Cosmological argument Essays & Research Papers

Best Cosmological argument Essays

  • Cosmological Argument - 559 Words
    What is the "Cosmological Argument" for God's existence? Be sure to make the premises and conclusion clear. Discuss what you take to be the strongest objection to this argument, and explain why you think it succeeds or fails. The cosmological argument for God’s existence differs from both the scriptural and ontological arguments in the way in which humans created it. Rather than looking at logical arguments or religious texts, the cosmological argument was derived because of humanity’s...
    559 Words | 2 Pages
  • Cosmological Argument - 1492 Words
    The Cosmological Argument as proof of God The Cosmological Argument is born out of premise that the world must have a cause and a reason for existing. The word ‘cosmos’ comes the Greek word meaning concerned with cause. The argument is posteriori in its nature, meaning it is based on thing we experience in the universe, and takes a probabilistic approach to try and decipher how said evidence came to being. In this essay I will focus on arguments from Aquinas, Leibniz and Frederick Copleston,...
    1,492 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Cosmological Argument - 350 Words
    The arguments presented from William Rowe in The Cosmological Argument conclude that although the Cosmological Argument might be a sound argument, it does not provide good rational grounds for believing that among those beings that exist there is one whose existence is accounted for by its own nature. Rowe reasons that it does not attempt to prove anything about the first cause or about God, except to argue that such a cause must exist. Defenders of the argument reply that the Principles of...
    350 Words | 1 Page
  • Cosmological argument - 1495 Words
    Explain the strengths and weaknesses of Aquinas’ Cosmological argument The Cosmological argument attempts to explain that something has caused the universe to exist and this First cause is what we call God. The argument begins with observations that try to support the following statements: • Everything in the universe has a cause • The universe itself must have a cause • To avoid infinite regress of causes there must be an uncaused cause • This uncaused cause is God The argument uses...
    1,495 Words | 4 Pages
  • All Cosmological argument Essays

  • Cosmological Argument - 1827 Words
    a) Examine the central ideas and strengths of the cosmological argument for the existence of God. The cosmological argument is an inductive and a posteriori argument for the existence of God. Cosmos is the Greek word that refers to everything that exists, the universe itself and everything in it. The argument intends on proving the existence of God on the basis that nothing can come from nothing. It argues that because things exist there must be a God that brings them into existence and...
    1,827 Words | 5 Pages
  • Cosmological Argument - 498 Words
    The Cosmological Argument The cosmological argument is the argument that the existence of the world or universe is strong evidence for the existence of a God who created it. The existence of the universe, the argument claims, stands in need of explanation, and the only adequate explanation of its existence is that it was created by God. Like most arguments for the existence of God, the cosmological argument exists in several forms; two are discussed here: the temporal, kalam cosmological...
    498 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Kalam Cosmological Argument - 474 Words
    The Kalam cosmological argument points to the creation of the universe as proof of the divine. To do so it involves proving that the universe did indeed have a beginning, and has not existed for an infinite amount of time. It also argues that all things including the universe itself, with the exception of God, are caused. Furthermore this cause was personal. The first argument presented is that an actual infinite is a logical impossibility. Allowance is made for potential infinites (i.e. the...
    474 Words | 2 Pages
  • Key Features of the Cosmological Argument
    Examine the key ideas of the cosmological argument. The cosmological argument seeks to prove the existence of God on the basis that the universe has not always been in existence and so for it to be created, an external cause was necessary; this outside agent is viewed as God. It creates à posteriori knowledge which provides inductive explanations and makes conclusions on ideas based on actual experiences. It is a non-propositional argument so it cannot be proven but can be argued by...
    552 Words | 2 Pages
  • Clarke's Cosmological Argument - 1028 Words
    Clarke begins his argument by asserting the obvious--that based on experience, all of the beings that surround us today do exist. These beings, encountered based on one’s experience, are dependent on a prior cause. In other words, everything that exists must have been caused by something else that also exists or has existed; and for something finite to exist today, such as any being in this world, it would mean that there must have been something that has existed since infinity. According to...
    1,028 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Cosmological Argument for the Existence of God
    The cosmological argument for the existence of god According to St. John 8:31-32 said, “If you remain in my word, you will truly be my disciples, and you will know the truth and the truth shall set you free”. This sentence is come from the bible, but I am not a christian, so I do not really understand what this means. I guess it was talking about if people believe in god, and trust his words, and in the end the will get the freedom. For many of christians, they believes in god, but many...
