Dysthymia Essays & Research Papers

Best Dysthymia Essays

  • Dysthymia and the Elderly - 657 Words
    Dysthymia and Elderly Jacob Wenger Dysthymia is defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR), as “semichronic, smoldering mood disorder with ongoing waxing and waning symptoms. Symptoms must be present for at least two years in adults and for at least one year in children and adolescents.” (Sansone & Sansone, 2009, p. 14) The disorder is further characterized as requiring symptoms lasting two years in adults and one...
    657 Words | 2 Pages
  • Week 3 Paper Psy 450
     Sharp hospital provides for a wide area of mental health issues by providing, and understanding the complicated needs associated with in the mental health field. Mood disorder is simply a singular branch which will be focused on, with a hope to show a more focused look into the inner functioning of the Sharp hospital system. The Sharp Web page links a good front page to their mental health care site wherein are listed all psychological disorders their facilities are capable of...
    827 Words | 3 Pages
  • How to Read - 1002 Words
    At the turn of the millennium, hurricanes, tropical storms, and dramatic temperatures ruled planet Earth. In the 2004 Hurricane season, four storms affected Florida which is the only time in recorded history a catastrophe like this has happened. In 2005, Hurricane Katrina wreaked havoc in the New Orleans area, bringing over one hundred billion dollars of damages; making thousands of people homeless, mostly minorities, and killing many others. The Federal Government, unprepared for this...
    1,002 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Glamorization of Mental Illness Among Teenagers
    Maren Dennison Pd. 4 11/25/13 When visiting any well-known social network geared towards teens and adolescents, it takes but a few minutes to encounter a post that glorifies a disturbed mind. However, being mentally disturbed does not make a person beautiful. Many teens and adolescents believe that fabricating and self-diagnosing certain mental illnesses are a way to gain peer acceptance and to stand apart from the crowd. Although this belief may seem harmless, the glamorization of...
    1,637 Words | 5 Pages
  • All Dysthymia Essays

  • Psychological Disorders - 1415 Words
    Psychological Disorder Analysis Psychological Disorder Analysis This psychological analysis is about Maria a 42 year old Hispanic female who comes into the mental health clinic complaining of feeling jumpy all of the time, she has trouble sleeping and is enable to concentrate on her work as an accountant. These symptoms are causing problems for her at work. There can be many causes for her symptoms but to get to the root of her issue a clinical assessment, diagnoses, and proper treatment...
    1,415 Words | 4 Pages
  • MOOD DISORDER - 754 Words
    In today's society, people are often faced with challenges and obstacles no matter who they are. Everyone goes through a period of time where they are feeling unsatisfied or upset with an outcome of an event that has happened in their life. This type of feeling becomes dangerous when you start to notice changes in a person's behavior that can harmfully affect them. Building up stress from all these disappointments can lead to mental illnesses such as mood disorders. When changes in mood and...
    754 Words | 2 Pages
  • Dysthymic Disorder - 502 Words
    Dysthymic disorder also known as Neurotic depression is a depressive mood disorder. It usually is current and happens every day or two years. Dysthymia is more common among African Americans and Mexican Americans than among Caucasians. Womaen are twice as likely to suffer from this depreesive mood disorder than males. Women are diagnosed with dysthymic disorder at two to three times the rate as men. The cause of this may be the hormonal fluctuation from the menstrual cycle, pregnancy, and...
    502 Words | 2 Pages
  • Psychological Causes of Depression - 701 Words
    Psychological Causes of Depression The actual causes of depression are still unknown today but there are a few theories that could help explain them. It is widely believed by psychologists and scientists that all mental disorders are brought about by a complex correlation of psychological, biological, and social factors. A serious loss, chronic illness, relationship problem, work stress, family crisis, financial setback, or any unwelcome life change can ignite a depressive disorder...
