Coast Essays & Research Papers

Best Coast Essays

  • Migrants to the Coast - 707 Words
    Migrants to the Coasts Overview and Discussion There are three goals Eder presents in his fieldwork. They were to ; (1) “understand fishing and the fishing peoples”(Eder 5), how they lived and how their resources affected their day to day lives,(2) The Palawan’s culture had become diverse and he thought it was important he showed appreciation for what it had become. (3) Last, but not least, he wanted to be more involved with research issues such as “environmental crisis, economic difficulty,...
    707 Words | 2 Pages
  • Coast Essay - 585 Words
    Coasts are controlled by nature but managed by humans. Coasts are controlled by nature but managed by humans. Erosion and built up are the natural processes involved in controlling the coast. Due to human activities the natural processes are interrupted because humans have specific desires to use the coast in a certain way and try to manage it. Erosion occurs depending on the strength of the rock and wave. Waves carry sand, rocks, shells, seaweed and other materials on and off the beach. The...
    585 Words | 2 Pages
  • crowded coasts - 554 Words
    Describe how physical and economic factors may have made one area you have studied in crowded coast (10 marks) Coasts become crowded when more and more people want to move there. This means the coast must a number of different pull factors which attracts people to the area for different reasons. Firstly, the climate of an area is a significant factor which can cause it to become crowded. Coasts with a higher climate means that more people want to migrate their in search of warmer climates in...
    554 Words | 2 Pages
  • Coasts and Their Management - 2597 Words
    Fieldwork supports the geography curriculum by promoting geographical knowledge and understanding (Job et al 1999). In helping to bridge the divide between the classroom and the real world (Fuller 2006), and it helps to reinforce students’ understanding of geographical terminology and processes (Job et al1999). Victoria Stuckey Bellaire High School SL Human Geography Internal Assessment Fieldwork Fieldwork supports the geography curriculum by promoting geographical knowledge and...
    2,597 Words | 8 Pages
  • All Coast Essays

  • Coast and Life - 362 Words
    MAIN MESSAGE The poem “GABU” by Carlos Angeles talks about life and death. The speaker talks about how restless it is to be alive. This is because in life there is so many problems one must face to achieve one’s goals. In addition to this, life is not consistent. One cannot always be at the top or at the bottom. There will always be a point in time when one either falls or rises from their position. Even with all these inconsistencies of life, people still carry on living. But it is also...
    362 Words | 2 Pages
  • Camaya Coast Tourism Activities
    Name: Subject: CAMAYA COAST BEACH RESORT 1. Gather Information Developers: Earth & Shore Leisure Key Personnel: Manuel Carlos Ilagan Jr. -President Luis Carmel H. Valenzuela -Vice President Genaro A. Reyes Jr. -VP Engineering Dept. Mark Kalalo Morales -Director and Technical ...
    1,699 Words | 7 Pages
  • Saving Georgia's Coast - 555 Words
    Saving Georgia’s Coast SCI/ 275 In the state of Georgia, the belief is such that costal preservation is of the upmost importance, that it should be practiced regionally, nationally and even globally. Since there are many ecosystems that depend on the coastal regions that we have recently revealed, many more oceanic studies of this are still in the early stages compared to other environmental findings in past history. There have been many threats by developers and legislators for...
    555 Words | 2 Pages
  • Geography Essay on Crowded Coasts
    Florida is located on the on south east sea bound of the United States of America. It is a peninsula and is a popular destination from tourists from all over the world as well as visitors from other parts of the USA. There are many factors that make Florida a magnet for visitors. . The coast is the most popular area of Florida as it allows access to Florida’s many beaches, 75% of people in Florida live along the coast. Firstly Florida is very close to the Caribbean islands and it enjoys a very...