    1,416 Words | 4 Pages
  • Assess the Cosmological Argument - 1355 Words
    ‘Why is there something rather than nothing?’ Assess whether the existence of the universe requires God as a first cause? The concept that there cannot be nothing and so must be something is due to the evidence we as human beings have experienced throughout our lives; every effect ever made has had a cause. Aquinas used the laws of Motion and Design to demonstrate how every action must have a correlating reaction, and related this to his argument for God being the first cause – the uncaused...
    1,355 Words | 4 Pages
  • Cosmological Argument - part a - 561 Words
    A) Outline the key features of the cosmological argument The cosmological argument tries to answer the question “why is there a universe rather than nothing at all?” As the argument draws on experience and observation it is synthetic posterior and inductive. With the use of inductive reasoning, it proposes the need for an eternal and necessary cause. Drawing from Plato’s observation that the universe has to be dependent on a primary mover, which was further developed by Plato’s greatest...
    561 Words | 2 Pages
  • Outline Aquinas Cosmological Argument
    Outline Aquinas' cosmological argument (30) St. Thomas Aquinas (1224-1274) was a Dominican priest, theologian, and philosopher. In one of his most famous works, the Summa, Theologiae, Aquinas put forward five proofs for the existence of God. Three of his ways, which will be discussed in this essay start with the observation of motion, efficient causation and contingency. The other two are the argument for Degrees and Perfection and The Argument from Intelligent Design. This is a posterior...
    930 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Modal Cosmological Argument - 1303 Words
    THE REASONABLENESS OF ACCEPTING OR REJECTING THE MODAL COSMOLOGICAL ARGUMENT: In this essay I shall explain why it is reasonable to accept "The Modal Cosmological Argument" as a rational explanation for the existence of God. The modal cosmological argument makes use of "modal" elements such as possibility, necessary existence and contingent existence to prove that a necessary being - namely God - exists. It also applies to the entire cosmos and all possible cosmoi and therefore deemed to...
    1,303 Words | 4 Pages
  • Thomas Aquinas Cosmological Argument
    Paper #1 From the arguments discussed in class, I choose to evaluate Thomas Aquinas’ Cosmological Argument. Aquinas offers a believable case for the existence of God through five arguments. The arguments are “a posteriori arguments” with five strategies (Aquinas 52). The first argues that there is an unmoved mover that originated all motion but the mover, itself, does not move. The second argument concludes: “there must be a first cause to explain the existence of cause” (Aquinas 52). The...
    2,353 Words | 6 Pages
  • Examine the cosmological argument for t
     Examine the cosmological argument for the existence of God? The key idea in cosmological arguments is that the world, the universe, and everything in them are dependent on something other than themselves for their existence. In other words, cosmological arguments attempt to justify God's existence on the assumption that nothing can come from nothing, and that God must exist in order for anything to be here. Although the cosmological argument was expressed by Aquinas it was originally...
    789 Words | 3 Pages
  • Cosmological Argument and Creation Myth
    Judeo-Christian Creation Myth In the Judeo-Christian creation myth, God created light and darkness, the sky, sun, moon and stars, the land and the sea, sky dwellers, sea dwellers, and land dwellers, and on the seventh and final day, God rested from work and nothing was created. The reason that God rested was because even he believes that nobody should be constantly working and if you have earned it, a rest is in order. This is where the idea of a Sabbath day came into the Jewish beliefs,...
    323 Words | 1 Page
  • Success of Aquinas’s Cosmological Argument
    Thomas Aquinas’s cosmological argument is a posteriori argument that Aquinas uses to prove the existence of God. Aquinas argues that, “Nothing can move itself, so whatever is in motion must be put in motion by another, and that by another again. But this causal loop cannot go on to infinity, so if every object in motion had a mover, there must be a first mover which is the unmoved mover, called God.” (Aquinas, Question 2, Article 3). I do agree with Aquinas’s cosmological argument in proving the...