    701 Words | 3 Pages
  • Psychological Disorder Analysis - 1517 Words
    Psychological Disorder Analysis PSY/270 March 20, 2011 Psychological Disorder Analysis Marla is a 42-year-old Hispanic female who comes to the mental health clinic complaining of having trouble sleeping, feeling "jumpy all of the time," and experiencing an inability to concentrate. These symptoms are causing problems for her at work, where she is an accountant (Axia College). In order to determine Marla condition a clinical interview must be conducted so more information in regards to...
    1,517 Words | 4 Pages
  • Psychological Disorder - 473 Words
    Ashley Norton Psy-270 Final Project- Marla’s Disorder Due-Sunday Dysthymia Disorder Marla is a 42-year-old Hispanic female who comes to the mental health clinic complaining of having trouble sleeping, feeling "jumpy all of the time," and experiencing an inability to concentrate. These symptoms are causing problems for her at work, where she is an accountant. Before I could tell Marla’s that she may be suffering from Dysthymic Disorder I would need to really take a look in her life and...
    473 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Perks of Being a Wallflower: Depression
    Synopsis and Introduction to Charlie The Perks of Being a Wallflower is a coming-of-age epistolary novel written by American novelist Stephen Chbosky set in the suburbs of Pittsburgh in the 1990's (Wikipedia, 2012). It follows the life of a teenage boy named Charlie. Charlie is a 15 year old boy who is on the verge of beginning his freshman year in high school. He lives with both his parents and his sister in the suburbs of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. One look at Charlie may render him a...
    1,848 Words | 6 Pages
  • Mental Health - 2986 Words
    “What is Mental Health?” Within this essay, I will examine the definition of mental health, as well as it’s connection in our daily lives. I will be discussing a particular mental health problem which is depression under mood disorder. By examining a scenario of a patient who I have looked after who is suffering from this mental problem, and the available treatment options. I am please to focus in this topic that made a real difference to people lives, most especially to the patients who are...
    2,986 Words | 8 Pages
  • Psychological Disorder Analysis - 1797 Words
    PSYCHOLOGICAL DISORDER ANALYSIS Psychological Disorder Analysis Amy Verhagen Axia College of University of Phoenix The diagnosis given to Maria is Dysthymic Disorder. Maria has been having trouble sleeping at night, feeling ‘jumpy’, and not able to concentrate. I suspect this has been going on for a while and possibly co-occurs with other psychological symptoms. Further questioning Maria about her past and present symptom onset will help in confirming this diagnosis to help treat her...
    1,797 Words | 5 Pages
  • Depression in the Workplace - 836 Words
     Depression in the Workplace Shannon Courson Everest College Phoenix Depression in the workplace carries a huge stigma, both internally and externally, making it difficult for sufferers largely because of the negativity of the disease and has a need that needs to be addressed by employers and coworkers. Depression can cause employees to be less productive, accident prone and uninterested in their duties. Because of this, it has serious cost to the employer, in the form of...
    836 Words | 3 Pages
  • Splendor in the Grass – Phycological Analysis
    SPLENDOR IN THE GRASS – PHYCOLOGICAL ANALYSIS “Splendor In The Grass” Psychological Analysis Author Note This paper was prepared for Psychology 1, The film, Splendor in the Grass, presents us the argument between respectable behavior and human desire pushing both lovers to physical and psychological collapse. The relationship between Deanie and Bud as a love struck couple begins in a 1920’s small Kansas town which features the unbearable beauty of Wilma Dean “Deanie” Loomis...
    981 Words | 3 Pages
  • depression eassy - 1383 Words
    Denisse Perdomo Dr. Daria Boeninger INTR-D 100G 12/11/2014 Depression Depression is understood as a mood disorder that causes feeling of sadness and loss of interest. Also, depression not only involves the mind, it also involves the body and thoughts. It affects the way you use to do your personals habits. Also, it affects the way you feel about yourself, and the way you think in general. People with this disease tents to feel, that everything is all over the place. Depression is a very...