    605 Words | 2 Pages
  • Case Study: Coastal Erosion: Holderness Coast
    Case Study: Coastal Erosion: Holderness Location | * Holderness is an area of the East Riding of Yorkshire, on the east coast of England. * Sub-cell that stretches from Flanborough Head to Spurn Head. | Erosion | * Fastest eroding coastline in the UK. * Rapidly retreating coastline. * At Flanborough Head, the average erosion is greater than 10cm a year. * By Mappleton, the average erosion is greater than 200cm a year. * At Spurn Head, 500000 tonnes of sand is moved by the sea...
    449 Words | 2 Pages
  • Coastal Processes at East Coast Park Singapore
    An Investigation Into Coastal Processes At East Coast Park Introduction What is the aim ? To investigate the processes that shape the coastline of the beach at East Coast Park , Singapore. What is the hypothesis ? The hypothesis for this study was that “natural processes are the only processes...
    2,949 Words | 87 Pages
  • Examine the Environmental Impacts of Development on the Coast and the Conflict It Causes
    Examine the environmental impacts of development on the coast and the conflict it causes (10). (1)VISUAL POLLUTION – big ugly container ports eg Dibden – Southampton. The coast is traditionally a very attractive place that is why there has been a process of: COASTALISATION - increasing population density along the coastlines, as people seek a better quality of life outside of cities and inland areas which leads to: (2)SEWAGE – more pressure of housing and growth of coastal resorts...
    324 Words | 2 Pages
  • Coastal Management Rbsc Environment Research Beach Coast
    Maroubra surf lifesaving club How effective are the coastal management strategies used at present in your local beach area? The coastal management strategies are not very effective as gathered from the surveys. On average, the participating surveyees gave the strategies a 4 out of a possible 5. This data were gathered from visitors/neighbourhoods who visit on average frequently. The main concern that would need conventional changes are council clean ups for rubbish track paths, washrooms...
    7,614 Words | 30 Pages
  • Referring to a Stretch of Coast You Have Studied, Explain How and Why Some Coasts Are Under Threat from Economic Development
    Referring to a stretch of coast you have studied, explain how and why some coasts are under threat from economic development (10 Marks) Some coasts such as Southampton could be considered under threat from economic development due to the fact they are extremely reliant on nearby industries as the area of Southampton is known to have advantages for industry as it is sheltered from storms in the English channel, deep water for large ships and lots of flat land for development. However, there is...
    451 Words | 2 Pages
  • Describe the physical and economic factors that may have made Bournemouth a crowded coast.
    Bournemouth is Dorset's largest city. It has grown in size since the early 1800's to a population about 150,000 today. There are various reasons why Bournemouth is desirable and has attracted so many people. Bournemouth seems to have a certain charm that other British characteristics that many other seaside towns fail to offer. Bournemouth is situated on a Jurassic world heritage coastline meaning that it offers a beauty that other coastlines lack and people are aware of its beauty. Also,...
    549 Words | 2 Pages
  • Soft Engineering Works In Harmony With The Natural Environment And Is Effective In Protecting The Coast
    Soft engineering works in harmony with the natural environment and is effective in protecting the coast. To what extent do you agree with this view? I agree with this view to a great extent. Soft engineering methods are natural ways of dealing with erosion, however, every method comes with disadvantages. One way in which soft engineering working well with the natural environment and is also effective, is beach nourishment. This is where materials such as sand and shingle are moved from the...
    646 Words | 2 Pages
  • Coastline Erosion - 897 Words
    Coastal Erosion Coastal erosion is a naturally occurring phenomenon resulting from the continuous action of wind and water. Both act to remove small pieces of land from one location and deposit them elsewhere. Weather events such as hurricanes and nor’easters speed the erosion process, as do tidal waves. Currently, rising sea levels resulting from melting polar ice decrease available land as well. While erosion has always been a factor of coastal living, increasing populations along the...
