Cowboy Essays & Research Papers

Best Cowboy Essays

  • The Cowboy - 1155 Words
    Thomas Jacob Ainsworth Thomas was easily identifiable in our school. He was the only real cowboy. Some other boys wore the boots and hats of the Western heroes, but Thomas was the only one who had the heart to pull the look off. He never actually wore a cowboy hat to school, he said that was for work, but he could always be seen wearing his boots. They were well worn and could not be mistaken for the boots worn by other boys, which always appeared as if fresh out of the box. Thomas wore his...
    1,155 Words | 3 Pages
  • Cowboys and Cattlemen - 3213 Words
    The Representation and Separation Between Two Classes of People: Managers and Workers Adam Diaz Matt Luckettt GEM24CW- 5 The United States as a nation is ever changing. The U.S. population is growing every year, and the different types of ethnicities continue to flood into the country searching for the “American Dream.” However, how many people actually see this dream become a reality? The answer to that...
    3,213 Words | 9 Pages
  • The American Cowboy - 2802 Words
    The American Cowboy The cowboys of the frontier have long captured the imagination of the American public. Americans, faced with the reality of an increasingly industrialized society, love the image of a man living out in the wilderness fending for himself against the dangers of the unknown. By the year 1900 there were few renegade Indians left in the country and the vast expanse of open land to the west of the Mississippi was rapidly filling with settlers. Cowboys represented a major part of...
    2,802 Words | 7 Pages
  • The Life of a Cowboy - 416 Words
    The Life of a Cowboy My grandfather’s life as a cowboy was very interesting. Most of what I know about my grandfather was told to me long after his days as a cowboy. As a young boy, at the age of five years old, this was very fascinating to me. He lived his life as a rowdy, kindhearted cowboy who was an excellent story teller. First of all, my grandfather loved to be the center of attention. He loved making people laugh. At times, he would get carried away and the wild, rowdy, cowboy side...
    416 Words | 2 Pages
  • All Cowboy Essays

  • Knights and Cowboys - 391 Words
    Knights and Cowboys Knights versus cowboys. Between these two, many people would rather have a knight in shining armor than a cowboy in chaps. But when you get down to the core of it, cowboys are pretty much nothing but knights wearing different clothing. Don’t get me wrong, there are some big differences between the two, but in my opinion they’re almost the same. Both cowboys and knights were ready for action. They always seemed to follow their leader. Although they weren’t able to show...
    391 Words | 2 Pages
  • APUSH Cowboys - 593 Words
    To begin with, a cowboy is a man who believes in God, country, family, and horse, which are all core American values. He is also a sharp shooter, who will answer your question the way he feels you should hear it rather than observe politically correctness. He'll call things the way he sees them rather than exaggerate, because he knows deep inside what is true and what is not true which makes him incredibly honest. He is still extremely chivalrous, and deeply respects our legal system, police...
    593 Words | 2 Pages
  • Starspangled Cowboy - 1942 Words
    ASSIGNMENT 1 205L: Close Reading, Good Writing By Aly Verbaan Student # 31201792 Backdrop addresses cowboy By MARGARET ATWOOD Starspangled cowboy sauntering out of the almost- silly West, on your face a porcelain grin, tugging a papier-mâché cactus on wheels behind you with a string, you are innocent as a bathtub full of bullets. Your righteous eyes, your laconic trigger-fingers people the streets with villains: as you move, the air in front of you blossoms with...
    1,942 Words | 7 Pages
  • History of Cowboys - 274 Words
    History of Cowboys Back in the day, ranchers would hire cowboys to look over their herds. Today, cowboys show their skills by bull riding, using a lasso, and roping and tying steers. The Mexican-American War in the 1850’s is when the traditional cowboy look was actually developed. American soldiers improved this look during the war and brought it to the South. By improving the look, they made the hats cooler and the outfits more durable opposed to just be colorful. There are numerous types...
    274 Words | 1 Page
  • The Days the Cowboys Quit - 1704 Words
    Elmer Kelton The Day the Cowboys Quit Texas Christian University Press, Forth Worth The Day the Cowboys Quit written by Elmer Kelton is an old western novel based on the events of the strike that took place at old Tascosa in the Texas Panhandle in 1883. It portraits in a very unique and interesting way the social, political, and economical changes that were taking place in the years before and after the Civil War in Texas; how the cowboys who for long had being men that in a way...