    1,383 Words | 4 Pages
  • Richard A. Friedman's Born To Be Happy, Through a Twist of Human Hard Wire: Article Analysis
    RHT 101 March 2nd 2012 Richard A. Friedman The article Born to Be Happy, Through a Twist of Human Hard Wire by Richard A Friedman addresses both psychiatric and scientific aspects of physiological disorders. The main concern of this article in tales what makes individuals happy or obtain happiness and also explaining how psychiatric illnesses alter their happiness. Friedman’s main disorder explained is a temperament disorder called hyperthymia a mental illness that is rare in America....
    1,127 Words | 3 Pages
  • PSYCHOTHERAPY - 419 Words
    PSYCHOTHERAPY Psychological Intervention: Promotion, Prevention and Pdychotherapy 1. Characteristics of Intervention Goals of Intervention Process of Intervention Timing of Intervention 2. Promotion and Prevention Violence Against Children and Women Major Depressive Disorder CHARACTERISTICS OF INTERVENTIONS: GOAL OF INTERVENTION CHARACTERISTICS OF INTERVENTIONS: PROCESS OF INTERVENTION It begins when a patient first contacts a therapist, and ends at the conclusion of the therapy. The...
    419 Words | 3 Pages
  • Mood Disorders - 1377 Words
    MOOD DISORDERS A 32-year old female Janice Butterfield, who came in at the insistence of her husband Jed Butterfield for a consultation concerning her suicidal attempt due to dysthymia. American Heritage Dictionary defines that dysthymia is a chronic disturbance of mood lasting at least two years in adults or one year in children, characterized by recurrent periods of mild depression and such symptoms. Although the symptoms of dysthymia may be less intense than those of depression,...
    1,377 Words | 4 Pages
  • Mental Health and Psychiatry Level 3
    Mental Health Psychiatry. Assignment 1. 1.1 Analyse why men are more likely to describe the physical symptoms of depression, rather than the emotional ones, when seeking treatment. Men are more likely to commit suicide because their reluctance to seek help e.g. on average, men go to their GP half as often as women. Approximately 3 million men are affected and the figure rises after the age of 70. Men of all ages, ethnic origins and walks of life get depressed but men generally describe the...
    1,631 Words | 5 Pages
  • Issues Related to the Classification and Diagnosis of Depression
    Discuss issues related to the classification and/or diagnosis of depression 10% of the British population at any one time is believed to have depression. This mental illness is made up of several different classifications forming different types of depression, such as major depressive disorder (the most commonly known type) and post-natal depression, which occurs in women after giving birth. For each person suffering from depression the trigger may be different and the symptoms may be...
    1,262 Words | 4 Pages
  • Beh 225 Week 8 Assignment
    Running Header: ASSIGNMENT DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT Assignment: Diagnosis and Treatment XXXXXXXXXX March XX, XXXX Axia College, University of Phoenix Instructor Diagnosis and Treatment For many Americans it is difficult to come to terms with any type of medical diagnosis. Some may know the warning signs and simply ignore them. Unfortunately mental disorders have plagued many people for years. Going without diagnosis and treatment can have devastating effects to...
    917 Words | 4 Pages
  • Depression and Its Effects on Motivation
    Depression And Its Effects On Motivation   Depression is one of the most frequently seen mental disorders. It affects approximately 9.5% of the United States population. (National Institute of Mental Health) It can cause an individual to be unable to experience pleasure in acts that they would have previously enjoyed immensely. This can cause them to fall into a slump or motivational deficit which can in turn have a huge impact on their day to day lifestyle. Depression is defined by...
    1,210 Words | 4 Pages
  • Nature vs Nurture - Depression
    For years there has been an ongoing debate of nature versus nurture. Nature refers to genetics, inheritance and genes, and nurture refers to characteristics shaped by one’s environmental influences. For the purpose of this paper, the development of depression will be researched in terms of the nature versus nurture debate. Studies show that while some people are genetically predisposed to mood disorders, many people develop them through environmental factors. However, a different study looked at...
