Cognitive dissonance Essays & Research Papers

Best Cognitive dissonance Essays

  • Cognitive Dissonance - 530 Words
    Solving a cognitive dissonance is a good way to look at all your cards on the table, so to speak. The definition of cognitive dissonance is "A feeling of discomfort caused by a discrepancy between an attitude and a behavior or between two attitudes." (S.Carpenter, K. Huffman 2010). This is means that cognitive dissonance is a problem that involves how you feel and what you are doing to cause the problem. For an example: a man has stolen a car. He feels upset that he has stolen the car but he is...
    530 Words | 2 Pages
  • Cognitive Dissonance - 717 Words
    Cognitive Dissonance Julie Cortez-Knapp Week 2 Assignment 2 Week 2 M.Hufnagel Cognitive Dissonance We are all customers. We all purchase items every day out of need or desire. Every day we are marketed to. We are satisfied with our purchases and have no regrets, most of the time. Other times, we purchase high risk items like computers or cars. The higher risk items bring higher chances of cognitive dissonance aka buyers’ remorse. There is cultural,...
    717 Words | 3 Pages
  • Cognitive Dissonance - 719 Words
    Cognitive dissonance refers to a situation involving conflicting attitudes, beliefs or behaviors. This situation produces a feeling of discomfort or dissonance leading to an alteration in one of the attitudes, beliefs or behaviors to reduce the discomfort and restore balance etc. For example, when someone is forced to do something publicly that they privately really don't want to do, dissonance is created between their cognition (I didn't want to do this) and their behavior (I did it). The...
    719 Words | 2 Pages
  • Cognitive Dissonance - 918 Words
    Cognitive Dissonance is a psychological discomfort caused by inconsistency among a person's belief, attitudes, and or actions. There are three hypotheses that explain the theory. The first hypothesis is selective exposure which is the tendency to avoid information inconsistent with one's belief and attitudes. One only accepts information that is consistent with their own thoughts. Hypothesis two is post-decision dissonance; which are close call decisions and can affect a decision one makes. And...
    918 Words | 2 Pages
  • All Cognitive dissonance Essays

  • cognitive dissonance - 1357 Words
     Cognitive Dissonance Paper PSY/ 400 August 12, 2013 Cognitive Dissonance Paper As individuals sometimes we will make conscious decisions that involve our behavior that may violate his or her cognitions. Our cognitions that may be violated are values, beliefs, attitudes, and morals. One situation that an individual partakes in is stealing that he or she decided to do knowingly. To understand why we all behave in a certain situation like stealing the cognitive dissonance...
    1,357 Words | 4 Pages
  • Cognitive Dissonance - 2250 Words
    Assignment for The Fourth Batch, Second Semester BSS (Hons.) * Session : 2009-2010. * Course no. : MCJ-106. * Course name : Mass Communication: Structure & Process * Assigned by : Shaonti Haider. * Assignment prepared by: Khandaker Tanjima Elham Bristy. (Roll no. - 45) Communication is an essential process in our everyday life. Each & every moment we communicate- with others or with ourselves. Communication is a...
    2,250 Words | 7 Pages
  • Cognitive Dissonance - 2073 Words
    Cognitive Dissonance How do human beings make decisions? What triggers a person to take action at any given point? These are all questions that I will attempt to answer with my theoretical research into Leon Festinger's theory of cognitive dissonance, as well as many of the other related theories. We often do not realize the psychological events that take place in our everyday lives. It is important to take notice of theories, such as the balance theory, the congruency theory and the...
    2,073 Words | 6 Pages
  • Cognitive Dissonance - 1174 Words
    Isaac Petersen 5/23/13 Honors Psych Cognitive Dissonance Cognitive dissonance theory has been around since the late fifties. It has inspired many psychologists to figure out the murky depths of people’s minds. The theory relates strongly to decision making, social phenomenons and mental angst. Many paradigms exist within cognitive dissonance. Two important paradigms are the Belief Disconfirmation paradigm and the Free Choice paradigm. There are several experiments that have been studied that...
    1,174 Words | 4 Pages
  • Cognitive Dissonance - 406 Words
    cognitive dissonance theory & unconscious motivation When it comes to the cognitive dissonance theory the first thing to do is know what it is . So cognitive dissonance theory is a term that is can be used described as a feeling of some kind of discomfort that can come from holding two different conflicting beliefs at the same time. Some things that are part of the theme is that, cognitive dissonace can reduse the dissonance simply by changing one’s attutude, behaviors, and even beliefs....
    406 Words | 1 Page
  • Cognitive Dissonance - 680 Words
    Cognitive Dissonance According to Leon Festinger and Elliot Aronson cognitive dissonance is a feeling of discomfort caused by holding two inconsistent cognitions and is caused by actions that are discrepant to one’s self-concept (Smyth, 2013, Jan. 24). During my first year at the University of Virginia, I was contemplating whether or not to join a fraternity. During my first semester in college, I would go to fraternity parties and get intoxicated at least two to three times per week and made...
    680 Words | 2 Pages
  • Cognitive Dissonance - 1191 Words
    Cognitive Dissonance Cognitive dissonance is having a thought, idea, attitude, or belief that seems to be out of tune. Cognitive dissonance tends to result in different ways based on the situation that it occurs in. If a person is forced to say an opinion that differs from their own, they experience an out of tune feeling. In Roger Hock’s book “Forty Studies that Changed Psychology,” he recognizes the study of cognitive dissonance performed by Leon Festinger. In “Thoughts Out of Tune,” the...
    1,191 Words | 5 Pages
  • Cognitive Dissonance - 3560 Words
    Theory of Cognitive Dissonance Contents Introduction to the Theory of Cognitive Dissonance…………………………………………………………..3 Theories and Research in Cognitive Dissonance………………………………………………………………….4 Cognitive Dissonance - Driving the Escalation of Commitment…………………………………………..6 Cognitive dissonance in the workplace……………………………………………………………………………….8 WAYS TO REDUCE COGNITIVE DISSONANCE……………………………………………………………………….9 HOW CAN A MANAGER/ORGANIZATION HELP REDUCE COGNITIVE...