    897 Words | 3 Pages
  • Sba outline 1 - 574 Words
    Marks allotted 2. Table of Contents 3. Aim of Study 5. Method of Data Collection 5. Location of Study Are 10. Presentation of Findings 3. Conclusion 2. Bibliography Appendix SBA Outline Aim of Study What do you intend to do. Identify describe and Investigate (no more than two sentences) Method of Data Collection When did you visit the Study Areas Where? How? Personal Observation, Draw Maps and Diagrams Take Snap Shots, Collect Samples. Location of Study Area 1 map of Jamaica Locate...
    574 Words | 3 Pages
  • Coral Reefs Salt Marshes Mangroves
    Salt Marshes,Mangroves,and Coral Reefs Salt Marshes • Salt marshes are found along low lying coastlines where boggy ground is flooded by sea water either daily or less frequently. • Many UK salt marshes have been reclaimed for farm land, but those that remain provide valuable habitats where salt-tolerant plants grow and birds nest. Salt marshes also pay a vital role for coastal protection, they contain creeks which allow tidal waters to flow both in and out which reduces the wave...
    348 Words | 2 Pages
  • Coastal Management Byron Bay
    Coastal Management Byron Bay, Northern NSW Location * An oceanside town in the northern beaches region of New South Wales (28°38’35.04”S, 153°36’54.47”) Major Issues and Geographical Processes/Effects * Erosion and rising sea levels present themselves as the most major issues; * Particularly on the strip of coast known as Belongil Beach * Erosion along Belongil has created major obstacles for the construction of new buildings, and the preservation of...
    773 Words | 3 Pages
  • Geography School Based Assesment
    What Are The Erosional And Depositional Features Located at Botany Bay and by Hectors River Jamaica Caused by Wave Action? School: Wolmer’s Boys’ School Candidate Name:Wade Williams Territory: Jamaica Year: 2013 Table of Contents Page Aim of the study Methodology Location of Study Area...
    992 Words | 5 Pages
  • fancy - 467 Words
    Ngunguru Ngunguru is a coastal community in Northland, New Zealand. Whangarei is twenty six kilometres to the south west. The Ngunguru River flows between the main community and a long sandspit into Ngunguru Bay. The population in Ngunguru is one thousand and twenty five this census was taken in 2006.The name Ngunguru means rumbling tides in Maori. Why is Ngunguru the best place to live, well I will tell you why Ngunguru is the best place to live. Its not just the beach the water buts its also...
    467 Words | 2 Pages
  • Coastal Erosion Prevention - 1190 Words
    Coastline Erosion Shoreline depletion by erosion is a natural process that occurs due to a variety of reasons. Shores can be devastated due to short-term events such as storms, wave action, or tides and winds. Shorelines can also be affected by large scale events such as glacier or orogeny cycles that alter sea levels. Tectonic movements also cause coastal land to be depleted or increased. These processes are natural, and the rise and fall of coastlines is just another part of nature, but...
    1,190 Words | 4 Pages
  • Maritime Assignments - 8630 Words
    table of contents 1. Introduction 1 1.1 Current situation of the Maharashtra State Coastal Area 1 1.1.1 Wave climate 1 1.1.2 Geology and geomorphology 1 1.1.3 Littoral dynamics. Erosion problems 1 1.1.4 Water quality 1 1.1.5 Flora and fauna; wetlands, dunes and protected areas 1 1.1.6 Social uses of the coastal area; pressures 1 2. Technical approach and methodology 2 2.1 Part I Project Management 3 2.2 Part II: Support for Effective Institutions 4 2.2.1...
    8,630 Words | 29 Pages
  • Coastal Management - 528 Words
    As the coastal management expert of Southerland Shire I have come up with the most appropriate way to manage this problem. Storm surges are effects of severe storm systems due to a rise in sea level, if a storm surge and a tide meet when reaching the coast line severe damage can occur; resulting in extreme flooding in coastal areas, leading to damaging buildings surrounding the coastline. To prevent this problem and minimize storm surges having such a large impact and causing severe damage to...