    872 Words | 3 Pages
  • Explain Aquinas' Cosmological Argument
    a) Explain Aquinas Cosmological Argument The Cosmological Argument is a posteriori argument (knowledge gained after experience) which attempts to prove that there is a rational basis for the belief in God. This argument is synthetic as it uses senses and is distinctive as it uses evidence of the universe to prove that God exists. The argument attempts to prove that God exists by evaluating the scale and nature of the cosmos. In order for this argument to succeed it has to be inductive and...
    1,280 Words | 3 Pages
  • Evaluation of the Cosmological Argument - 317 Words
    The Cosmological Argument a. Explain how the cosmological argument tries to prove that there must be a God (30) b. Assess the strengths and weaknesses of the cosmological argument. Part B Even though Aquinas puts forth a convincing argument about the existence of the universe; some critics have opposed to this claim as they do not believe it is sufficient evidence. One argument against Aquinas is the fact that he seems to contradict himself in the second way by saying that nothing...
    317 Words | 1 Page
  • explain Aquinas' Cosmological argument
    Explain Aquinas’ Cosmological Argument Thomas Aquinas developed five ways to prove Gods existence. The first three are key to the Cosmological argument. These are from motion, causation, and contingency. He presented his work on these in the Summa Theologica, where he accepts that it may be impossible to prove the God of Classical theism caused the universe to exist, but believes that what God does proves Gods existence. The first way is from motion, Aquinas emphasises that motion means...
    939 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Cosmological Argument Is Not a Strong Argument for the Existence of God
    The Cosmological Argument is not a Strong Argument for the Existence of God Mardi Campbell PHI 208 Prof. Michele Clearman-Warner March 11, 2013 The Cosmological Argument is not a Strong Argument for the Existence of God The Cosmological Argument for the existence of God is one of the most famous of all philosophical arguments that address the existence of a supernatural being who created the material universe. The supernatural being whom created the material universe is the...
    2,130 Words | 6 Pages
  • to what extent is the cosmological argument a weak argument
    To what extent is the cosmological argument weak? Although the cosmological argument is a strong argument for the theory that the universe it is a weak argument for the existence of the classical theological God. Thomas Aquinas was a very important man to the cosmological argument; it was him who came up with some of the strongest theories to support the argument. He came up with his five proofs which to him proved the cosmological argument to be true. One of his proof was the ‘cause’...
    495 Words | 2 Pages
  • Cosmological - 347 Words
    Cosmological arguments Kalam cosmological argument The aim of this argument is to show that the universe had a beginning in the finite past. The argument battles against the existence of an infinite, temporal regress of past events which implies a universe that has infinitely existed. This argument implies the existence of a First Cause. The form of the argument is: 1. Whatever begins to exist has a cause. 2. The universe began to exist. 3. Therefore, the universe has a cause. Thomistic...
    347 Words | 2 Pages
  • St Thomas Aquinas version of The Cosmological Argument
    St Thomas Aquinas version of The Cosmological Argument Aquinas developed the five ways to prove the existence of God. He based his arguments on what could be observed, his observations included that the universe moves and changes. From his observations he reached conclusions about the existence of God. However, Aquinas did actually accept the fact that he may not prove that the cause of the universe is the God of classical theism. He also did not accept infinity because he believed that there...
    519 Words | 2 Pages
  • Explain the Strengths and Weaknesses of Aquinas' Cosmological Argument
    a) Explain the strengths and weaknesses of Aquinas’ cosmological arguments. The cosmological argument is an a posteriori argument based on the question of the relation of the universe’s existence and God’s existence. This argument focuses on the theory that if the universe exists then something must have caused it to existence, ie. A God or Creator. Supporters of this argument claim that to fully comprehend the existence of the universe, one must rely on a theory of a God however critics...
    1,203 Words | 4 Pages
  • Outline the Cosmological Argument for the Existence of God (21)
    Outline the cosmological argument for the existence of God (21) The Cosmological argument is an argument that attempts to prove the existence of God, it is also known as the causation argument which argues that as all events require a cause, if the universe is an event it must have a cause and that cause is God. The argument is a posteriori because its based on evidence that already exists in the universe. The cosmological argument is also inductive because the conclusion is...
    815 Words | 3 Pages
  • Cosmological Arguement - 1061 Words
    The cosmological argument is a collection of arguments for the existence of God, based on the fact of the world’s existence. It was first posited by famous Greek philosophers, Plato and Aristotle. They postulated the need for a craftsman for the universe and began their argument with the fact of motion. The basis of the argument state that the universe cannot cause...