    3,560 Words | 10 Pages
  • Cognitive Dissonance - 704 Words
    Cognitive dissonance refers to any situation involving conflicting beliefs, attitudes, or behaviors. According to the text, A First Look at Communication Theory, cognitive dissonance is the distressing mental state that people feel when they find themselves doing things that don’t fit with what they know, or having opinions that do not fit with other opinions they hold. This produces a feeling of discomfort, which leads to a change in one of the beliefs, attitudes, or behaviors to reduce...
    704 Words | 2 Pages
  • cognitive dissonance - 3849 Words
    The theory of cognitive dissonance By Adam Kowol Contents: 1. INTRODUCTION.................................................................................................... 2 2. FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS AND PRINCIPLES........................................... 2 3. MAJOR COGNITIVE DISSONANCE PHENOMENA ...................................... 4 4. REVISIONS AND ALTERNATIVE INTERPRETATIONS .............................. 9 5. TENTATIVE ASSESSMENT OF THE...
    3,849 Words | 13 Pages
  • Assignment on Cognitive Dissonance - 1411 Words
    Theory Paper on Cognitive Dissonance Theory “Sometimes people hold a core belief that is very strong. When they are presented with evidence that works against that belief, the new evidence cannot be accepted. It would create a feeling that is extremely uncomfortable, called cognitive dissonance. And because it is so important to protect the core belief, they will rationalize, ignore and even deny anything that doesn't fit in with the core belief.” ― Frantz Fanon, Black Skin, White...
    1,411 Words | 5 Pages
  • Cognitive Dissonance Theory - 1940 Words
    According to cognitive dissonance theory, there is a tendency for individuals to seek consistency among their cognitions (beliefs, expectations, or opinions of a particular individual). When inconsistency does exist between these beliefs or attitudes, psychological tension (dissonance) occurs and must be resolved through some action. This tension most often results when an individual must choose between two incompatible beliefs or actions and is heightened when alternatives are equally...
    1,940 Words | 6 Pages
  • Cognitive Dissonance Paper - 1656 Words
    Introduction The words Cognitive Dissonance were fascinatingly interesting; therefore more research went into the origin of these two words. Both words are Middle English, which was the English in use from 12th to 15th centuries and both used in the 15th century [ (Merriam-Webster, 2011) ]. Cognitive is an adjective meaning, there is physical activity involving the mind; be it: thinking, reasoning or remembering. Dissonance is a noun meaning, when there is a tug-of- war between one’s actions...
    1,656 Words | 5 Pages
  • Cognitive Dissonance Theory - 1621 Words
    Leon Festinger created the cognitive dissonance theory as an attempt to explain why people desire to have consistency between their behaviors and actions. Cognitive dissonance is the distressing mental state people feel when they find themselves doing things that don’t fit with what they know, or having opinions that do not fit with other opinions they hold (Festinger, 1957; as cited in Griffin, 2009). Thus, people are motivated to change either their behavior or their belief when feelings of...
    1,621 Words | 5 Pages
  • Working with Adolescents - Cognitive Dissonance:
    Working with Adolescents - Assignment 1: Contents: Introduction: Definition of adolescents Adolescent Identity Development: a theoretical overview Definition of Cognitive Dissonance A theoretical Overview of Cognitive Dissonance and its relation to understanding adolescents Assisting counsellors in working with adolescents who experience symptoms of cognitive dissonance. Introduction: In this assignment I will be doing a case study (made up) on an adolescent named Mark. I will be...
    2,865 Words | 9 Pages
  • Cognitive Dissonance in Marital Satisfaction
    Introduction Most people get married because they love their partner. They like the way they are with each other, honest, loving, understanding, fun, etc. Some are arranged marriage as they are unable to find the love of their life. However some get divorced as they are no longer compatible and they get turn off very easily. They are frustrated and bored. For those who want to continue to stay in an unhappy marriage due to many reasons such as the kids, their reputation, family, etc. as...
    1,011 Words | 4 Pages
  • Cognitive Dissonance Theory Paper
    Cognitive Dissonance Theory Paper 1 Cognitive Dissonance Theory Paper Psy 400 Axia Online Cognitive Dissonance Theory Paper 2 Introduction The cognitive dissonance theory has many possible scenarios and examples chosen throughout life. The theory will be either enhanced or decreased depending on a number of factors such as the person’s moral values, social upbringing, and social status at work, religious...
    1,359 Words | 4 Pages
  • Cognitive Dissonance in Religion and Spirituality
    Cognitive Dissonance in Religion Cognitive Dissonance in Religion and Spirituality Chew Hock Kee Student ID: B1102483 Department of Psychology MC-502 Dr. Goh Chee Leong 27 Feb 2012 1 Cognitive Dissonance in Religion Cognitive dissonance theory was developed by Leon Festinger more than fifty years ago as the most influential consistency theory of attitudes (Fanzoi, 2009). This theory argues that we often justify and rationalise our behavior in order to maintain cognitive consistency...
    1,232 Words | 4 Pages
  • Impact of Cognitive Dissonance - 1637 Words
     Impact of Cognitive Dissonance Northcentral University Impact of Cognitive Dissonance What is cognitive dissonance? Is this a hard concept to understand? For this assignment, utilize your readings for this week to critically analyze and make a determination about who makes a stronger argument (Festinger and Carlsmith or Bem) about the impact of cognitive dissonance. Explain clearly why you feel the argument is stronger (or conversely, why the other argument is...
    1,637 Words | 5 Pages
  • "Good Will Hunting": Cognitive Dissonance
    Will Hunting, played by Matt Damon, in the movie "Good Will Hunting" is the epitome of a psychological paradigm. He can be analyzed in so many ways, touching on many of the different fields of psychology. The most interesting thing about Will is the cognitive dissonance he goes through throughout the film. He is torn between these two cognitions, both of which contradict each other. One of these cognitions is the fact that he is an orphan from South Boston, meaning he should only have a low pay...
