gone through horrible moments when he was a child. Listening to his father who was abusive was a misery for Yank as a kid. Yank’s parents used to fight severely every night that they would break the furniture. Yank left his home when his mother died because of tremens. Yank was so tired of his father’s punishment and beatings that he had no other option but to run away...
    512 Words | 2 Pages
  • Genius - 862 Words
    EAR West Side HS Science Credit Recovery Ape Genius Name ____________________________________ FG ________________________ Credit Recovery Course ________________________________________________ Teacher ________________________________ Year/Cycle _______________ Part 1: Background 
One of the ongoing discussions in behavioral research is about whether the non-human great apes (chimps, bonobos, orangutans, and gorillas) are as intelligent as human beings. Intelligence refers to the...
    862 Words | 6 Pages
  • Anthro Paper Done - 3281 Words
    Jacob Mamiye 12/6/2014 Anthropology Professor Mwaria Social Organization, Characteristics and Behaviors of the Great Apes 1 Compare and contrast the social organization of the great apes (chimps, bonobos, and gorilla’s orangutans) and savannah baboons. What accounts for these differences? The social organization of baboons is one of the most intensely studied of the primates. There is only one defined level of social organization in savanna baboons, the stable group of...
    3,281 Words | 9 Pages
  • Primates - 734 Words
    Something About Primates PRIMATES share many characteristics with other animals, but they differentiate as a distinct group from other mammals with certain special features. On a CLASSIFICATION chart, a chart that organizes diversity into categories and indicates evolutionary relationships, primates are categorized under the Phylum CHORDATA, containing all VERTEBRATES (animals with segmented spinal columns), and are also split into 2 suborders: HAPLORHINI, which includes lemurs and lorises and...
    734 Words | 2 Pages
  • Research Paper Ebola - 91 Words
    Ebola, also known as hemorrhagic fever, is a disease caused by infection with one of the virus strains. It can cause disease in humans and primates such as monkeys, gorillas, and chimpanzees. Ebola was first identified near the Ebola River in 1976 and occasionally spurred outbreaks in Africa. Recently, the Ebola Virus has been confirmed to be diagnosed in the United States. The first case in the United States was discovered in a man who traveled to Dallas, Texas from Liberia. Since the...
    91 Words | 1 Page
  • Misconception - 350 Words
    Misconceptions: Did humans evolve from monkeys? No, humans did not evolve from monkeys, but did we evolve from apes then? Well turns out even though we are more closely related to apes than monkeys, we still didn’t evolve from them. So who or what did humans evolve from? Scientists believe that humans share a common ancestor with modern African apes (gorillas, chimpanzees). This ancestor lived five to eight million years ago, but hold on if this was true wouldn’t this...
    350 Words | 1 Page
  • Humane Society - 356 Words
    In discussion of inhumane treatment, a controversial issue is whether animals are entitled to their rights. While some argue that only humans have rights, others contend that animals should have the same privileges as humans. The author of “A Change of Heart about Animals,” Jeremy Rifkin, claims that animals should have better treatment. Rifkin rhetorically changes one’s view on this subject without the consent of the reader. Rifkin begins by showing the animals’ human qualities, then giving a...
    356 Words | 1 Page
  • Tarzan of the Apes - 513 Words
    Tarzan of the Apes Character Analysis Tarzan of the Apes was written by Edgar Rice Burroughs and it was published in 1914. Tarzan is a human that was raised in the African jungle by great apes. Tarzan was a part of a tribe. None of the apes in the tribe like Terkoz, their evil king. Tarzan was smart enough to leave the tribe and his last words to the apes were, “If you have a chief who is cruel, do not do as the other apes do, and attempt, any one of you, to pit yourself against him...
    513 Words | 2 Pages
  • De Sica's Film Say About Our Dependence on Other Human Beings
    In the movie of Bicycle Thieves, it said that our dependence on other human beings are useless and not solve anything because human are only care on their own matter without thinking other human’s problem. They are egoist. In my opinion, it depends because human can depends upon other human being when the one who is being relied is willing to help without any hesitation. For example, the father and his family was depend to each other because they live in poverty and need each other. However,...
    551 Words | 2 Pages
  • Personhood for Primates - 2464 Words
    Henry is an outgoing 26-year-old who enjoys painting, watching wildlife documentaries and eating bananas. He’s emotional, empathic and self-aware and he shares 98.4 per cent of your DNA. Henry is also a chimpanzee, and so has no more rights in law than a car or a television. I am one body in a growing number of people want to change all that. Campaigners across the world are attempting to persuade governments to grant great apes elementary “human rights”. We argue that great apes are enough...