    1,704 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Day the Cowboys Quit - 1274 Words
    The Day The Cowboys Quit The Day the Cowboys Quit is a novel written by the highly acclaimed Texas native, Elmer Kelton, in 1971. Kelton was born April 29th, 1926 in West Texas. Throughout the early years of his life, Kelton was raised on a ranch and attended college at the University of Texas to study journalism. Over a span of about fifty years, Kenton was hard at work delivering western novels, most of which are based in Texas. The novel The Day the Cowboys Quit received the Spur award in...
    1,274 Words | 4 Pages
  • Cowboy and Railroad Industry - 1371 Words
    Grade 04 Social Studies Unit 09: The Cattle Industry and Railroads in Texas | | | Lesson SynopsisStudents will explain the growth, development, and impact of the cattle industry and railroads onTexas History. Students will gather information about individuals and events and then use this information to analyze cowboy poetry. TEKS 4.4 | History.. The student understands the political, economic, and social changes in Texas during the last half of the 19th century. The student is expected...
    1,371 Words | 4 Pages
  • Cowboy Subculture Paper - 1634 Words
    Subculture Cowboy Culture The word cowboy brings to mind images of the old west, mostly movies. Ten gallon hats, boots, spurs, horses, revolvers and of course cows. In todays society the term cowboy or cowgirl isn’t always a favorable one. It can mean ignorant, country, reckless, or just refer to boots and hats. Are Cowboys even still around? Not the “wanna be” hat on the weekend’s type of person, the genuine article. The answer may surprise you. In today’s modern world, cowboys aren’t just...
    1,634 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Day the Cowboys Quit - 623 Words
    It's the rare western book that invites a Marxian analysis, but Elmer Kelton, who died recently, was the rare western writer. "The Day the Cowboys Quit"takes place at the intersection of rugged American individualism and the collective efforts of the undercapitalized to improve their lot. The book renders a cowboys' strike - a fascinating concept - that actually happened, on ranches in the Canadian River region of west Texas circa 1883. By Kelton's lights, the strike occurred in the...
    623 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Influence of Western Cowboys in America
    THE INFLUENCE OF WESTERN COWBOYS IN AMERICA Have you ever seen a typical American Western Movie? If so, I think it’s not difficult to form an image of western cowboys in your mind. Then what do they look like? A boy, wearing felt hat and riding boots with dagger and handgun on the waist, press his two legs powerful which makes the horse speed away. In a word, west cowboys are the heroes on horsebacks. Because of the lifestyle and behaviors of them, western cowboys have become a sign of...
    752 Words | 2 Pages
  • Cowboys: Myth V. Reality
    The American Cowboy Discuss the American cowboy in terms of myth vs. reality. How and why did this less than glamorous historical figure become transformed into our romantic “All-American” national hero? The traditional cowboy depicted in media is noble, heroic, determined, and humble – all qualities that many individuals would like to possess themselves. So it is no wonder that America has adopted this image of the rugged do-gooder as its national symbol. Through these expectations the image...
    642 Words | 2 Pages
  • Cowboy myth and reality - 611 Words
    Cowboy Myth and Reality The myth of the American cowboys has remained prevalent over the years. Today they are still idolized in the American film industry and characterized as heroes by millions of people. The truth, nonetheless, is that most people only know the myth. The reality and the myth of the cowboy greatly differ. The origin of the cowboy myth can be traced to England. S.W. Scott, who was an Englishmen, that wrote about knights in shining armor. This was between 1810 and...
    611 Words | 2 Pages
  • Cowboys And Indians Compare Contrast
    COWBOYS AND INDIANS: COMPARE/CONTRAST 1 Cowboys and Indians: Compare/Contrast Hayley Leinstock Endeavor Charter School COWBOYS AND INDIANS: COMPARE/CONTRAST 2 The Wild West, otherwise known as the Old West, was a unique period in American history. Pop culture has turned much of the true West into legend. Nowadays, many people perceive the Wild West as told through movies and television shows, but most of what ...
    1,311 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Day the Cowboys Quit - 533 Words
    Although Hugh Hitchcock did not support the Strike of 1883 from the beginning, he somehow got involved and ended up being portrayed as a traitor. After the strike, Hitch faced many challenges that affected him mentally, emotionally and physically. His relationships with former friends such as Charlie Waide were jeopardized and never seemed to be the same. Hitch also did all he could to not let the big ranches take his Two Diamonds brand and not let them break him as a man. After the strike...