    606 Words | 2 Pages
  • Cognitive Dissonance Paper - 1169 Words
     Cognitive Dissonance Student Name PSY/400 Instructor Date Situation and Subsequent Behavior Richard is driving along a lonely road late at night after working late that day. He has a 4-year-old daughter who he has not spent much time with the entire week because of the long project that makes him work late. Similarly, he has not been having dinner with his family because he always gets home past dinner time. On this particular day, Richard leaves work a bit earlier in an...
    1,169 Words | 4 Pages
  • Cognitive Dissonance Theory - 1049 Words
    The theory of Cognitive Dissonance states that when individuals are presented with information that implies we act in a way that contradicts our moral standards, we experience discomfort (Aronson, Wilson, and Akert, 1998, P. 191). This is considered Cognitive Dissonance, A psychological term used to describe mental conflict that occurs when beliefs or assumptions are contradicted by new information; arouses unease or tension; relieved by one of several defensive maneuvers: rejecting,...
    1,049 Words | 3 Pages
  • Cognitive Dissonance Classic in Psychology
    Cognitive Dissonance Classic in Psychology Areej Alemer [Instructor’s Name] [Class Title] [Date] Cognitive Dissonance Classic in Psychology Introduction There were famous experiments conducted in psychology and many of these experiments gave scientists a new perspective on understanding people. In the 1950s, scientists began conducting test about the effect of social pressures and influence to the behavior of people. Among these scientists is Leon Festinger. He...
    3,444 Words | 10 Pages
  • The Role of Cognitive Dissonance in Decision Making
    The Role of Cognitive Dissonance in Decision Making Introduction When making decisions humans commonly fall victim to errors in logic and reasoning. Since the inception of the study of the mind, psychologists have endeavored to isolate the characteristics and causes of errors in human thinking. Researchers and theorists have developed categories of such errors: representativeness heuristics, availability heuristics, memory and hindsight biases, etc. . . . In other words, to err is human....
    2,285 Words | 7 Pages
  • Is the Purpose of Advertising to Create Cognitive Dissonance?
    Introduction Advertising deals with people's feelings and emotions. It includes understanding of the psychology of the buyer, his motives, attitudes, as well as the influences on him such as his family and reference groups, social class and culture. In order to increase the advertisements persuasiveness, advertisers use many types of extensions of behavioral sciences to marketing and buying behavior. One such extension is the theory of cognitive dissonance. The purpose of advertising can be to...
    1,775 Words | 5 Pages
  • Is the Purpose of Advertising to Create Cognitive Dissonance
    Advertising deals with people's feelings and emotions. It includes understanding of the psychology of the buyer, his motives, attitudes, as well as the influences on him such as his family and reference groups, social class and culture. In order to increase the advertisements persuasiveness, advertisers use many types of extensions of behavioural sciences to marketing and buying behaviour. One such extension is the theory of cognitive dissonance. The purpose of advertising can be to create a...
    1,988 Words | 6 Pages
  • Cognitive Dissonance (no copyright infringement intended)
    The Journal of Socio-Economics 38 (2009) 658–662 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect The Journal of Socio-Economics journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/soceco Two sources of human irrationality: Cognitive dissonance and brain dysfunction David Lester a,∗ , Bijou Yang b a b Psychology Program, The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, Jimmie Leeds Road, Pomona, NJ 08240-0195, USA Department of Economics and International Business, Drexel University, Philadelphia,...
    3,921 Words | 15 Pages
  • Cognitive - 1253 Words
    Cognitive Dissonance theory Core Assumptions and Statements Cognitive dissonance is a communication theory adopted from social psychology. The title gives the concept: cognitive is thinking or the mind; and dissonance is inconsistency or conflict. Cognitive dissonance is the psychological conflict from holding two or more incompatible beliefs simultaneously. Cognitive dissonance is a relatively straightforward social psychology theory that has enjoyed wide acceptance in a variety of...
    1,253 Words | 4 Pages
  • Cognitive Dissonance Analysis: Stepping Out of Assigned Roles
    Running Head: Cognitive Dissonance Analysis Cognitive Dissonance Analysis: Stepping Out of Assigned Roles Randi Cutler Lehigh University Abstract Research conducted by Leon Festinger and James M. Carlsmith has shown promise for the effects of cognitive dissonance on personal belief, and the adjustment of those beliefs to match publicly supported, yet contradictory arguments. We are testing to see whether the cognitive dissonance theory can be overcome by explicitly telling...
    2,152 Words | 6 Pages
  • cognitive dissonance and post purchase process exchange
     Cognitive Dissonance and Post Purchase Process Evaluation Christen Cox Marketing November 22, 2013 Holly Andrews What is Cognitive Dissonance and Consumer’s Post Purchase Evaluation Process? I am writing an informative paper that will give many bits of information on mainly cognitive dissonance and consumer’s post purchase evaluation process. I will write about the consumer’s post purchase evaluation process and cognitive dissonance. I am going to explain everything about the...
    1,035 Words | 3 Pages
  • Describe Cognitive Dissonance and Describe How It Is Influenced by Culture
    Précis 7 – Describe cognitive dissonance and describe how it is influenced by culture. Cognitive Dissonance Theory is a theory of attitude change proposing that inconsistency exists among our attitudes, or between our attitudes and behavior, we experience an unpleasant state of arousal called cognitive dissonance, which we will be motivated to reduce or eliminate. (Bordens & Horowitz 2001) This is a theory, which has been transformed over many decades. Cognitive Dissonance varies...
    1,166 Words | 4 Pages
  • Cognitie Dissonance - 542 Words
    Introduction What is cognitive dissonance? How can it be used in our daily lives? These are some of the questions that social psychologists ask each day to explain people’s behavior. When it comes to how we act as individuals, there are all kinds of words and expressions that we can use. We can use words that can describe us physically, mentally, and emotionally, but when it comes to the way that we describe ourselves in our social worlds, we have a harder time. Dealing with our social worlds...
    542 Words | 2 Pages
  • Cog Dissonance - 3204 Words
    Festinger's (1957) cognitive dissonance theory suggests that we have an inner drive to hold all our attitudes and beliefs in harmony and avoid disharmony (or dissonance). Cognitive dissonance refers to a situation involving conflicting attitudes, beliefs or behaviors. This produces a feeling of discomfort leading to an alteration in one of the attitudes, beliefs or behaviors to reduce the discomfort and restore balance etc. As an other definition we can say that; People tend to seek consistency...