    818 Words | 2 Pages
  • How We Define Depression
    How We Define Depression Depression is a word of many meanings and can be defined in diverse ways for different people. Depression can be defined as a serious, long-term condition that people wish they could get out of. However, One could even say that, at times, depression is a natural and possibly even healthy occurrence. If we don’t ever feel gloomy now and again, then how could we ever differentiate feeling happy from sad? I believe the main idea of how people view depression is a...
    706 Words | 2 Pages
  • Major Depression - 1216 Words
    Major Depression 2 Many individuals are faced with challenging times throughout their lifetime. Although a Psychological disorder like Major Depression can profoundly alter both your state of mind and your body. Major Depression is one of the most complex psychological disorders out there, which is why it is crucial that people are aware of the characteristics and proper treatments. Major depression is characterized under the category of a “mood disorder” that has a harmful effect on...
    1,216 Words | 4 Pages
  • Major Approaches to Clinical Psychology
    MAJOR APPROACHES TO CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY Psychology 480 INTRODUCTION  D e pre s siv e D is o rde r s  Major Depressive Disorder  Dysthymic Disorder  Bipolar Disorder  M ajo r ap p ro ach e s t o cli ni cal ps y ch o lo g y  Psychodynamic  Origins and Goals  Treatment and Strategies  Eff ectiveness of treatment  Cognitive/Behavioral  Origins and Goals  Treatment and Strategies  Eff ectiveness of treatment  Humanistic  Origins and Goals  Treatment and Strategies  Eff...
    721 Words | 6 Pages
  • Positive Psychology and Depression - 3563 Words
    Positive Psychology in the Treatment of Major Depression Positive psychology is a strengths-oriented, positively focused approach to human behaviors and thoughts that is relatively recent to the overall field of psychology. Previous schools of thought had always focused on the abnormalities, weaknesses, and pathologies of people. Positive psychology is an exceptionally new branch of psychology and aims at making life more fulfilling, enjoyable, and happy instead of just tolerable; they wish...
    3,563 Words | 10 Pages
  • Psy 270 Final - 1485 Words
    Final PSY 270 PSY 270 9/11/2011 Pamela J Reeves Final PSY 270 The subject (Marla) is a 42 year old female who is seeking help from the mental health clinic for a variety of symptoms which the subject believes is causing her distress. These symptoms include: trouble sleeping, feeling jumpy all of the time, and an in ability to concentrate. The subject, whose complaint is a decreased performance at work, feels these symptoms to be the cause. It is apparent that a concern for the...
    1,485 Words | 4 Pages
  • Depression and Hyperhidrosis - 1968 Words
    Welcome to WritePoint, the automated review system that recognizes errors most commonly made by university students in academic essays. The system embeds comments into your paper and suggests possible changes in grammar and style. Please evaluate each comment carefully to ensure that the suggested change is appropriate for your paper, but remember that your instructor's preferences for style and format prevail. You will also need to review your own citations and references since WritePoint...
    1,968 Words | 7 Pages
  • Questions on Abnormal Psychology - 4710 Words
    Part 1 of 4 - 12.0 Points Question 1 of 50 1.0 Points According to the integrative model, which of the following factors influence the onset and maintenance of somatic symptom disorders? A.Biological, psychological, social and cultural factors. B.Psychological, cultural and perceptual factors. C.Medical, sociological, and psychological factors. D.Cultural, medical, and gender factors. Answer Key: A Question 2 of 50 1.0 Points Concerning the cause of dissociative disorders, _______...
    4,710 Words | 18 Pages
  • Abnormal Psychology Robin Williams
    Name: Reinaldo George Professor: Mrs. Silvermane Course: Abnormal Psychology Date: Wednesday 20th August, 2014 What was it about his death that has brought so much attention to people and the media? Anytime a celebrity of high status like Robin Williams dies, it is going to gain massive media attention. Recent news of his suicide has shaken many people to their core, causing mass shock that can be felt around the world. Ever since word of his death hit the newswire, interest in Robin...