    533 Words | 2 Pages
  • The True American Cowboy - 2100 Words
    The True American Cowboy As the twentieth century approached, America was experiencing a time of considerable expansion. All eyes were looking for ways to make the United States a larger, more powerful, and more efficient country. Because of this wave in American society, there was no movement given more devotion than the settling of the West. The range-cattle industry in its various aspects, and in its importance to the United States and particularly to the Great Plains, has been a...
    2,100 Words | 6 Pages
  • The American Cowboy: Myth vs. Reality
    Historian Frederick Jackson Turner's famous essay "The Significance of the Frontier in American History" defines the "frontier" as a place of westward expansion with new opportunities, heroism, triumph and progress mainly by brave white men. While he writes that the "closing of the frontier" occurred with the extinction of the Western frontier and cowboy's character, Americans have found a way to glamorize the image of the cowboy in the west during the 1800's. It is important to emphasize the...
    1,304 Words | 4 Pages
  • Native Americans in the United States and African American Cowboys
    Tenzin Dolkar APUSH, DAY-2-2 TO WHOM AND TO WHAT EXTENT WAS THE AMERICAN WEST A LAND OF OPPORTUNITY 1865 - 1890 During the year of 1865 to 1890, the American’s west land was a land of economic development for Native American, white settlers from the east across the Mississippi farmers, miners, ranchers and as well as African American cowboys and immigrants for Irish and Chines, moving...
    383 Words | 1 Page
  • Characterize the Daily Life of a Woman in the West, as It Talks About Cowboys, Lawmen, Outlaws, and Other Interesting Facts About the West- Where Are the Black Folks?? or, for That Matter Where Is the Vaquero the Essenti
    Unit Three Chapter 18 Writing Assignment During the late 1800’s to early 1900’s women in the west were valued in their work in the home, on the streets and some women during this time played the same roles as men being Cowgirls. However, women mainly held their responsibilities in the home. Women played the role of a wife, a mother, a seamstress and often nurses. Their domestic duties including raising their children, farm work, gathering food and milk along with utilizing their sewing skills....
    644 Words | 2 Pages
  • All the Pretty Horses Versus the Searchers
    "The Searchers" versus All the Pretty Horses The American west is one of our most revered eras, romanticized by numerous forms of media in the United States. Mediums of movies, books and television shows glorify the fiction of the old west. John Ford's film "The Searchers" is an ideal example of this romanticized American West. Typically, an American Western story confines the women to home duties, having no original ideas or thoughts of their own, while the status of the hero is elevated...
    944 Words | 3 Pages
  • All the Pretty Horses Essay
    The Guardian – The Myth of the Cowboy, Eric Hobsbawm In the article The Myth of the Cowboy, Eric Hobsbawm argues that the tradition of the American cowboy has become an invented myth. All the Pretty Horses, by Cormac McCarthy explores the journey of John Grady Cole and Lacey Rawlins, who leave Texas and travel to Mexico where they acquire the cowboy lifestyle. The text could fit into the same category Hobsbawm describes but it also serves as a more realistic and honest description of the...
    396 Words | 2 Pages
  • Ranch Girl - 1076 Words
    Tamarah Phillips SOS: Creative Writing Reader Response # 3 Ranch Girl by Maile Meloy from Contemporary American Short Fiction The story is told in second person, which gives the reader a sense of being in the story, at the same time being an observer. It begins with telling you where you stand in the socio-economics’ and in the eyes of your peers. “If you’re white, and you’re not rich or poor but somewhere in the middle, it’s hard to have worse luck than be born a girl on the...
    1,076 Words | 3 Pages
  • “ the Coming of the Railroads Was the Main Reason for the Growth of the Cattle Industry on the Plains in the Years 1865-85”
    History “ The coming of the railroads was the main reason for the growth of the cattle industry on the Plains in the years 1865-85” The rail roads certainly did play a very important part in the growth of the cattle industry. It meant that it was a lot more convenient and less time consuming to transport cattle (obviously a very important part of the whole cattle trading business). It also provided more people with the opportunity to buy ‘base land’ (name given to land used as a ‘base to...