    3,204 Words | 9 Pages
  • Cognitive Dissonace - 1480 Words
    Cognitive Dissonance Willard White Psych 555 May 27, 2013 Dr. Brian Uldall Abstract Cognitive dissonance can be referred as an attempt by an individual to maintain equality between one’s attitudes, and one’s actions. To understand better cognitive dissonance, an examination of the concept of cognitive dissonance is necessary. During this examination, a brief analysis on the issue of does cognitive dissonance explains why behavior can change attitudes will be discussed. The...
    1,480 Words | 5 Pages
  • PSYCH 555 Week 3 Learning Team Assignment Issue Analysis Cognitive Dissonance
    This work includes PSYCH 555 Week 3 Learning Team Assignment Issue Analysis Cognitive Dissonance Psychology - General Psychology Prepare a 1,050 to 1,400-word analysis of Issue 5, “Does Cognitive Dissonance Explain Why Behavior Can Change Attitudes?” located in the Taking Sides text. As a part of your analysis be sure to address the following items: Briefly summarize both arguments discussed in Issue 5. Define consonant and dissonant cognitions. Using the arguments made in...
    457 Words | 2 Pages
  • overcome cognitive dissonace through advertiesment
    Case Study on > The Techniques Used By The Marketers To Overcome The Cognitive Dissonance Of Customers Subject 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Group members Shaikh Mo.Farhan Solanki Snehal Vasani Tushar Parmar Paras Dhanani Nilesh Rana Vinus Safiwala Sanjay Timbadiya Viren Roll No. 82 87 95 61 102 110 114 98 Cognitive Dissonance No. Particulars 1 Introduction 2 Theory & Research 3 Applications of Research 4 Overcoming Dissonance 5...
    5,860 Words | 21 Pages
  • Mistakes We Made - 1444 Words
    ‘Mistakes we made’ is one of the best books ever written on psychology. The book was written by two famous psychologist by the names Carol and Elliot. Imagine if one of the prominent leader like a politician or a religious leader announces to the whole world that the world is ending on a certain day. All the people who receive the message especially the true followers of the reader take the message with a lot of seriousness where they consumes all their possession and they sell all their...
    1,444 Words | 4 Pages
  • Attitudes - 3041 Words
    An attitude can be defined as a “predisposition to act in a certain way towards some aspect of one’s environment, including other people” Mednick et al, (1975). Many theories have been put forward to predict attitude change, Argyle (1994). However, attitudes are extremely difficult to define and can’t be directly seen or measured, so behaviour is inferred from what people say or do. An attitude is the subjective evaluation of objects, people, events, ideas, activities and feelings. This...
    3,041 Words | 9 Pages
  • Management Function Behaviour Assignment
    ASSIGNMENTS PROGRAM:MBA 2yrs SEMESTER-I Subject Name : Management Functions & Behavior Batch : Permanent Enrollment Number (PEN) : Roll Number : Student Name : INSTRUCTIONS a) Students are required to submit all three assignment sets. ASSIGNMENT Assignment A Assignment B Assignment C DETAILS Five Subjective Questions Three Subjective Questions + Case Study 40 Objective Questions MARKS 10 10 10 b) c) d) e) Total weightage given to these assignments is 30%. OR 30 Marks All assignments are to...
    1,903 Words | 12 Pages
  • Behavior and Attitudes - 1405 Words
    Behavior and Attitudes Attitude Survey 1=SD 2=D 3=Neither 4=A 5=SA Engaging in exercise 3 times a wk promotes good health Eating a variety of foods each day, including five or more servings of fresh fruits and vegetables, contributes to wellness. It is essential that all citizens exercise their right to vote if government is to effectively reflect the will of the people. Attitude Survey 1=SD 2=D 3=Neither 4=A 5=SA Homelessness is a serious social problem that needs attention. Behavior...
    1,405 Words | 8 Pages
  • Post-Purchase Consumer Behavior
    Running head: CONSUMER BEHAVIOR POSTPURCHASE Consumer Behavior Post Purchase Amy Wofford MAN 105 March 6, 2015 Instructor Johnson Abstract The process of buying does not end after the purchase of a good or service. The consumer’s post purchase assessment is directly affected by the pre purchase assumptions, before purchase search, and the confidence about the product Consumer Behavior Post Purchase The process of buying does not end after the purchase of a good or service. The...
    604 Words | 2 Pages
  • The case of Mark Whiting - 2592 Words
     Organisational Behaviour ; Assignment 2- The case of Mark Whiting Mark's self fulfilling prophecy:- Mark's expectation about himself was to achieve the highest point of his career in his company, corporation presidency. He made this expectation at his own based upon his previous career success; - the years he had spent as manager in marketing and sales, - the last four years as vice-president of the company - the careful planning, - the long hours of work that had brought him to as...
    2,592 Words | 9 Pages
  • Communication Theories - 1767 Words
    Theories has different definitions to it such as, “Theory is a coherent group of tested general propositions, commonly regarded as correct, that can be used as principles of explanation and prediction for a class of phenomena”, as well as “Theory is a proposed explanation whose status is still conjectural and subject to experimentation, in contrast to well-established propositions that are regarded as reporting matters of actual facts”. (“theory”, n.d.). Theories in communication are...
    1,767 Words | 5 Pages
  • Organsational Behaviour - 2312 Words
    Cognitive dissonance Cognitive dissonance is the term used in modern psychology to describe the state of people when holding two or more conflicting cognitions (e.g., ideas, beliefs, values, emotional reactions) simultaneously. In a state of dissonance, people may sometimes feel surprise, dread, guilt, anger, or embarrassment.[1] The theory of cognitive dissonance in social psychology proposes that people have a motivational drive to reduce dissonance by altering existing cognitions, adding new...
    2,312 Words | 6 Pages
  • One of the Central Questions to Be Addressed in Social Psychology Is the Nature of the Relationship Between Attitudes and Behaviour. Research Has Demonstrated That This Relationship Is Far from Simple. Discuss.