    1,061 Words | 3 Pages
  • Examine the main strengths of the cosmological argument for the existence of God (21 marks)
    Examine the main strengths of the cosmological argument for the existence of God (21 marks) The main question the cosmological argument ponders thought on is ‘Why is there a universe at all?’ The cosmological argument asks the scientific question behind the universe as the design argument asks an emotional one. One of the main strengths of the cosmological argument was brought forward again recently by William Lane Craig. The argument tries to say that the world couldn’t have just occurred,...
    567 Words | 2 Pages
  • cosmological arguement on the existence of god
    Among the arguments that try to prove the existence of God, the Cosmological Argument or First Cause Argument is a popular one. It comes from the Greek word 'cosmo' meaning universe and 'logos' meaning study. The Cosmological Argument states that nothing can have no cause yet God is the first cause, labeling God as an unmoved mover. This seemingly fallacious part of the argument has invoked a lot of criticism. The argument is ' A Posteriori' which means it is based on experience of the world...
    415 Words | 1 Page
  • Weakness in Cosmological Arguement - 980 Words
    To understand the weakness in the philosophic theory of cosmological argument you have to understand what the argument even means. The Cosmological Argument attempts to prove that God exists by showing that there cannot be an infinite number of regressions of causes to things that exist (Slick, “The Cosmological Argument”). It states that there must be a final uncaused-cause of all things. This uncaused-cause is asserted to be God exist (Slick, “The Cosmological Argument”). The basic break...
    980 Words | 3 Pages
  • David Hume And The Cosmological Argumen
    “Hume’s criticisms of the cosmological argument do not succeed.” Discuss (10 marks) I believe that David Hume’s criticisms against the cosmological argument are insufficient. Hume’s argument is based around two main points, the idea that explaining the parts of the universe is sufficient instead of an explanation of the universe as a whole and that the causal principle is questionable. Hume states that if you can explain the parts of something then you don’t need to explain the process as a...
    437 Words | 1 Page
  • is the ontological argument the strongest argument for the existence of god, is it defendable?
    A defense of the ontological argument Daniel Andrews In this essay I will first explain the ontological argument and my reasons for choosing it. I will then discuss why I believe it is a better account for the existence of god than the teleological argument and the cosmological argument. I will then move onto discuss various theologians that oppose the ontological argument and critique their responses. The aim of the essay if to show the strength of the argument and to expose some key...
    1,993 Words | 6 Pages
  • Aquinas' 2nd Argument - 828 Words
    The Cosmological Argument has been disputed over since the beginning of religion. Greek philosophers such as Plato, Aristotle, and other theologians have provided reasons for either their belief or disbelief of the existence almighty being; God. Thomas Aquinas adapted a personal answer for the controversial argument. Aquinas provides five ways for the existence of God that he devised through his observations and logical analysis. His arguments provide reasoning for many people that cannot...
    828 Words | 2 Pages
  • Apologetical Causation Argument - 712 Words
    Apologetical Causation Argument Since the dawn of life, man has pondered the meaning of his existence. Where did he come from? How did he get here? How was the universe formed? With respect to the previous questions, there are two primary sides taken in the age-old debate. There are the creationists and the non-creationists. The creationists believe there is an omnipotent creator of the universe whereas the non-creationists believe there is no creator, but that the universe simply...
    712 Words | 2 Pages
  • Rowe Cosmotologial Argument - 1273 Words
    Outline of Rowe's Chapter on the Argument from Contingency in His Philosophy of Religion, Part II Notes on Rowe on the Cosmological Argument, Part Two: Four Criticisms of the Argument 0. Review 0.1 Dependent beings: a being whose existence is accounted for by the causal activity of other beings 0.2 Self-existent beings: beings whose existence is self-explanatory, or accounted for by their own inner nature 0.3 The Principle of Sufficient Reason (PSR): There must be an explanation for (a)...
    1,273 Words | 4 Pages
  • Aquinas's Arguments for the Existence of God
    Are Aquinas' arguments for the existence of God convincing? Do they have any value? Needless to say, Aquinas upset many of the popular theological ideas prevalent before him. Even though his work was unfinished at the time of his death, his ideas were brought into the theology of the church, giving Christianity a genuine intellectual and rational foundation. Aquinas' work influenced the philosophical climate of the day and gave reason a legitimate place in Christian theology. One of...