    571 Words | 2 Pages
  • Informative Speech Outline - 615 Words
    Informative Speech Outline “Depression” INTRODUCTION I. Good evening everyone! Many of us have face depression sometime before or maybe facing it now. II. This is something that most of us feel at one time or another in our lives. III. I have taken some time to research three websites all about depression as well as have experienced it myself in my life. IV. Depression is the most common mental disorder and according to the National Institute of Mental Health, about 9.5 percent of the...
    615 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Implications of Anti-Depressants on Todays Society
     The Implications of Anti-Depressants on Todays Society November, 20th/2013 PSYC-1200-015 The Implications of Anti-Depressants on Todays Society Depression is a mental/mood disorder or now known as a biological disease, which is widely described as a persistent low mood behavior, and is usually accompanied by low self-esteem and or by a loss of interest in normally enjoyable activities. So why are doctors prescribing medication that...
    1,770 Words | 6 Pages
  • Assignment: Clinical Assessment - 1152 Words
    Assignment: Clinical Assessment Mr. and Mrs. Lawson brought their 4-year-old adopted daughter, Clara, to see Dr. Mason, a psychiatrist. Clara was polite in greeting Dr. Mason, but did not smile and kept her gaze down as she took a seat. Mr. and Mrs. Lawson sat next to Clara and began explaining their concerns. They described Clara as a quiet child who has recently begun throwing temper tantrums, during which she is inconsolable. Her sleep and eating patterns have changed, and she no longer...
    1,152 Words | 4 Pages
  • Final Paper Depression 5
    PSY 102 November 30, 2014 Depression Depression is a mood disorder that deprives an individual of the ability to lead a life that is filled with happiness, joy and contentment. The effects of depression can be destructive on the mental abilities, physical health and emotional stability of those that suffer with this disorder. Individuals may choose to not seek help due to embarrassment or a lack of admitting there is a problem. Others may choose to seek help to end the cycle of unanswered...
    1,140 Words | 4 Pages
  • Depression - 447 Words
    ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY CASE STUDY 3 MAJOR DEPRESSION 1. Major depressive disorder (MDD) has been linked to many causes, including biologic and genetic, cognitive, behavioral, and social and interpersonal factors. Which factors do you believe are the most important to the development of MDD? In addition to their roles as causal factors, having MDD can lead to substantial changes in these same domains. How does having MDD affect a person’s thoughts, behaviors, and social interactions? What...
    447 Words | 2 Pages
  • Analogue Studies Do Not Aid Depression Knowledge
    The use of distressed college students as analogues for depression research, however, is not sufficient in meaningfully advancing our current knowledge of depression and its treatment. Due to ease of access and convenience, the excessive reliance on this sample has made some researchers neglect crucial and noteworthy differences. This paper will address these critical differences including severity and symptomatology, issues of generalizability and problems with the psychometrics. Lastly, this...
    1,963 Words | 6 Pages
  • Holden Caufield Doctor Prognosis
    Holden Caulfield’s Doctor Analysis Patient: Holden Caulfield Doctor: Carolina Beltran Date: May 18, 2009 Abstract: After studying the patient, Holden Caulfield, for several days in daily therapeutic sessions, I have concluded that the patient is suffering from Dysthemic Disorder. A person who has Dysthymic Disorder generally has had a...
    864 Words | 3 Pages
  • Week 2 Discussion Board – Electroconvulsive Therapy Treatment
    Week 2 Discussion Board – Electroconvulsive Therapy Treatment PROMPT: Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT) is still utilized to treat atypical depression. Shock therapy has had such a dark history in mental health. Find and read at least two articles on either the history of ECT or its use in treating depression. Cite those articles in your response. Share your feelings and thoughts regarding its use today. Be sure to discuss the information you gleaned from the articles. Reminder: You will be...
    667 Words | 3 Pages
  • CAFS IRP - Depression in youth
    Patrick burgess IRP Depression and its affects of youth Table of contents Abstract: 5 Acknowledgements: 7 Introduction: 8 Depression is a psychiatric disorder characterized by an inability to concentrate, insomnia, loss of appetite, feelings of extreme sadness, guilt, helplessness and hopelessness, and thoughts of death experienced by an individual for over two weeks and it affects the following needs listed in the Groups in Context unit. 8 Methods of data collection: 13...