    The term ‘attitude’ has been referred to as social psychology’s most indispensable concept, and the study of attitudes has dominated social psychology since the 1920s (Allport, 1935, p. 798; McGuire, 1986). In the early 19th century, attitude research was considered to be of such fundamental importance to social psychology that both were thought to be one and the same, and each to be the definition of the other (Watson, 1930; Hogg & Vaughan, 2011, p. 148). While social psychologists’ interest in...
    3,323 Words | 9 Pages
  • Behaviors vs. Attitudes - 1025 Words
    Behaviors vs. Attitudes In this corner, we have Attitudes - defined by dictionary.com as a “manner, disposition, feeling, position, etc., with regard to a person or thing; tendency or orientation, especially of the mind: a negative attitude; group attitudes.” The crowd is cheering for attitude. In the opposite corner, we have Behaviors - defined as an “action or reaction that occurs in response to an event or internal stimuli.” The cheers from the crowd lead me to believe they like...
    1,025 Words | 4 Pages
  • Chapter 6 Notes - 480 Words
    Attitude: How one feels about something in general (I have a positive attitude towards basketball). Balance theory: the theory that people try to maintain balance among their beliefs, cognitions, and sentiments. Cognitive dissonance theory: the theory that inconsistencies between a person’s thoughts, sentiments, and actions create an aversive emotional state (dissonance) that leads to efforts to restore consistency. Effort justification: the tendency to reduce dissonance by finding reasons...
    480 Words | 2 Pages
  • Theories Of Persuasion - 2779 Words
    Amanda Hammer Persuasive Theory Application COM4405.E1 April 13, 2015 The SMCR Model was created in 1949 by Shannon and Weaver and it is the most commonly used basic communications model. The basic sequence of the model is a source, a message, a channel, and a receiver. Communication starts with the source, or persuader, who encodes the message and then transmits it to the receiver. The message is what the source is trying to get the receiver to hear and understand. The message has to...
    2,779 Words | 7 Pages
  • Leon Festinger Research Paper
    Introduction and Approach: * Leon Festinger is not only a highly acclaimed genius and social psychologist; he is a passionate and ground breaking innovator in his field. * Born on May 8th, 1919 in New York City, Leon achieved his first baccalaureate degree in psychology from City College of New York in 1939. * Straight out of college Leon was a hit. Working with Max Hertzman on level of aspiration, the duo published a piece in the Journal of Experimental Psychology only a year after...
    1,981 Words | 4 Pages
  • Mba Notes Hrm - 1318 Words
    Cognitive dissonance is a discomfort caused by holding conflicting ideas simultaneously. The theory of cognitive dissonance proposes that people have a motivational drive to reduce dissonance. They do this by changing their attitudes, beliefs, and actions.[2] Dissonance is also reduced by justifying, blaming, and denying. The phrase was coined by Leon Festinger in his 1956 book When Prophecy Fails, which chronicled the followers of a UFO cult as reality clashed with their fervent beliefs.[3][4]...
    1,318 Words | 4 Pages
  • Attitude-Organisation Behaviour - 1121 Words
    Before coming to the main topic, we must be clear about the term “Attitude”, what the term means. ATTITUDE: “An attitude is a hypothetical construct that represents an individual's degree of like or dislike for an item”. Attitudes are generally positive or negative views of a person, place, thing, or event-- this is often referred to as the attitude object. People can also be conflicted or ambivalent toward an object, meaning that they simultaneously possess both positive and negative...
    1,121 Words | 4 Pages
  • Psychology attitudes - 1442 Words
     An attitude is a way of thinking or feeling which is typically reflected in a person’s behaviour. Attitudes are favourable or unfavourable way of viewing situations. They form an essential foundation for social thought; they are usually shaped by a person’s family environment, religion and education. Attitudes can help people adapt and adjust to new situations. A person’s attitude towards a situation can help to make decision making processes easier, faster and ensure the best possible outcome...
    1,442 Words | 4 Pages
  • Aronson 7ed, Chapter 2 Quiz
    Aronson 7ed, Chapter 2 Quiz |1. |One reason why it is important to examine cultural influences on social psychological processes is that | | |a. | | |establishing cultural differences helps to increase the internal validity of research. | | |...
    2,683 Words | 29 Pages
  • Review and Explanation of Effort Justification
    Brief review and explanation of Effort Justification Effort Justification is a theory of social psychology stemming from Festinger's (1957) theory of Cognitive Dissonance. Effort justification theory states that people have tendency to attribute a greater value to an outcome they had to put effort into obtaining. Cognitive Dissonance theory attempts to explain people's change of attitudes or beliefs when they face a dissonance between contradicting cognitions. Effort Justification theory is...
    789 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Experiment - 408 Words
    The Experiment Gloria Isham Central Texas College Twenty- six men are chosen to participate in the roles of guards and prisoners in a psychological study led by a Doctor Archaleta for which each participant is to receive $14,000 after two weeks. Travis has just lost his part time job and is a peace protester who wants to travel to India with his girlfriend. Barris is a 42-year-old who lives alone with a domineering mother, who has made him join the experiment to raise money for her hip...
    408 Words | 2 Pages
  • Communication Theories Paper - 1179 Words
    Communication theories paper Amanda Haring Com 310   Communication is defined as a process by which information is exchanged between individuals through a common system of symbols, signs or behavior. Communication helps us understand one another. ("Communication", 2011). Communication is broken down into theories. Three examples of these theories would be the social penetration theory, cognitive dissonance theory and the uncertainty reduction theory. The social penetration...
    1,179 Words | 3 Pages
  • Ap Psychology - 1164 Words
    |Wundt |“Father of Psychology”; introspection/ Structuralism | |Wertheimer |Gestalt psychology | |Titchner |Structuralism | |James...
    1,164 Words | 7 Pages
  • Case 4 MagRec Inc
    Kaitlin Tolley MGT 331 Case 4: MagRec Inc. 1. If I were the manager I would have pushed for a more moral, honest solution to the problem with Partco. The company should have owned up to the poor quality parts and offer to fix any damaged parts for customers. Even though it would have cost the company time and money, it was the right thing to do. I think that if the company were to explain the situation to Partco- with the one bad batch of parts, and assured them that it wouldn’t happen again...