    1,338 Words | 4 Pages
  • Aquinas' first argument for the existence of God
    The cosmological argument is attempting to show through reason that a cosmos needs an explanation. The cosmological argument is an a posteriori argument because it is based upon empirical data which we only discovered through being on this planet. The claim is that the universe cannot account for its own existence and so this argument seeks causes that have their solutions in the existence of a God. It suggests that God is in esse and humans are in fieri. The first part of this principle is...
    434 Words | 1 Page
  • Different Arguments and Perspectives: Does God Really Exist?
    The mere existence of a greater being, God has been a debate for longer than almost any other scientific in history. We are told that McCloskey refers to arguments as proofs and often implies that they cannot definitively establish the case for God, so therefore they should be abandoned. He says that because these arguments/debates, have no proof he dismisses the term argument and refers to them as “proofs”. McCloskey states that theists do not believe in God because said proofs but rather than...
    1,490 Words | 4 Pages
  • Does the First Cause Argument Prove That God Exists?
    ‘The First Cause Argument Proves that God Exists.’ Do You Agree? The First cause, or cosmological, argument suggested by Thomas Aquinas is that everything that comes into being must have a cause. They can’t cause themselves, so they must be caused by something outside themselves. This chain can’t regress forever, so there must be a transcendent power that began the chain. That is god. Another argument, the Kalam Cosmological argument, states that everything that comes into being must...
    797 Words | 3 Pages
  • How Convincing Is the Kalam Argument as Proof of the Existence of Allah
    How convincing is the Kalam argument as proof of the existence of Allah The first premise is relatively uncontroversial, and is rooted in the metaphysical principle that out of nothing, nothing comes. The denial of the first premise, although strictly logically possible, is metaphysically unactualizable. By definition, nothing has no potentialities. Thus, it is impossible for something to arise out of nothing, for how can its existence be actualized if the potential is not there? The truth of...
    764 Words | 2 Pages
  • Do you agree the first cause argument proves God's existence?
    Do you agree that the first cause argument proves that God exists? The first cause argument takes the existence of the universe to entail the existence of a being that created it. It does so based on the fact that the universe had a beginning. There must, the first cause argument says, be something that caused that beginning, a first cause of the universe. I do believe that the first cause argument proves God’s existence. This is because the universe consists of a series of events stretched...
    458 Words | 2 Pages
  • Naturalism Versus Christianity - 3866 Words
     Apologetics Application Paper Final Mike McDowell APOL 500 7 November 2013 Naturalism versus Christianity Naturalism is a prominent worldview that is held and praised widely in today’s modern world. However, when examined closely and held up to certain criteria that would establish it as a legitimate worldview, one can see that it comes up short in several areas such as the source of morality, internal logical...
    3,866 Words | 11 Pages
  • Response Paper Instructions - 1075 Words
    Response Paper Instructions Having completed the unit of philosophy of religion, you are now ready to respond to an article written by an actual atheist. This article titled “On Being an Atheist,” was written by H. J. McCloskey in 1968 for the journal Question. McCloskey is an Australian philosopher who wrote a number of atheistic works in the 1960s and 70s including the book God and Evil (Nijhoff, 1974). In this article, McCloskey is both critical of the classical arguments for God’s...
    1,075 Words | 4 Pages
  • St. Thomas Aquinas - 340 Words
    Summary of St. Thomas Aquinas’ 5 Ways of Proving God’s Existence In the thirteenth century, St. Thomas Aquinas formulated the famous ‘Five Ways’ of proving God’s existence. These five ways were not regarded as proofs in a scientific way but rather it is a step, in the sense of believing God. The ‘Five Ways’ are: First, The Argument of Unmoved Mover. It states that whatever is in motion is moved by another thing; that thing is also moved by something. So, in order to prevent continuity, you...
    340 Words | 1 Page
  • On Being an Atheist - 1378 Words
    The purpose of the paper is to answer several questions arising from an article by H. J. McCloskey entitled “On Being an Atheist”. McCloskey makes the claim that he is reminding fellow atheist why they believe there is no God. He claims that the traditional proofs have no merit. I believe the sheer magnitude and complexity of the world we live in is strong evidence of an intelligent designer and creator. Only an intelligent creator could form a world where the air that we breathe is part...