    528 Words | 2 Pages
  • Cxc Geo Sba - 2593 Words
    3/30/2011 JAMAICA COLLEGE GEOGRAPHY SBA Coastal Morphology | Colin Campbell Table of Content 1. Aim of study . 2. Location of study .. 3. Method of data collection .. 4. Presentation, Analysis and Discussion of data . 5. Observation of findings .. 6. Conclusion . 7. Bibliography I Aim of Study 1. To study the effects of constructive and destructive wave processes on coastal landforms development 2. To determine the influence of the local rock...
    2,593 Words | 12 Pages
  • Coastal Erosion: Causes and Solutions
    Levardis Smith Katherine Luce LR10 – Intro to Library Research 16 November 2010 Coastal Erosion: Causes and Solutions More than half the world’s population lives in coastal regions, and many people visit the coast frequently. Most come for seaside recreation, but some also wonder about the origins of coastal scenery. From the United States to Australia to the UK and back, our coastlines are disappearing and we have been trying to stop it. Up and down the United States coastline,...
    1,868 Words | 5 Pages
  • The Seaside - 1544 Words
    THE SEASIDE How important were the natural features of the sea and sand in creating and maintaining the popularity of the seaside resorts? Whilst sitting on a huge boulder that was on the beach, looking out at the sea with the sunrise glistening off of it, the crest of the waves turning white and finally crashing on to the beach and fizzling out where we sat, I turned to my then girlfriend and said “I want to live here, by the sea”. Within two months we had moved, lock stock and barrel and...
    1,544 Words | 4 Pages
  • Different Coastal Land Forms
    The Coastal Environment Essay NAME: _________________________________________________________________ Task: • Answer ONE of the following questions in a geographical essay. • Use labelled diagrams and/or sketches where appropriate in your responses; diagrams must be hand drawn and discussed in your response. 1. “Different coastal landforms are a result of different factors.” Discuss with reference to different types of coastal landforms and the factors which influence...
    445 Words | 3 Pages
  • Salt Marsh Essay - 855 Words
    Katie Paez Marine Science Salt Marsh Essay Salt marshes play vital roles in coastal areas, such as Westhampton, Southampton, Hampton Bays, and many other locations. Let’s look at the global effects of salt marshes. A study from September of this year published in UVAToday shows that the carbon stored in salt marshes may help in slowing global climate change. Carbon dioxide is the predominant so-called “greenhouse gas” that acts as sort of an atmospheric blanket, trapping the Earth’s heat....
    855 Words | 3 Pages
  • Human Impact on the Coastal Landscape
    Perry Newton Student # 000-00 1818 Geog 222 Section (1) Mrs Sandra Burrows Date: November 4, 2008 The Human Impact on Coastal Landscape The relationship between humans and their environment is a topic that engenders much debate. Humans are intellectual. They can think, reason, feel and make deductions or hypothesis and seek to solve or prove their deductions or theories. The environment on the other hand is inanimate and exists by means of natural laws and principles that govern...
    3,592 Words | 10 Pages
  • Costal Features Along Maracas Bay
    Tides often determine the range over which sediment is deposited or eroded. Areas with high tidal ranges allow waves to reach farther up the shore, and areas with lower tidal ranges produce deprossosition at a smaller elevation interval. The tidal range is influenced by the size and shape of the coastline. Tides do not typically cause erosion by themselves; however, tidal bores can erode as the waves surge up river estuaries from the ocean.[3] Waves erode coastline as they break on shore...
    286 Words | 1 Page
  • With reference to located examples, examine ways in which coastal areas can a valuable resource.
    With reference to located examples, examine ways in which coastal areas can a valuable resource. Coastal areas attract a wide range of industry and businesses and they also offer plenty of opportunities for recreational activities. As a result coastal areas become a valuable resource, and they attract lots of businesses and people. The Solent located near to the city of Southampton, is a multi-use area and is a valuable coastal resource due to its industry and recreational actives. The Port of...