    410 Words | 2 Pages
  • Killing us Softly documentary
    Zachary Gray Dr. Thompson Hybrid Persuasive on Persuasion 11 February 2015 Killing Us Softly 1. McLuhan’s idea of “medium is the message” means in order for something to be done you as the person who wants change must take action. 2. The media age has made a significant impact on female ideas. Young women are beginning to think that in order for them to be beautiful they must look like a supermodel on these commercials. 3. I can apply the persuader objective of repetition to the video. In...
    456 Words | 2 Pages
  • foundation of education - 7755 Words
    Subsumption Theory (David Ausubel) Ausubel's theory is concerned with how individuals learn large amounts of meaningful material from verbal/textual presentations in a school setting (in contrast to theories developed in the context of laboratory experiments). According to Ausubel, learning is based upon the kinds of superordinate, representational, and combinatorial processes that occur during the reception of information. A primary process in learning is subsumption in which new material is...
    7,755 Words | 0 Page
  • Case 4 Magrec, Inc
    Case 4: MAGREC, Inc. 1.) Place yourself in the role of the manager. What should you do now? After considering what happened, would you change any of your behaviors? If I was Pat: Even though Fred wants me to fire Dinah, I believe that if I was to fire her, Dinah would file a lawsuit for wrongful discharge. My values and morals should not be the deciding factor in determining if Dinah’s actions are grounds for dismal. As such, I would meet with Fred, and explain to him the result...
    1,117 Words | 3 Pages
  • psychology - 1166 Words
    Karen April 21, 2013 Psych. 1100 Psychology Analysis Paper #3 Cognitive Dissonance The Psychological story of decision making does not end however when the decision has been made. The act of making a decision can trigger a lot of other properties. According to psychologist Leon Festinger, whenever we choose to do something that conflicts with our prior beliefs, feelings, or values; a state of cognitive dissonance is created in us. (p. 244) A tension between what we think and what we...
    1,166 Words | 3 Pages
  • cognitions - 427 Words
     Cognitions are thoughts. Dissonance means clashing. The influential thoughts of cognitive dissonance states that contradicting or clashing thoughts cause discomfort. That is, we have a need for consistency in our thought, perceptions, and images of ourselves (Cooper, Mirablie, & Scher, 2005; Festinger, 1957). Inconsistency, then, can motivate people to make their thoughts or attitudes agree with their actions (Oskampe & Schultz, 2005). The theory of cognitive dissonance in social psychology...
    427 Words | 2 Pages
  • Marketing questions - 414 Words
    Week 6: The nature of consumer attitudes 1. Explain a person’s attitude towards visiting Disneyland in Hong Kong in terms of the tri-component model. 2. Explain how the product manager of a breakfast cereal might change consumer attitudes toward the company’s brand by: 1. changing beliefs about the brand, 2. changing beliefs about competing brands, 3. changing the relative evaluation of attitudes, and 4. adding an attribute. 3. The Kia Corporation of Korea is making a big push...
    414 Words | 2 Pages
  • Hello: American - 255 Words
    Annotated Bibliography Banerjee, S. C., Hay, J. L., & Greene, K. (2013). Cognitive Rationalizations for Tanning-Bed Use: A This is a study done to examine the cognitive rationalization amongst undergraduate students that either use tanning beds or used to use tanning beds. Despite the rising skin cancer rates and the direct correlation between indoor tanning and melanoma, tanning beds are still a popular cosmetic tool amongst young adults. Cognitive dissonance can assist in explaining the...
    255 Words | 1 Page
  • Everybody Loves Raymond - 1346 Words
    WHY DOES EVERYBODY LOVE RAYMOND? Why doesn't everyone hate Raymond? He's a mama's boy, lazy, and not very attractive. One would wonder why anybody in their right mind would give a guy like this his own television series. Using a couple of Kenneth Burke's theories, cause-to-effect reasoning, and cognitive dissonance theory, I will find out just why people can't get enough of the show Everybody Loves Raymond. Using Kenneth Burke's approach to language use, we find that the show makes a...
    1,346 Words | 4 Pages
  • Theories of Communication - 706 Words
    Theories of communication My understanding of Argyles communication cycle is an idea occurs, and then a message is sent through verbal or non-verbal communication to another person. The message is then received and decoded; then an idea occurs meaning the cycle is repeated forming a conversation. For effective communication to occur the cycle needs to be repeated continuously with no interruptions- also known as barriers. An example of a barrier in the cycle is when the message is sent, if the...
    706 Words | 2 Pages
  • “Does Behavior Always Follow from Attitudes? Why or Why Not? Discuss the Factors That Affect Whether Behavioral Follows from Attitude and Are It Different in the Asian Context."
    In the world that we live in today, every individual is very unique. Their life style, hobbies, interests, likes and dislikes and many other characteristics, the way they portrait it is very differently, even each and everyone in a family will also have different characters or personality. The behavior of a person is hard to be predict if we do not understand them. So what we need to do to understand more about a person’s behavior is to study their thoughts. By understanding it, we may know...
    2,749 Words | 8 Pages
  • Consumer Behaviour - 1326 Words
    CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR ‘Evaluate the use of multi-attribute models to predict consumer behaviour The multi-attribute models are theories which use the consumer’s attitudes to predict their behaviour toward a product. An attitude it’s to have a positive or negative reaction facing a product. Many models were born during the last century. But do they have a real impact on the consumer behaviour? Are they really useful to predict it? We try to ask to these questions in studying six of these...
    1,326 Words | 4 Pages
  • Sarah's Choice - 791 Words
     Sarah’s Choice This is the story of Sarah. Sarah is a girl who doesn’t get out much. Her parents are strict by giving her a curfew and she has an attitude about them being that way. She thinks that as a sophomore, she should have the right to spend more time out with friends. She has never really thought that she had freedom and this gives her an attitude about how her parents are and this contributes to her wanting to be free. According to Simona Rich, negative attitudes...