    1,378 Words | 4 Pages
  • What Is Philosophy of Religion
    1. What is Philosophy of religion? is a branch of philosophy that asks questions about religion. Philosophy of religion is a branch of philosophy that asks questions about religion. It addresses not only the perennial question “Is there a God?” but also the questions If there is, then what is he like? and, most important of all, What does that mean for us? 2. Give a brief history of the “philosophies” of religion. Ancient Philosophy,Medieval Philosophy, Early Modern Philosophy,...
    776 Words | 3 Pages
  • Archuna Ananthamohan - 351 Words
    Does Aquinas’ Cosmological Argument prove the existence of God? The Cosmological Argument is, to this day, one of the most powerful arguments used by theists. The essence of the argument has historically rooted to the era of Plato, Parmenides and Aristotle. However, the ideas were fully-developed during medieval Christianity and the argument is often attributed to St Thomas Aquinas. Whilst there have been many variations and refinements to the argument, the in cause, in esse, in fieri and...
    351 Words | 1 Page
  • William Harvey - 915 Words
    William Harvey was a British physician who did what all good modern scientists are taught to do; which is upon coming across an inexplicable phenomenon, compose a hypothesis, research, collect data, devise a theory, then share this information with fellow scientists. . He obtained a Doctor of Physic diploma from the University of Padua in 1602. But Human Heredity, in the biological sense, was for many centuries only a metaphor. Because of his family status, Harvey had no problem obtaining a...
    915 Words | 3 Pages
  • Aquinas and Philosophy - 1042 Words
    Philosophy Essay Question: Explain how Thomas Aquinas tries to prove Gods Existence (30) St. Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274) was a Catholic Italian Monk who was regarded to be one of the most important philosophers of the medieval period. Aquinas had adopted the works of Aristotle's analysis of physical objects, his view of place, time and motion, his proof of the prime mover and his cosmology. He tried to connect the Christian faith together with the Philosophy of Aristotle’s work in his...
    1,042 Words | 3 Pages
  • God Is the Most Likely Explanation for the Universe
    Science goes along way back into the history of the universe. The current most popular theory of the origin of the universe is the big band theory. But all this leaves the question, what caused the big bang? Science cannot yet explain this making it open to religious speculation. This is the basis of the cosmological argument. The cosmological argument proves the existence of god from the idea that there is a first cause of the universe. Aquinas version of the cosmological argument try?s to...
    315 Words | 1 Page
  • Prime Mover Essay - 598 Words
    Aristotle believed that there had to be one primary cause for the world to make sense. There must be something that triggered off the ‘chain of movement’. The Prime Mover is the ‘Uncaused First Cause’, both the unmoved mover and the final cause. As a result this means that all of earth and existence is in a constant stage of movement and change., Aristotle is similar in his thinking to just like another philosopher, Heraclitus, who believed everything is in a dramatic state of change and, that...
    598 Words | 2 Pages
  • Is There a God? - 1427 Words
    The debate of the existence of one, or many, divine beings is one of the oldest in human history and, for many people; a definite, conclusive answer is highly sought-after. This debate is considered so important to many as it is an ultimate question which means, without intervention of an unfamiliar reality, it is considered impossible to be conclusively proved or disproved. Therefore, it is discussed at length in an attempt to provide an answer or to try explain other human experiences such as...
    1,427 Words | 5 Pages
  • Russell and Copleston - 794 Words
    Précis of radio debate on the Cosmological Argument between Frederick Copleston and Bertrand Russell (1947). In 1947, two great philosophers took to the airwaves to debate the existence of God. The debate that took place has become one of the most famous moments in radio history. The two philosophers were Fr. Frederick Copleston S.J., a Jesuit priest and later principal of Heythrop College and Bertrand Russell, veteran CND campaigner and one of the most important philosophers of all time....
    794 Words | 3 Pages
  • the mind game - 1141 Words
    PKG The argument on whether god does or does not exist has been the topic of a lot of heated debates in these recent years. With the growing number of independent thinkers in todays society, the question still remains “Does God really exist”? Philosophers have contemplated and presented different arguments attempting to explain the question, “Does God Exist?” for hundreds of years there hasn’t been any rock solid proof that God does or does not exist. It is my opinion that the strongest...