    5,603 Words | 17 Pages
  • Mood Disorder, an Umbrella Term to a Host of Disorders
    CU261P Mood disorder: this is a group of diagnosis in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM IV TR) which classifies mental health, this particular one is when a person’s mood is seen to be the underlying cause of mental health issues. This umbrellas a host of disorders, such as; Bipolar Disease (BD), Major Depressive Disorder (MDD), and also less severe depressions such as dysthymic or cyclothymic. Some mood disorders can be substance induced, (due to someone’s drug...
    1,228 Words | 4 Pages
  • Strategies for Overcoming Depression Psych Central
    8/20/2015 Strategies for Overcoming Depression | Psych Central Search term or ZIP code Home Conditions News & Experts Find Help Quizzes Menu: Research & Resources Pro Where to? Depression Depression Overview Depression Quiz Loneliness Quiz Blog: Depression on My Mind General Symptoms of Depression Specific Symptoms of a Depressive Episode Treatment Options Living with Depression Depression Library Dozens of articles Ask the Therapist about Depression Ask Others about...
    1,455 Words | 9 Pages
  • Blessing s Personal Response to Hamlet
     Loss of Awareness (A Personal Essay in Response to Hamlet) Blessing Adedijo Throughout history mankind has proved time and time again that we will continue to make the same mistakes. We have a tendency to choose the same course of action, which more often than not proves fatal. Margaret J. Wheatley accurately remarked that, “without reflection, we go blindly on our way, creating more unintended consequences, and failing to achieve anything useful.” There is a certain self-awareness the human...
    700 Words | 2 Pages
  • Discuss two biological explanations of
    Discuss two biological explanations of depression (8+16 marks) AO1: One biological explanation for depression is family studies. Family studies have proved that having a first-degree relative with depression appears to be a risk factor of depression. These studies select people who already have the depression (the probands) and examine whether other members of their family have been, or might be diagnosed with depression. Research has found that around 20% of such relatives have depression...
    858 Words | 3 Pages
  • Understanding Bipolar Disorder in Children
    Understanding Bipolar Disorder in Children by Patricia Oakes November 6, 2012 TABLE OF CONTENTS ABSTRACT……………………………………………………………………………..i INTRODUCTION………………………………………………………………………1 FINDING AND CONCLUSIONS……………………………………………………..2 LIVING DAILY LIFE: HELPING YOUR TEEN AT HOME AND SCHOOL……2 HOW CAN YOU WORK TOGETHER WITH YOUR CHILD’S TEACHERS?....3 SCHOOL & THE CHILD WITH BIPOLAR DISORDER………………………….4 DISORDERS THAT CAN ACCOMPANY BIPOLAR DISORDER……………….5 WORKING WITH THE...
    4,023 Words | 14 Pages
  • living by the day - 565 Words
    Occasionally all humans experience emotions that bring them down making them feel sad. Whether it was because your favorite team lost or you and your significant other had a dispute. Feeling this kind of emotion is normal for humans from time time to time. These kind of feelings aren’t temporary, they usually last a couple of days and you go on with your everyday life. According to the Mayo Clinic, Depression is a mood disorder that causes a persistent feeling of...
    565 Words | 2 Pages
  • Beck's Cognitive Theory of Depression
    Beck’s Cognitive Theory of Depression Abnormal Psychology Aaron T. Beck’s Psychological Theory of Depression Depression is a “clinical syndrome” that affects many people in our society today, and has been documented for influencing humanity for over two-thousand-years (Beck, 1967, p. 3). Various pursuits have been initiated in effort to understand, diagnose, and treat this prevailing disorder. Although numerous attempts have been executed and several studies have assisted in the...