    366 Words | 1 Page
  • Erosion - 5187 Words
    Coastal Erosion The beaches of North Carolina's coastline face an ongoing threat: coastal erosion. Though mostly gradual and relatively unnoticeable over the course of a year or two, the rising sea level combined with a season of storms or hurricanes can cause anywhere from a few feet to hundreds of feet of this delicate shoreline being stripped away. Solutions are constantly being studied and discussed, but often, the solution to erosion can be just as damaging as erosion itself. While...
    5,187 Words | 13 Pages
  • Estuary Phy - 1947 Words
    Abstract The study was carried out o the 6th of August at the Mpenjati estuary and was done using different data collecting methods and analysis methods. The purpose of study was to determine the profile of the Mpenjati estuary and the flow of the estuary, these are shown by graphs that are found in the results section. Introduction An estuary is a partially enclosed body of water along the coast line where freshwater from rivers meet and mix with ocean. Estuaries are transition areas from...
    1,947 Words | 6 Pages
  • British Petroleum Oil Spill Disaster
    The Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill (aka BP Oil Spill) was one of the worst oil disasters in history. How much damage was done? How is BP making up for it? This is what we discovered: In the BP Oil Spill, more than 200 million gallons of crude oil was pumped into the Gulf of Mexico for a total of 87 days, making it the biggest oil spill in U.S. history. 16,000 total miles of coastline have been affected, including the coasts of Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida. Even though...
    308 Words | 1 Page
  • Pressure Equalization Modules - 2277 Words
    International Coastal Symposium ICS2007 Gold Coast Australia Coastal protection based on Pressure Equalization Modules (PEM) P.Jakobsen† and †SIC Skagen Innovation Center Skagen 9990 Denmark sic@shore.dk C.Brøgger‡ ‡ SIC Skagen Innovation Center Skagen 9990 Denmark sic@shore.dk ABSTRACT JAKOBSEN,P and BRØGGER,C., 2007. Coastal protection based on Pressure Equalization Modules (PEM) . Journal of Coastal Research, SI 50 (Proceedings of the 9th International Coastal Symposium),...
    2,277 Words | 12 Pages
  • Factors Affecting the Rate of Coastal Erosion
    Factors affecting the rate of coastal erosion Rock types - Soft rocks like clay or mud, erode faster than hard rocks like granite. This is because hard rocks are more resistant to erosion. This means that the hard rock is left sticking out into the sea as a headland. The headland is now vulnerable to the force of destructive waves but shelters the bays close by from further erosion. Wave type - Destructive waves cause more erosion than constructive waves. This is because backwash is more...
    373 Words | 1 Page
  • death by scrabble - 940 Words
    In Crossing the Bar, by Alfred Lord Tennyson, the poem was written as elegy of dying person, the speaker compare transition of impending death and crossing the sand bar. The image of the Sea is used to represent the “barrier” between life and death. It was described as hard as saying good bye to love ones, eagerly hoping those who will be left behind will not sob or cry. The speaker is in the stage where he is ready to face death also imagining after life experience on what will it turn out...
    940 Words | 3 Pages
  • Human Impact at Hastings Point
     1.0 Introduction Last term the Biology and Geography class went to Hastings Point, New South Wales to visit three ecosystems found in the area, such as- mangroves, sand dunes and rocky shores. Hasting Points is the smallest coastal settlement of Tweed Shire. The hamlet is nestled between the ocean on its east and a delicate estuary on its west. This report will focus on the unique coastal habitats of Hasting Points and the various issues that challenge the sustainability of mangroves...
    1,070 Words | 4 Pages
  • Reaction Paper - 615 Words
    International Coastal Clean-up Reaction Paper Ocean Conservancy's International Coastal Cleanup is the world's largest volunteer effort for ocean's health. Each year, thousands of volunteers from around the globe participate, clearing tons of trash from coastlines, rivers and lakes and recording every piece of trash collected. On a beautiful, hot, sunny and a little bit rainy Saturday, we participated in the Annual International Coastal Cleanup at Freedom Island near the Manila-Cavite...