    1,022 Words | 3 Pages
  • American west - Cattle industry revision
    Cattle industry 1820-1865: Origins in Texas Ranching first started in Texas, with ranches mostly manned by Mexican cowboys called vaqueros. In 1836 Texan ranchers drove many Mexicans out, and claimed the cattle left behind. The Civil War started in 1861, and Texans went off to fight. The cattle roamed free as huge herds grew up. On returning home, the Texans started rounding them up and driving them to sell in places such as New Orleans and California. 1865-1870: The 'long drives' - first...
    477 Words | 2 Pages
  • Poetry Buffalo Bill’s Defunct
    Genre Buffalo Bill’s Defunct is a short poem; it tells a story and creates a picture of a hardworking cowboy named Bill. The poem is about a dead, handsome blue eyed cowboy. It is written in the narrative form and in the first person. The author personifies death and he is upset with death for taking away Bill the cowboy: “… and what i want to know is how do you like your blueeyed boy Mister Death.” (Clugston, 2010) Theme The theme is about death; however the author did not take...
    667 Words | 2 Pages
  • mice and men - 490 Words
    Moreover, Steinbeck uses a descriptive form of language to show that the ranch workers have an unpleasant, narrow future. he demonstrates this when he says ''the bunkhouse was a long, rectangular building'' this gives the reader the impression of the bunkhouse being long and thin in shape, almost like a corridor, representing the men’s narrow pathways in life. This also shows that the ranch workers are restricted from fulfilling their dreams because they have an unpleasant future, as they...
    490 Words | 2 Pages
  • Shane the Western Hero - 1250 Words
    Shane the Western Hero A Western is a major defining genre from the American film industry on the border of civilization and the wilderness. Western is one of the oldest most flexible genre/hero types in the world. If you are looking for characteristics of a western hero Shane is the character to go to.. Shane is bound by legal codes of behavior, ethics, justice, honor and chivalry (or the code by which knights were supposed to live by). He is a passive, mysterious man who says little about...
    1,250 Words | 3 Pages
  • Tourism Planning at El Kabayo
    Holy Angel University Angeles City, Philippines Tourism Development Plan for El Kabayo Riding Stables and Cowboy Western Town Clark Special Economic Zone, Philippines In partial fulfilment of the requirements in the course subject Tourism Planning and Development (HTPLAN) Salvador, Anna Rose R. I. Introduction: Clark El Kabayo Riding Stables and Cowboy Western Town also known as Clark Riding Stables Inc. is located at Bldg. 4350 & 4351, Gil Puyat Avenue...
    1,600 Words | 9 Pages
  • Silverado: Fulfilling Conventions of a Western
    Silverado: Fulfilling Conventions of a Western The Western genre has left an indelible mark on the world and thanks to Hollywood, the ingredients to a traditional Western are hard to miss. Lawrence Kasdan’s Silverado contains classic western elements and visualizes the Manifest Destiny mythology of a primitive way of life confronted with modern technology and social changes by fulfilling traditional conventions, iconography, and expectations of a standard western. In order to understand...
    1,633 Words | 5 Pages
  • Billy the Kid - 1021 Words
    Billy the Kid is my kind of Cowboy This issue of Living in the West explores the love affair we have with the great American Cowboy. Call them cowhands, cowpoke, cowpuncher or buckaroos, billions of dollars have been spent chronicling their storied history. With his Stetson hat, sunburned face, weathered dungarees and boots of leather, the cowboy has gone from a ranch hand to a blue color icon. In fact, America’s love affair with the cowboy has been around longer than the name “cowboy”...
    1,021 Words | 3 Pages
  • Pecos Bill - 1187 Words
    Texas, Home of The King Cowboy Pecos Bill, according to Peter Poulakis, was the patron saint of all things cowboy. As a baby, Bill was weaned on moonshine, and teethed on a bowie knife. His legend began when he was about year old, when Bill’s father decided to move the family out west. Bill’s father felt that his farmland had become too crowed for comfort when a family moved within fifty miles of his farm. During the move Bill’s family crossed the Pecos River in their wagon. While crossing the...
    1,187 Words | 3 Pages
  • country, rock - 531 Words
    Country and Rock Country vs. Rock There are many genres in today’s music for one to choose. Many of them are not so different, for example, Country and Bluegrass. Then again, some genres are completely different like Metal and Polka. There are many complex conversations and arguments over which genre is closest and farthest apart. In my opinion the hardest compare and contrast of them all would be between Country and Rock. Firstly, some may wonder why Country and Rock sound so similar. Both...