    2,464 Words | 7 Pages
  • Planet of the Apes - 1830 Words
    Pierre Boulle was born on February 20, 1912 in Avignon, France. His father, Eugene Boulle, was a brilliant lawyer who taught him his sense of humor and open- mindedness and his mother, Therese Seguin, was born in a family of printers. Pierre’s parents raised him to be Catholic although later in his life he became agnostic. He studied science at the Sorbonne and then entered the Ecole Supérieure d'Electricité de Paris. Pierre Boulle graduated college with a degree in engineering in 1932 and...
    1,830 Words | 4 Pages
  • Chimpanzee and Animals - 396 Words
    Do Animals Have Language? Two sources of evidence supporting the viewpoint that animals have the capacity for language: Many scientists have experimented with animals, to prove that they do have the capacity to communicate. For example, Beatrice and Allen Gardner trained a chimpanzee named Washoe to use about one hundred and sixty signs, including signs for “apple,” “tickle,” “flower,” and “more.” Washoe even learned to combine signs into simple phrasese, such as “more fruit” and “gimme...
    396 Words | 2 Pages
  • Homo Sapiens and the Great Apes
    Homo Sapiens and The Great Apes Imagine walking through the zoo and approaching the habitat of the great apes. Suddenly, you find yourself thinking about how different you are from these creatures. They can’t speak, they aren’t advanced, and don’t wear clothes. It is at this moment that you start to feel superior to these animals. Realizing this, you start to believe that you are in no way similar to these animals. This description is a common belief for most humans, the idea that we are in no...
    852 Words | 3 Pages
  • Response to Ishmael - 451 Words
    On first impression while reading Ishmael, the fact a gorilla is teaching the reader about the human race is almost insulting. At second glance however, one realizes the primate has a better perspective on human action. Always viewing our civilization from afar, he is able to notice certain aspects of our nature that are so natural to us; we are blind to their destructiveness. Although some of Ishmael's analogies may seem far-fetched, the points he makes with them are frighteningly true. The...
    451 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Apes - 1782 Words
    For other uses, see Ape (disambiguation). For an explanation of very similar terms, see Hominidae. Hominoids or Apes Temporal range: Late Oligocene–Holocene PreЄЄOSDCPTJKPgN Orang Utan, Semenggok Forest Reserve, Sarawak, Borneo, Malaysia.JPG Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus) Scientific classification e Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Primates Suborder: Haplorrhini Infraorder: Simiiformes Parvorder: Catarrhini Superfamily: Hominoidea Gray, 1825 Type...
    1,782 Words | 7 Pages
  • Primate and Anthropology Primates - 1373 Words
    Lori Watkins Anthropology Primates Primates belong to the biological order “Primates” that include all species related to lemurs, monkeys, apes, and humans. Non-human primates are found all over the world, but are primarily centralized in Central and South America, Africa, and Southern Asia. Primates are divided into three main groups: prosimians, Old World and New World monkeys. Prosimians are the most ancestral extant primates and represent forms that were ancestral to monkeys,...
    1,373 Words | 4 Pages
  • Can we understand HUMANS by studying Nonhuman Primates?
    The study of non-human primates in order to gain an understanding of human beings is so complex; I feel it’s almost an impossible argument. There may be some instances of similarities in humans and non-human primates but it’s like asking a 3rd grader to figure out a calculus problem. It’s that diverse! Humans are a complicated and very unique species. We can barely understand our own differences; consequently trying to compare one to the other is insignificant. There are so many skills and...
    1,141 Words | 3 Pages
  • Helping the Poor! - 420 Words
    Helping the poor! The point of helping someone in need is that the person who you helped could now be living the life always telling others about you, praising you, but for example if you haven't helped out a person in need he or she will be living a life of terror. They won't have money, food, and a family. That's why I think it's important to keep care of others! But to be honest, would it really kill you to donate a low amount of money a month. A fifty riyals a month to any charity helps,...
    420 Words | 2 Pages
  • Nonhuman Primates - 1127 Words
    The Extraordinary Kinship and Differences Between Humans and Nonhuman Primates If you were to look at an ape right now, you would find an ongoing list of both similarities and differences they have with humans. Besides the obvious similarities and differences, apes and our nonhuman primates are just like us in so many extraordinary ways. However, there are various skills and abilities we possess that they don’t, and vice versa. Moreover, for the past fifty years anthropologists, scholars and...
    1,127 Words | 3 Pages
  • reflection in archaeology - 609 Words
    Hominid and hominin – what’s the difference? The terms ‘hominid’ and ‘hominin’ are frequently used in human evolution. New definitions The most commonly used recent definitions are: Hominid – the group consisting of all modern and extinct Great Apes (that is, modern humans, chimpanzees, gorillas and orang-utans plus all their immediate ancestors). Hominin – the group consisting of modern humans, extinct human species and all our immediate ancestors (including members of the genera Homo,...