    791 Words | 3 Pages
  • UnSpun - 1691 Words
    Phylicia Hancle AP English unSpun Finding Facts in a World of Disinformtion A man with a conviction is a hard man to change. Tell him you disagree and he turns away. Show him facts or figures and he questions you sources. Appeal to logic and he fails to see your point. -Leon Festinger, et al., When Prophecy Fails (1956) Have you ever wondered why other people are so unreasonable and hard to convince? Why is it that they disregard hard facts that prove you’re right and they’re...
    1,691 Words | 5 Pages
  • Rationalism of Failure - 694 Words
    Rationalization of Failure Aesop's short story "The Fox and the Grapes" tells of a fox failing to find a way to reach some grapes hanging high up on a vine. The story deals with the rationalization of the failure to attain a desired end. Rather than accept a personal failure by acknowledging our shortcomings or by unemotionally evaluating the circumstances that surrounded the failure, we rationalize and come up with an immediate excuse. We need to convince ourselves and everybody else who...
    694 Words | 2 Pages
  • Psychological Factors Affecting Consumers’ Purchasing-Decisions of Eco-Labelled Products
    Table of Contents 1. Introduction!....................................................................................................................................!2! 2. Literature review and conceptual framework!..........................................................................!3! . 2.1 Thøgersen (2000) – Psychological determinants of paying attention to eco-labels in purchase...
    5,131 Words | 20 Pages
  • Interpersonal Communication - 1312 Words
    Vocabulary Terms Communicative competence- The ability to communicate in a personally effective and socially appropriate manner. Message competence- The ability to make message choices that others can comprehend as well as to respond to the message choice of others. Intrapersonal comm.- Communication that a person has with him or herself. This is often regarded as "self communication" Interpersonal comm.- Communication between two people, generally on face-to face interaction. Relational...
    1,312 Words | 5 Pages
  • Kjnfibevijbrevefbvbe Fvbevkijbejkvbekijbv - 1140 Words
    The following is a typical statement made by a young person who has given up sport and leads an unhealthy lifestyle: 'I think sport is boring. I am no good at it, I don't enjoy it and I can think of better things to do on a Saturday afternoon.’ Using attribution and attitudinal theories, evaluate critically the reasons why this young person does not participate in sport. How might you persuade this young person to once again take up sport? In regards to attribution, it is said that this...
    1,140 Words | 3 Pages
  • Counterfactual Thinking and Experiences of Regret
    Counterfactual thinking and experiences of regret Introduction Counterfactual thinking is the cognitive process in which individuals can simulate alternative realities, to think about how things could have turned out differently, with statements such as ‘what if’ and ‘if only’. Counterfactuals can be either upward, in which alternative realities are improved, or downward, in which alternative realities are worsened. Reflecting on previous outcomes can make individuals experience regret and...
    1,743 Words | 5 Pages
  • Sociology Exam - 1939 Words
    2. You ask your academic advisor what to major in, as you can’t seem to decide. She suggests psychology; however, it is important to remember that this answer likely reflects her: Correct answer: Values. (Page 9) Social psychologists’ values penetrate their work in obvious ways, such as their choice of research topics and the types of people who are attracted to various fields of study. 3. When asked who you think will win the next presidential election, you reply that you do not know....
    1,939 Words | 6 Pages
  • Social Psychology: Attitudes and Persuasion
    Social Psychology: Attitudes and Persuasion Someones attitude is their perception of objects of thought, these are things such as social issues, products, and the people around them(1). There are three parts to your attitude, the cognitive, affective, and behavioral parts (1). Your cognitive componet is your beliefs about certian objects(1). The affective part is your emotional feelings that are caused be the objects, and the behavioral part is the way you act toward that object (1). It is...
    639 Words | 2 Pages
  • O.B Case Studies - 9882 Words
    |VALUES, ATTITUDES, AND JOB SATISFACTION | LEARNING OBJECTIVES After studying this chapter, students should be able to: 1. Contrast terminal and instrumental values 2. List the dominant values in today’s workforce 3. Identify the five value dimensions of national culture 4. Contrast the three components of an attitude 5. Summarize the relationship between attitudes...
    9,882 Words | 48 Pages
  • Ob Testplan Attitudes - 5920 Words
    Chapter 3 Values, Attitudes, and Job Satisfaction MULTIPLE CHOICE Values 1. ____ represent basic convictions that “a specific mode of conduct or end state of existence is personally or socially preferable to an opposite mode of conduct.” a. Values b. Attitudes c. Convictions d. Preferences (a; Moderate; p. 63) 2. The content attribute states a value is: a. complete. b. important. c. a basic conviction. d. related to behavior....
    5,920 Words | 30 Pages
  • Life without Ed: Analysis
    Carly Kursman Social Psychology Rob Wahl October 30, 2007 “From the outside looking in, You can’t understand it. From the inside looking out, You can’t explain it.” (Schaefer, 2004: xxviii) “Life without Ed: How one woman Declared Independence from Her Eating Disorder and How you can too,” shows the courage of a young woman who finally leaves behind her biggest crutch; E.D., her eating disorder. For more than 20 years, Jenni Schaefer was controlled and abused by a man...
    2,055 Words | 6 Pages
  • Individual Behaviour - 953 Words
    ORGANISATIONAL BEHAVIOUR MSC 42102 Individual Processes Attitude and Values Organizational Behavior Submitted To : Submitted By : Dr. Pramod Pathak Ajit Vinod Kujur Manwendra Prakash Anshul Rawat Prateek Purty Prateeksha Maurya Individual Processes Individual behavior is how we as individuals behave ourselves. This behavior is subject to many personal traits as well as habits, values, perceptions, and other qualities and features. People make assumptions about...
    953 Words | 6 Pages
  • Attribution Error - 12964 Words
    Copyright © The British Psychological Society Reproduction in any form (including the internet) is prohibited without prior permission from the Society 155 Legal and Criminological Psychology (2006), 11, 155–177 q 2006 The British Psychological Society The British Psychological Society www.bpsjournals.co.uk Invited article A fundamental attribution error? Rethinking cognitive distortions† Shadd Maruna1* and Ruth E. Mann2 1 2 Queen’s University Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK...