    531 Words | 2 Pages
  • hometown - 803 Words
    Renan Aranda Engl 1302: Comp II Topic: Hometown Fun Growing up in Hobbs, New Mexico I never really took into consideration what would be “unique” or “attractive” for a visitor. Hobbs is a relatively small town compared to Midland or Odessa, Texas. Being so close to the Permian Basin, the oil business has had the same effect to Hobbs as it has in West Texas. Every small town has its own uniqueness, whether if it is a deliciously decadent restaurant, marvelous park, or a captivating museum....
    803 Words | 3 Pages
  • Analyse Shane with Specific Reference to the Films Visual Style and Western Themes
    ‘ Analyse Shane with specific reference to the films visual style and western themes.' By analysing ‘Shane' (1953) in conjunction with its visual style and western themes, it will clearly show what aspects of western culture are apparent in the film. By looking at the visual style, this will show how the mise-en-scene informs the audience that ‘Shane' is placed in the western genre. Firstly I will analyse the western themes that are visible in ‘Shane'. The whole narrative of ‘Shane' is...
    1,584 Words | 5 Pages
  • Border Patrol - 768 Words
    Border Patrol Reform “Smugglers today are more determined and potentially more violent and destructive than ever. They’ll do almost anything to protect their contraband, avoid being apprehended, and maintain ‘control’ of their trails out of, and back into, Mexico. They’re outwardly hostile toward all U.S. law enforcement and authority, as well as rival ‘gangs’ vying for the routes and contracts with cartels, and anyone else that might ‘get in their way.’ Those of us that live and work in...
    768 Words | 2 Pages
  • 1982 Dbq - 1119 Words
    During the 1840s to the 1890s, the United States was focused on westward development and to fulfill the American belief of “Manifest Destiny”. Even though the west has a lot of grassy plains and desert (Doc. A), the western part of the United States quickly became the main target of expansionist movements/campaigns of the United States during the 18th century. Even though many factors contributed in shaping the development of the West beyond the Mississippi and the lives of those who lived and...
    1,119 Words | 4 Pages
  • the Myth and Reality of the American West
    AP American History The Myth and Reality of the American West We have all heard the stories about the old west. There are the infamous gunfights, the cowboys that steal all of the women’s hearts, and the many stagecoach robberies. But how can we tell fact from fiction? Where is the line drawn between the reality of the American west and the myth portrayed in the numerous books and movies? Everything may not have been as adventurous as we believe, or as glamorous. But the real question...
    766 Words | 2 Pages
  • Geographical Location - 284 Words
     The Texas Hill County My important Geographical location is the hill country, specifically the area between Wimberley and Fredericksburg, Texas. This area is full of different types of trees and wildlife. There are different lakes and a river that runs through it as well as ranches, farms, caves, and small family owned businesses such as the Luckenbach feed store and Alamo Springs Café. This location is important to me because I grew up here. I loved being able to run around in the trees...
    284 Words | 1 Page
  • Settlement West - 613 Words
    Running head: SETTLEMENT WEST 1 Settling West Richard Sheppard Grantham University SETTLEMENT WEST 2 Settlement West There were many dangers associated with living in the 1800’s, more so when you were a settler attempting to live the dream of migrating west. You had to avoid disease, animal attacks, Native Americans attacking you while you cross their territories, or you could be injured in your day to day activities moving west, with no...
    613 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Cattle Kingdom - 789 Words
    1-The Cattle Kingdom Cattle ranching was important in the West’s changing economy. The open range provided a place where herds could graze free of charge with no boundaries. Mexican ranchers were the ones who developed the techniques and equipment that was later used by all ranchers and cowboys, including branding, roping saddles, chaps, spurs and roundups. Texas had the largest herds of cattle and their cattle came from good Spanish stock, as well as small muscular broncos or mustangs suited...
    789 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Civil War Era - 2226 Words
    Cattle Herding – A Brief HistoryArticle Selections: The Origin of Cattle Driving & Beef Trade – Pre/Post Civil War | Origin of Cattle Driving Figure [ 1 ] Drovers about to start a drive As early as 1836, ranchers in Texas began to drive cattle along a "Beef Trail" to New Orleans. In the 1840s, cattle drives expanded northward into Missouri. The towns of Sedalia, Baxter Springs, Springfield, and St. Louis became principal markets. The Shawnee Trail, also known as the Texas Road...