    615 Words | 2 Pages
  • Beaches vs Mountains - 466 Words
    BEACH VS. MOUNTAINS 1 Beach vs. Mountains CRAIG MAY ENG 121 English Composition I Lindsay Harrel 25 OCT 2012 Beach vs. Mountains 2 We are always looking forward to their vacation period. There are many options where to choose in the State of California. I think that the two most common places people choose for taking a vacation are the beaches and the mountains. Both places offer a variety of activities and a quiet place to relax. The beach has items...
    466 Words | 2 Pages
  • a beach resort - 316 Words
    Good morning, ladies and gentlemen. I am Jocelyn Chang, PR of the Paradise Beach Resort. Welcome to this new beach resort. The Paradise Beach Resort is a golf and beach resort which is a one-hour drive from Kuching. The resort is situated along a beautiful coastline of unspoilt sandy beach fringed by swaying palm trees and crystal-clear water. The hotel lobby is exquisitely designed. The ambience gives visitors a feeling of grandeur and serenity at the same time. There are 120 rooms in our...
    316 Words | 1 Page
  • Ap environmental science periodical review
    Barbaro, Giuseppe. "Management and Protection of Coastal Area, the Importance of Coastal Processes during the Planning Phase." Www.la-press.com. Libertas Academica Freedom to Research, 11 Sept. 2013. Web. 2 Oct. 2013. . Emily Daugherty October 2, 2013 MANAGEMENT AND PROTECTION OF COASTAL AREA, THE IMPORTANCE OF COASTAL PROCESSES DURING THE PLANNING PHASE The scientist, Giuseppe Barbaro, researched how...
    414 Words | 2 Pages
  • Marine Debris - 3414 Words
    Abstract The ubiquitous nature of marine debris is a growing concern worldwide. Continued monitoring of established sites will only lead to a deeper understanding of the complex problem. Beach surveys have been performed at Charlesworth Bay since July 2011. With over 3 years of beach survey data we are able to examine the temporal importance in estimating daily accumulation rates. We continue to identify the types and sources of debris. With an expanding data set experts are able to...
    3,414 Words | 12 Pages
  • Museum Visit Paper – Ante Meridian by Frederick Waug
    Museum Visit Paper – Ante Meridian by Frederick Waugh ART 101 My family and I recently visited the Orlando Museum of Art in Orlando, Florida. The museum enjoys a seemingly eclectic collection of artifacts, sculptures, photographs, and paintings. While perusing the gallery I was fascinated by one painting in particular. The piece was called “Ante Meridian”, oil on board, c.a. 1935 by Frederick Judd Waugh (American 1861-1940). This representational painting was of a presumably north...
    1,550 Words | 4 Pages
  • Wind and Beach - 666 Words
    Two methods used : beach fabric anaylysis and measuring Cliff height. Beach fabric analysis and profile: Equipment used: Quadrat, Written recording sheets, Measuring tape , Tennis balls, Stopwatch, Ranging poles, Clinometer ( Homemade ), Compass, Anomemeter. Beach profile : To show that this is a sandy beach and was made from erosional process. The Quadrat: · I threw the quadrat along the foreshore midshore and backshore so I could begin my investigation of the beach.I then procceded to...
    666 Words | 2 Pages
  • Describe the fieldwork and research you would undertake in order to investigate changes in coastal land use over time
    Describe the fieldwork and research you would undertake in order to investigate changes in coastal land use over time -Weymouth Section A - Background information: Weymouth and Portland is the smallest district in Dorset at 16 square miles however still contains a population of 64, 460 people, meaning it has the highest density of people in the County (though not as high as Bournemouth and Poole). Weymouth and Portland are well known for the quality of their beaches and both are popular...