    609 Words | 2 Pages
  • Analysis on the Movie Instinct - 1124 Words
    Instinct –About A Mere Illusion One of the two main characters in this movie is Dr. Ethan Powell, an anthropologist. The study of primatology is present in this movie, because Dr. Powell is shown several times living with the mountain gorillas. He gains their trust by adapting to the way they live and interact. I think a little bit of cultural anthropology is also present because although he is studying primates, I believe they have a culture and Dr. Powell has adapted to their nature. The...
    1,124 Words | 3 Pages
  • ANIMAL INTELLIGENCE - 532 Words
    ANIMAL INTELLIGENCE MUHAMMAD DZUL HUSSAINI BIN HANAFI KB1309FD4722 CHIMPANZEE INTRO Chimpanzees, sometimes colloquially Chimps, are two extant hominid species of apes in the genus Pan. The Congo River divides the native habitats of the two species. Chimpanzees are members of the family Hominidae, along with gorillas, humans, and orangutans. Chimpanzees split from the human branch of the family about four to six million years ago. Chimpanzees are the closest living relatives to humans, being...
    532 Words | 4 Pages
  • King Kong - 2065 Words
    Research Paper In almost all movies there is a beautiful heroine that always catches the eye of a protagonist who falls madly in love. Though not all protagonists are handsome men/women; such as Beauty and the Beast, King Kong, and Penelope, all these stars lack the appearance of normal people. Their appearance ranges from a beast, an ape, or a pig, but true love is what can set them free. There are major differences and similarities between each film, but only one major theme; love. King...
    2,065 Words | 5 Pages
  • Is Man Inherently Evil?
    Man, inherently evil or good? A question that only opinions can answer. What is evil? Killing 'is evil,' rape 'is evil,' torture 'is evil,' and man 'is evil.' History and a certain familiar book show evidence that supports that man is 'evil.' "The evil that men do lives after them, the good is oft. interred with their bones," a quote from Shakespeare. The 'good and just' deeds done dies with the people who accomplished it. Nothing is inherently good. Scientists theorize that humans evolved...
    535 Words | 2 Pages
  • humans are unique - 330 Words
    Anthropology • The Human Species has evolved from numerous primates throughout the past millions of years through natural selection • Natural selection: Organisms that best adapt to their environment to survive produce offspring. • Through natural selection humans have characteristics that make them Unique • Humans are the only mammals that are bipedal • Bipedalism: using two legs for walking • Other primates such as chimpanzees, and gorillas have the ability to walk...
    330 Words | 2 Pages
  • Accused: Eye Color and Man
    Accused The small figure bent over a table place intentionally sideways in the center of a small, dirt-floored room. The only light source that allowed him to see was the little light that trickled in through the filth stained window. As his hands worked, sewing the soft, bristled fur, a chorus of childish voices found its way into the house from outside. “Ring around the rosy,” they sang. The figure couldn’t help but to cringe at the intricate lyrics, knowing their horrible meaning....
    2,015 Words | 6 Pages
  • Human Geography in Sub-Saharan Africa
    Human geography in Sub-Saharan Africa People originated in Africa also known as the “cradle of humankind”. There are fossilized footprints of Homo sapiens’s earlier ancestors called the hominid Australopithecus, which is the evidence that humans have been in this region the longest. Genetic evidence shows these humans are the ancestors of all modern humans. Because people have lived here the longest there are more diseases. Several of these diseases can be transferred from insects or animals...
    369 Words | 1 Page
  • Humans vs. Other Primates
    Humans vs. Other Primates Arhama Syed October 14, 2011 Introduction to Psychology, Sociology, and Anthropology Mr. Kerr Even though humans could be the leaders of the world wielding the most power, are we that much different from other primates? No, we are not. Of course humans are different, but definitely not unique. We share too many characteristics to other primates like the chimpanzees, bonobos and gorillas. Characteristics like culture, speech, communication, having social classes...
    1,399 Words | 4 Pages
  • Koko the Gorrilla - 998 Words
    Jocelyn bolanos Anthropology 118 22 October 2012 Koko the Gorrilla Koko is an extraordinary gorilla that is able to communicate to humans by the use of American Sign Language. Although there may be many linguists who discredit this notion, AOl chat was able to provide transcripts between penny, who is Koko’s translator, and Koko the gorilla through the use of American Sign Language The transcripts provide evidence of gestures, behaviors, and thoughts that Koko does through...
    998 Words | 3 Pages