    2,226 Words | 6 Pages
  • Wild West - 420 Words
    5.07A Wild West Brainstorming: When I hear the word “cowboy” I think of.. 1. a tall slender man 2. boots 3. wrangler jeans 4. rural and southern accents 5. hats 6. fishing 7. respectful 8. flannel 9. guns 10. mudding 11. hunting 12. has manners, ex. Yes ma’am, Yes sir. 13. whiskey 14. leather 15. cows 16. poker 17. tobacco Outlaw: Black Bart Known as the master outlaw of his time. He had become the master at stealing from stagecoaches. He...
    420 Words | 2 Pages
  • All the Pretty Horses Essay 1
    Wild, Wild West? Not So Wild. All the Pretty Horses by Cormac McCarthy is the American work of art to many people. Throughout the whole novel there is a sense of a balanced concept of violence and romance. The main theme of it all is conflict: man vs. woman, rich vs. poor, and freedom vs. authority. Within the whole novel there is the notion of the cowboy, John Grady, “rediscovering” the West and the cowboy lifestyle. During this era, Westward expansion correlates with of cowboys came back....
    929 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Day The Cow Boys Quit
    The Day The Cowboys Quit This story was about the cowboy strike happened in Texas Panhandle in 1833. The main character was Hugh Hitchcock. He worked as a wagon boss for rancher Charlie Waide. Rascal Mcginty and Law Mcginty were also worked for Charlie Waide. The story started as that Rascal McGinty were argue with Dayton Brumley about the cow¡¦s brand as either LR or Figure 4. Hitchcock can not judge for them. At night Brumley¡¦s boss Selkirk come to talk about the Figure 4 and tell Charlie...
    836 Words | 2 Pages
  • much ado about nothing
    Eva Cunningham Both Shakespeare in ‘Much Ado about Nothing’ and Duffy with ‘Quickdraw’ explore difficult relationships. The writers do this in different ways, and although the two texts, one a play and the other a poem were written over 400 years apart there are several comparisons that can be made between them Central to ‘Much Ado about Nothing’ is the relationship between Beatrice and Benedick. At first, they seem to hate each other and they take every opportunity to insult each other both...
    527 Words | 2 Pages
  • Museum Essay - 737 Words
    Teresa Heflin Literature of the American West 22 April 2013 Examining a Work of Art The Rattlesnake is Frederic Hemington’s newest bronze work. This piece is located in the Sid Richardson Museum in Fort Worth, Texas. Hemington created this bronze work in 1904 to tell the dramatic story of the American West. The Rattlesnake is Frederic Hemington’s 12th and final bronze piece, however many consider it one of his best. Hemington created this piece later in his life; it shows the fierce motion...
    737 Words | 2 Pages
  • Transformations of the American West - 1138 Words
    Brittany Exam 3 Essay 9 Dec 2012 Transformations of the American West The three most important transformations of the American West were the completion of the railway system, economically, the diversity of the people, socially, and the conservation of land, politically. All of these transformations have made an unmistakable impact of the American West and what it is today. The largest economic transformation in American Western history was the building of the railroad systems. It was...
    1,138 Words | 3 Pages
  • Week 4 Swot 1
     Harold Green SWOT Analysis The business plan I will be analyzing was created by the owners of Mahogany Western Wear, a retail clothing store located in Houston, Texas which will cater to the African-American cowboy community. The business plan was highly-detailed, and did a great job of explaining the purpose of starting a new business venture. “It explained the new company’s business model describing what kinds of product it will make and sell and why they will appeal...
    731 Words | 3 Pages
  • Historical Fiction Book Report
    Bala Lwin December 12, 2015 American Diaries: Ellen Elizabeth Hawkins By: Kathleen Duey “American Diaries: Ellen Elizabeth Hawkins” is the real story of a young girl living and working at a ranch with her grandfather at father during a drought. Though her father and grandfather don’t think it is a proper life for a girl, Ellen Elizabeth Hawkins desires being a cattle rancher. But due...
    771 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Chisholm Trail - 490 Words
    The Chisholm Trail The Chisholm Trail was a trail used in 1800’s to drive Longhorn cattle to Kansas railroads. The trail started in San Antonio, Texas and went to Abilene, Kansas, where the cattle were sold and shipped eastward. The Chisholm Trail was named after Jesse Chisholm. Jesse Chisholm was a skilled trader, guide and an interpreter that spoke English and fourteen different Indian languages. In 1865, Jesse Chisholm hauled wagons loaded with buffalo hides from his trading post...