    2,063 Words | 8 Pages
  • Related Literature about Depression
     RELATED LITERATURE ABOUT DEPRESSION Submitted by: Marjorie D. Panti Submitted to: Mr. Enrique Soriano What is depression? What causes depression? Depression, also known as major depression, clinical depression or major depressive disorder is a medical illness that causes a constant feeling of sadness and lack of interest. Depression affects how the person feels, behaves and thinks. Depression can lead to emotional and physical problems. Typically, people with depression find...
    2,194 Words | 8 Pages
  • depression - 563 Words
    May 01, 2014 Darlene Gutierrez COM 172. Depression. Overview  Introduction.  Definition.  Types of depression.  Factors and statistics  Diagnosis.  Conclusion.  References. Introduction. There is considerable information that people do not know about depression, and at least at some point in one’s lives have gone through this condition. Many people have experienced some unhappiness or sadness as part of changes that happen in everyday life. Feelings of pain often are transient,...
    563 Words | 6 Pages
  • Abnormal Psychology: Rumination and Depression
     Abnormal Psychology Rumnation and Depression Rumination is defined as the “engagement in contemplation or reflection. It also can be equivocally understood by going over in the mind repeatedly and often casually or slowly.” However, depression on the other hand is “a state of unhappiness and hopelessness that can lead up to a lack of energy, inability to sleep, and, sometimes, suicidal tendencies.” After the dissection of these denotations, individuals can...
    1,952 Words | 6 Pages
  • What is the cause of depression and why is depression rising in the United States? Posted by: Karen Willis Posted to: 1144_BERKC_DED_61_SECNO DED DED61
    Benjamin Adjei Professor Karen Willis Foundation of Critical Writing April 22, 2014 What is the cause of depression and why is depression rising in the United States? Everyone occasionally feels blue or sad. But these feelings are usually short-lived and pass within a couple of days. When you have depression, it interferes with daily life and causes pain for both you and those who care about you. Depression is a common but serious illness. About 9 percent of American adults form of...
    937 Words | 3 Pages
  • Personality Assessment Inventory - 1448 Words
    Personality Assessment Inventory Introduction The Beck Depression Inventory is a testing tool which is used to evaluate the continuation and severity of the symptoms of depression, as recorded in the DSM-IV-TR (American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 2000). The test includes questions which asses the symptoms of serious depression, which may possibly call for hospitalization. The latest revised edition replaces the BDI and the BDI-1A, which...
    1,448 Words | 5 Pages
  • Postpartum Depression - 1856 Words
    Introduction What is Postpartum Depression Having a baby should be one of the happiest and most important events in a woman's life. However, although life with a new baby can be both thrilling and rewarding, it can also be a difficult and quite stressful task. Most women make the transition without great difficulty, yet some women experience considerable complexity that may manifest itself as a postpartum psychiatric disorder (O'hara, Hoffman, Philips, & Wright, 1992). Many physical and...
    1,856 Words | 6 Pages
  • psychoanalytic explanation for mood disorders (depression and bipolar disorder)
    Freud's explanation of depression focuses on the idea of loss - that the root cause of all depression lies in the loss of something loved, whether it is a person or an object. Lowry (1984) added that this loss can be real or imaginary. However, some may question what separates the overwhelming sadness caused by, say, the death of a loved one, and depression? The psychoanalytic approach fails to answer this. In PJ Clayton's study, widows and widowers were studied for a year after the death of...
    620 Words | 2 Pages
  • Case study on Joseph Wesbecker's major depression.
    Case Study: The Case of Joseph Wesbecker University of Phoenix PSY 410 November 14, 2011 Case of Joseph Wesbecker Depression can be a major catalyst for disrupt behavior and unusual patterns of actions which are sometimes difficult to justify. Many are suffering through mild phases of sadness brought up from the loss of a family member, a relationship break up, a job loss, or simply from hereditary components. In fact, more severe conditions can lead to clinical depression that can affect...