    528 Words | 2 Pages
  • Landform Essay - 961 Words
    Saji Begum With reference to one or more located coastlines, examine the factors responsible for landforms of coastal erosion. (25 marker) Most of our landforms on the coastline are formed because of coastal erosion. But firstly it is essential to understand what coastal erosions are. Coastal erosion involves the breaking down and removal of material along a coastline by the movement of wind & water. They are sorted in two categories, Marine processes and Sub aerial processes. A few methods of...
    961 Words | 3 Pages
  • Sydneys Nortahn Beaches - 2019 Words
    Research Assessment Task 2 - 2013 Biophysical Interactions (Northen Beaches - Erosion) Luke Sheldrick Investigate one issue in one of the biophysical components, to illustrate how an understanding of biophysical processes contributes to sustainable management in the environment Luke Sheldrick Investigate one issue in one of the biophysical components, to illustrate how an understanding of biophysical processes contributes to sustainable management in the environment Luke Sheldrick...
    2,019 Words | 7 Pages
  • Coastal Regulation Zones in India
    Coastal Regulation Zone History Decisions to protect and improve human environment in conference of united nations at stolkhome in June 1972 Promulgumation of environmental protection act in 1986 Superceding effect over all acts 3(2)(V) of the act empowers for restrictions of industries,operation or processes in a particular area or zone. Late prime minister Smt. Indira Gandhi,after visiting goa beach,found it expedient to impose restrictions for protection of beach. Study...
    1,183 Words | 5 Pages
  • Tide rise and falls - 309 Words
     1 st Stanza o While tide is continuously rising and falling, this represents the ocean currents as it hits the coast of the shore. o The setting is changing and the daylight is starting to run out while the curlew birds) getting dark. o The tides shows time as being continuous and the tide keeps on repeating the same motion.  2 nd Stanza o The whole town is covered by darkness. Darkness is shown as a living-being because it “settles” as if it is taking a rest upon the roofs and...
    309 Words | 2 Pages
  • Alanya - 281 Words
    This spring vacation I spent in Alanya. So, now I’m going to tell you more about this city. Alanya is a popular seaside resort in the south of Turkey. It boasts the longest beaches at the Mediterranean seaside but there’s more to this city than beautiful nature and beaches. Alanya also boasts a lot of cultural and historical sights. One of the tourist destinations that is worth taking a closer look is the Alanya Castle, a citadel which was built in 1226. Most major landmarks in the city are...
    281 Words | 1 Page
  • Coastal Processes and Landforms - 809 Words
    Coastal Processes and Landforms Constructive Waves - Swell or surging waves created by distant storms (low frequency (6-8/minute); long wavelength (up to 100m); low flatter waves (<1m); low energy and stronger swash than backwash Destructive Waves - Storm or plunging waves created by local winds / storms (high frequency (10-12/minute); short wavelength (<20m); high steep wave (>1m); high energy and backwash stronger than swash Fetch - the distance over which wind has blown (i.e....
    809 Words | 3 Pages
  • Background of the Study - 328 Words
    CHAPTER 1.0 INTRODUCTION 1.1 BACKGROUND/OVERVIEW Being one of the most tropical places in Asia, beaches, water sports complexes, swimming pools has been one of our main check lists during the hotter days and people, local or foreign alike visit the country for our most splendid water destinations. Aqua Park according to the Wikipedia is an amusement park that features water play areas such as water slides, splash pads, spraygrounds, lazy rivers and other recreational bathing, swimming and...
    328 Words | 1 Page
  • Seaside description - 298 Words
    It is a windy sunset, with lots of coconut trees growing sideways.The sky is like a painting, from the dark blue to purplish-red, and no sun can be seen. Many coconut trees are to be seen along the shore, tall, short, straight, sideways and many various sizes. It was a calm seashore and there is a hut built near the sea, with a long wooden bridge connecting it to the shore. A few more of these hut are also found further away down the seashore. There are little children walking along the sand,...