    490 Words | 2 Pages
  • Critical Review of a painting at the Jaycee Park Center for the Arts
     Critical Review of a painting at the Jaycee Park Center for the Arts While visiting the Jaycee Park Centre for the Arts, this picture of cowboys rounding up cows on a ranch instantly caught my eye. The picture is a standard size of 3x3, and is square shaped. It is enclosed within a golden frame, which makes it more conspicuous. I was drawn to the picture by the cowboy who is wearing the red scarf, and sky blue shirt. The artist James Spurlock, has used him to capture the observer’s...
    589 Words | 2 Pages
  • Malboro Man - 1246 Words
    Assignment 1, The Marlboro Man The Marlboro Man was one of the most successful advertisement campaigns of its time. This assignment will look at the forces behind the image of the Marlboro Man and how the images of a cowboy or stockman has influenced an audience into buying cigarettes that eventually lead to many deaths. (Brannstrom, I & Lindlad, IB (1994). The style of a mature aged cowboy remained on billboards and in newspapers around the world until the end of the twentieth century....
    1,246 Words | 3 Pages
  • Two Head Better Than One
    Duy Nguyen Professor Matthews English 905, 9:20 AM March 26th, 2013 Cattle Drive Cowboys are a legendary in western. The image of cowboys has appeared in many films and books, and the image was always associated with Cattle Dive which is a traditional activity of cowboys. Cattle Drive was an important activity in Western since its profit is an important source of Western people. In this essay, I will define the Cattle Drive, and its history and movement also. Cattle drive is a process of...
    548 Words | 2 Pages
  • frontier myth - 382 Words
    In the United States, the frontier was the term applied to the zone of unsettled land outside the region of existing settlements of Americans. In a broad sense, the notion of the frontier was the edge of the settled country where unlimited free land was available and thus unlimited opportunity. Being a frontiersman in the so-called Wild West, a cowboy, rancher or gold miner were idealized within American mystery. Mark Twain colorfully related that accounts of gold strikes in the popular press...
    382 Words | 1 Page
  • Describing an Outdoor Concert - 479 Words
    DESCRIBING: AN OUTDOOR CONCERT At first parking seemed to be extremely overpriced; thirty dollars to park in a parking lot full of trucks with grills and coolers full of beer in their beds. The music from the speakers that were about a mile or two down the road traveled into my car as if it were a ghost and took over my CD player. Suddenly the rap music that was being played was taken over by Big and Rich, one of country music's superstars. The blazing sun felt like an oven compared to...
    479 Words | 2 Pages
  • All The Pretty Horses Settings
    All The Pretty Horses By Cormac McCarthy Often in literature, authors use the novel's setting to add certain significance to the story's plot. Cormac McCarthy does this in his novel All The Pretty Horses. There is great significance in the setting because the story takes place in two contrasting locations, Texas and Mexico, rather than one central location. The novel opens up in Texas, in 1950. The opening scene is at John Grady Cole's grandfather's funeral. After the funeral, his mother plans...
    584 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Sea of Grass - 317 Words
    Bankowski 1 David Bankowski Mrs. Downes Humanities 4A 7 January 2002 The Sea of Grass In this novel by Conrad Richter, the end of the New Mexico frontier as seen through the eyes of Hal, the nephew of one of the last great cattle ranchers. As civilization encroaches even onto that remote region, Colonel Jim Brewton symbolizes the last struggle and eventual submission of the land to the inevitable development of the forces of society. Jim was lord of his...
    317 Words | 2 Pages
  • Of Mice and Men Tragedy - 631 Words
    The death of Lennie at the end of ¡®Of Mice and Men¡¯ seems, at first, to be the most tragic event in the novel, especially for the people directly concerned, such as George and Lennie himself. However, in actual fact, the novel is full of sad people suffering in a world where no one really cares about them. The men who worked on the ranches, the itinerant workers were sad and lonely people. As George says ¡°Guys like us, who work on ranches, were the most lonely people in this world.¡± They...
    631 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Long Drive: Will You Re-Up Next Year? Dbq
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  • Of Mice And Men - 847 Words
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