    1,124 Words | 4 Pages
  • Mr. Brian Ogwari - 693 Words
    MASENO UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC CHALLENGES FACING HEALTHCARE PROVIDERS AND CAREGIVERS OF PEOPLE WITH MENTAL ILLNESS IN LUANDA DIVISION, EMUHAYA DISTRICT, WESTERN KENYA. A RESEARCH PROPOSAL PRESENTED IN PARTIAL FULFILMENT FOR THE AWARD OF THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF PUBLIC HEALTH. BY...
    693 Words | 4 Pages
  • Symptoms of Depression - 973 Words
    Depression is not only a state of being sad, it is a disease that conquers the ability to feel emotion, whether good or bad, whatsoever. Depression not only involves the mind, it also involves the body and thoughts. Depression is not a disease that only influences males or children of the age three to eleven. Every human being is prone to depression. Although women are three times more likely to become depressed than men, men are five times more likely to commit suicide when depressed than...
    973 Words | 4 Pages
  • Depression - 1390 Words
    Depression The normal ups and downs of life and the feeling of sad and “the blues” from time to time might mean you may have a mood disorder. And if you have that feeling of emptiness and despair that has taken hold of your life and will not let go that could be a sign of depression. Depression makes it tough to function and enjoy life like you once did. And getting through the day can be very overwhelming. But not matter how hopelessness you feel you will get better. Understanding the signs...
    1,390 Words | 4 Pages
  • Mental Health & The Workplace
     Abstract This paper analyzes the relationship between depression, anxiety disorders, and bipolar disorder on work related behaviors. The following studies; Harvard Mental Health Newsletter (2010), Lerner et al. (2010), Ludman et al. (2008), Erickson et. al (2008), and Marciniak et al. (2004) have found that there is a significant effect on work-related behaviors in the work force primarily involving absenteeism for depression and bipolar disorder and presenteeism for anxiety...
    3,443 Words | 10 Pages
  • Apply Dsm-Iv to William Styron
    Human Behavior in the Social Environment III Client: William Styron Axis I 296. 25 Major Depressive Disorder, Single Episode, In Partial Remission Axis II 799.9 Deferred Axis III Deferred Axis IV Recent awarding ceremony Problems related to the social environment: Death of friends Problems with primary...
    1,557 Words | 5 Pages
  • Endocarditis - 2025 Words
     Understanding postpartum psychosis: Andrea Yates story Abstract Postpartum depression is a serious mood disorder experienced by women after giving birth. An extreme case of PPD is postpartum psychosis. This complex disorder can shatter mothers mind, body, spirit and end their dreams of what they expected motherhood to be. The mother began to become detached from reality. She began to hear voices telling her to do harm to protect her children. Health professionals estimate...
    2,025 Words | 5 Pages
  • The Truth Behind Pre-Menstrual Dysphoric Disorder (Pmdd)
    Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder (PMDD) is listed as a depressive disorder in the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV). It's no surprise that the 1994 addition of PMDD in the DSM-IV was one of the most controversial contributions in DSM history. Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder indicates serious premenstrual distress with associated deterioration in functioning, causing women to experience severe depression,...
    1,543 Words | 6 Pages
  • Substance Abuse - 1429 Words
    Impact of Psychiatric Disorders on Treatment Outcomes for Patients with Substance Abuse Daniel Painter Raritan Valley Community College Table of Contents Introduction………………………………………………………………………..page 3 Abstract 1………………………………………………………………………….page 4-5 Critique 1………………………………………………………………………….page 5 Abstract 2…………………………………………………………………………page 6 Critique 2………………………………………………………………………….page 6-7 Abstract 3…………………………………………………………………………page 8 Critique...
    1,429 Words | 5 Pages
  • Adolescent Depression Essay 3
    Adolescent Depression Depression is something that I really have had no experience with in my life. Personally, I might have thought about killing myself figuratively at one specific point in my life. I thought about what the consequences would be and how it would effect the people who surround me in my life. As soon as these thoughts raced through my mind, I quickly realized that suicide is the wrong way to deal with life. I know that depression plays an essential role when dealing with...
    1,536 Words | 5 Pages
  • Is Cyclothymia a Disorder - 1565 Words
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