    12,964 Words | 39 Pages
  • Matrix Concept - 628 Words
    Matrix Concept Social Psychology Ganouse Capricien Strayer University Social Psychology Concept | Definition | Application to SocietyProvide Example | Application to Criminal JusticeProvide Example | Application to the IndividualProvide Example | Survey Research | Structured sets of questions or statements given to a group of people to measure their attitudes, beliefs, values, or behavioral tendencies. | Survey research applies to society when we need to gather data or...
    628 Words | 2 Pages
  • Human Communication Theory - 2924 Words
    Comm Theory Review Questions Elaboration Likelihood Model Owner: Richard Petty & John Cacioppo 1. Identify and explain the two mental routes to attitude change. Are these routes mutually exclusive? What separates the twin poles on the cognitive continuum? Central Route: Message elaboration; the path of cognitive processing that involves scrutiny of message content. Peripheral Route: No message elaboration; a mental shortcut process that accepts or rejects a message based on...
    2,924 Words | 9 Pages
  • Correlation between Attitude and Behavior
    Does Behavior always follow from Attitudes? We have maintained that attitude affects behavior. Early research on attitudes assumed that they were causally related to behavior; that is, the attitude that people hold determines what they do. Common sense, too, suggests a relationship. Isn’t it logical that people watch television programs that they say they like or that employees try to avoid assignments they find distasteful. However, in the late 1960s, this assumed relationships between...
    2,175 Words | 7 Pages
  • Consumer's Post Purchase Evaluation
    1. Explain the consumer's post purchase evaluation process. After using a product or service the consumer compares the level of performance with expectations. Satisfaction occurs when the consumer’s expectations are either met or exceeded, while dissatisfaction results when performance is below expectations. Another possible outcome of purchase is cognitive dissonance which refers to a feeling of psychological tension or post-purchase doubt a consumer may experience after making a difficult...
    482 Words | 2 Pages
  • wqqeq - 1096 Words
    Attitude Formation / Change: Functional Approach to Change The functional approach to changing attitudes says that there are four classifications of attitudes. They are the utilitarian function, the ego defensive function, the value-expressive function, and the knowledge function. The utilitarian function is when an attitude is held due to the brand’s utility. A way to change this attitude is to show the utility or purpose of the brand that they might not have considered. The next is the...
    1,096 Words | 4 Pages
  • Why Do People Buy Counterfeit Merchandise
    Why do people buy counterfeit products? 1 Running head: Why do people buy counterfeit products? Why do people buy counterfeit products? Monica Rodriguez American Intercontinental University Dr. Yamil Guevara Why do people buy counterfeit products? 2 ABSTRACT The elaboration and commercialization of counterfeit products is an issue that has been growing prominently within the last 20 years. There is no place in...
    3,741 Words | 15 Pages
  • Mistakes Were Made - 548 Words
    Many of us can relate to feeling regularly frustrated, thinking, “Why is it so hard for us to admit our mistakes?” Carol Tavris and Elliot Aronson’s book, Mistakes Were Made (But Not by Me), focuses on why people justify bad decisions, beliefs, and actions. It also offers suggestions about how we might be able to challenge ourselves to honestly reflect on our choices and take responsibility for our actions. In the beginning of the book, the authors introduce the theory of cognitive dissonance...
    548 Words | 2 Pages
  • Irrational Behavior - 571 Words
    An irrational behavior is defined as a behavior with no clear meanings and reason. It does not help you to progress towards your objective. In fact, there is a bunch of things we know we should take clear of but we do them anyway and vice versa. This is a reason why people are more attracted to products during the sales. In this case, irrational behavior leads people to cognitive dissonance because at some level, everybody has some reasons to do the “wrong” action. People are more attracted...
    571 Words | 2 Pages
  • Post Purchase Evaluation Process
    Post purchase Evaluation Process Carlie Higdon MAN105 March 9, 2013 Professor Dana Adams Consumer post purchase evaluation is generally affected by pre purchase expectations, The consumer usually does some sort of research to compare prices and such before making a big purchase, a house or a car for example. And the evaluation is whether they are happy or not with what they bought....
    298 Words | 1 Page
  • Attitudes & Theories of Attitudes - 404 Words
    ATTITUDES & THEORIES OF ATTITUDES Attitudes are evaluative statements or judgments, either favorable or unfavorable concerning objective, people or events. They reflect how one feels about something e.g. if is said, “I like my job”, I am expressing my attitude about work. Attitudes are not the same as values, but the two are interrelated. There are three components of an attitude: Cogn ition, affect, and Behavior. Cognitive Component of an attitude The opinion or belief segment of...
    404 Words | 2 Pages
  • Case 5 – Magrec, Inc.
    Case 5 – Magrec, Inc. 1. I would let a day pass and then request another meeting with Dinah indicating a sincere desire to work through the matter and the need to come to an understanding and agreement of how to work together and with the team moving forward. At that meeting, I would start off and thank Dinah for bringing the Partco matter to my attention. I would communicate with Dinah that I respect her strong feelings and beliefs behind her actions regarding the Partco matter but...
    821 Words | 3 Pages
  • Attitude Persuasion - 1581 Words
    Introduction: The word attitude is an expression of favor or disfavor toward a person, place, thing, or event. Prominent psychologist Gordon Allport (1935) once described attitude “the most distinctive and indispensable concept in contemporary psychology”. The words attitude and persuasion are often found together, as in the phrase persuasion and attitude change. Persuasion is an attempt to change people's attitudes. For example, advertisers try to persuade potential customers to buy a...
    1,581 Words | 5 Pages
  • Big 5 Festinger and Hetzenburg
    Self-fulfilling prophecy is a prediction that directly or indirectly causes it to become true, due to positive feedback between belief and behavior. In other words, a positive or negative prophecy, strongly held belief or delusion may sufficiently influence people so that their reactions ultimately fulfill the once-false prophecy. As per Self-fulfilling prophecy the negative fear, anxiety about a possible negative event in the future may increase the likelihood of the event actually happening....
    1,727 Words | 5 Pages

All Cognitive dissonance Essays