    1,141 Words | 3 Pages
  • Jacqueline's Studies - 486 Words
    Jacqueline Gott ENG-106 Composition II Sunday May 18, 2013 Professor Wesley Bell ENG-106 Composition II Causal Essay Part I: Outline Template Assignment Directions: 1) Outline your Causal Essay by following the template below. 2) You do not need to write whole paragraphs for any of the below sections. You simply need to write complete sentences that show the basic outline of your essay. Doing this will give you a guide when writing your rough draft. ENG-106 Causal Essay...
    486 Words | 2 Pages
  • Root Cause - 361 Words
    ROOT CAUSE: In this case, we believe that there are three main root causes from the management of this company, especially in packaging department. The first main one is cohesiveness limited the productivity in packaging department. Cohesiveness for packing department was existent and had become somewhat negative. Employees were mimicking the bad behavior of one another and were failing to get anywhere production wise. Packing department seemed to be small knit group and they were able to...
    361 Words | 1 Page
  • Cosmo Essay - 1129 Words
    Cosmo Essay Raegan Gilbertson The Cosmological Argument is an a posteriori argument which attempts to prove that there is a rational basis for the belief in God. The argument attempts to prove that God exists by evaluating the scale and nature of the cosmos. Most supporters of the cosmological argument argue that the universe could only have come into existence if it were caused by an uncaused cause. There is evidence to suggest that the universe is contingent (for example the big bang)....
    1,129 Words | 3 Pages
  • Philosophy (the Existence of God)
    In my essay I decided to take on the second and third topics. I’ll first address and examine Anselm’s ontological argument for the existence of God while restating and critically examining Aquinas’s first argument for the existence of God. After I finish with that topic I will then take on Paley and his argument and whether or not it thoroughly proves the existence of God conceived as a supremely perfect being and why or why not this is. During this topic I will bring in Dawkins’ and Hume’s...
    1,586 Words | 4 Pages
  • Atheist - 1707 Words
     The “Proof’s” of God’s Existence: A Response to H.J. McCloskey’s “On Being an Atheist” 1 2 3 I. Introduction In this paper, I will be making a response to...
    1,707 Words | 5 Pages
  • Cause And Effect Paragraph - 274 Words
    There are several reasons and causes why students may drop out of school. The first cause being that many students are not school driven because they may have distractions outside of school such as financial and personal problems. I know from experience that it’s not always easy to stay focused in school if you’re stressed about wondering how you’re going to pay the bills, or if you’re in an argument with a spouse or family member. Another cause is students may drop out is if an unplanned...
    274 Words | 1 Page
  • The Existence of God - 2733 Words
    Danielle Introduction to Philosophy April 23. 2013 The Existence of God The existence of God has been questioned, pondered, sought out and studied for hundreds, no, thousands of years since the beginning of time. “Does God exist?” “What do certain philosophers have to say about the existence of God?” “What do Christianity and Atheism have to say?” “What about those who say they have experienced God?” “If He does exist, what is He like?” “Why...
    2,733 Words | 7 Pages
  • Thomas Aquinas's Five Ways
    Pierson Laughlin
 Thomas Aquinas’s Five Ways In the beginning of the 13th century, philosopher Thomas Aquinas demonstrated five famous proofs for the existence of God. The first of these proofs is the argument from motion. Aquinas explains that everything is moving, both though time and space, and that each and everything that is moving must be set into motion by a mover. Therefore Aquinas concludes that in the beginning, there must have been an original unmoved mover that has set our world...
    527 Words | 2 Pages
  • Response Paper Mccloskey Article (278.205 Kb)
    Response Paper McCloskey Article (278.205 Kb) Having completed the unit of philosophy of religion, you are now ready to respond to an article written by an actual atheist. This article, titled “On Being an Atheist,” was written by H. J. McCloskey in 1968 for the journal Question. McCloskey is an Australian philosopher who wrote a number of atheistic works in the 1960s and 70s including the book God and Evil (Nijhoff, 1974). In this article, McCloskey is both critical of the classical...
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  • Psychology Essay - 514 Words
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