    298 Words | 1 Page
  • The Marginal World - 397 Words
    THE MARGINAL WORLD The edge of the sea is a place in which wave, by wave had broken against the land, and where the ocean never rests, never stops, it is always in constant movement, it is always changing, and the ebb tide knows extreme parts of the world, and it is exposed to different temperatures. Living in there, in the shore, is difficult for animals only the most hardly and adaptable of them can survive, but there is a variety of species in there, there are also deep in the sand, were...
    397 Words | 1 Page
  • David s Work Three
    Two or more erosion caused landforms. The formation of a stump; a good example of this would be Old Harry and Old Harry’s Wife in Dorset. This erosion caused feature is formed through many processes such as hydraulic action, attrition, corrosion. The geology caused to form this landform is a medium hardness rock; this means there is a medium resistance to abrasive and attritive erosion. The general formation of this landform starts with an opening or crack (weakness) in a cliff side. Over time,...
    380 Words | 1 Page
  • Christchurch Bay - 574 Words
    Time Line of Christchurch Bay 1366- there was a severe erosion at Highcliffe. 1587- Richard Popinjay’s produced a sketch map of Isle of Wight. 1587- Dorset and Hampshire defences were set up. 1595- John Norden created a map of Hampshire, showing the village of Hordwell 1654- Old data of the previous data were seen by Burton 1695- Robert Morden modified the map created by John Norden 1703- on the 24th of November, a very severe storm known as the Daniel Defoe’s storm appeared,...
    574 Words | 2 Pages
  • Natural Process That Has Been Most Significant in the Formation of a Natural Feature at the Muriwai Coastal Environment
    QUESTION 1: (a) Identify ONE natural process that has been most significant in the formation of a natural feature shown on you map/diagram. Justify why this is the most important process forming this feature. The Muriwai coastal environment is a unique environment where the coastline and relief is constantly being shaped into landforms such as caves, arches, stacks and stumps through marine erosional processes and wave refraction. The combination of these processes working in...
    636 Words | 2 Pages
  • Coastal Regulation Zone - 3148 Words
    Coastal Regulation Zone (CRZ) Notification, 2011 – its Livelihood implication for the Traditional Fisher folk Russel Ignatius (russelignatiusmsw@gmail.com) Abstract: The articles highlights the important points stressed in the recent Coastal Regulation Zone Notification, 2011, published on 7th January, 2011. It journeys through the livelihood implications it has on the traditional fisher folk, the original inhabitants of the coast. It reflects the positive and negative lineage of the...
    3,148 Words | 10 Pages
  • Contribution to the study of coastal floristry biodiversity in Oran
    J. Bio. & Env. Sci. 2015 Journal of Biodiversity and Environmental Sciences (JBES) ISSN: 2220-6663 (Print), 2222-3045 (Online) http://www.innspub.net Vol. 6, No. 4, p. 75-79, 2015 RESEARCH PAPER OPEN ACCESS Contribution to the study of coastal floristry biodiversity in Oran Haddad Fatma Zohra1, Frih Faiza1, Noureddine Benaissa1, Zitouni Boutiba1, Ionela Dobrin2 1 Department of Biology, University of Oran, Laboratory Network for Environmental Monitoring (LRSE), Oran, Algeria 2 Department of...
    1,756 Words | 18 Pages
  • research paper - 1820 Words
     Plum Island Residents Fighting a Losing Battle Throughout history man has built homes along the shorelines of the sea. We built fishing villages to provide sustenance to our people. Life on the seacoast has shifted from one of necessity of sustainability to one of luxury. Though some local people still making a living by harvesting the fruit of the sea these folks are far from living in the lap of luxury. The fact is the “average” person cannot afford to build an oceanfront home. Many...
    1,820 Words | 5 Pages
  • Examine the Factors Affecting the Development of Landforms of Coastal Deposition (25).
    Examine the factors affecting the development of landforms of coastal deposition (25). Coastal environment is the dynamic interface between land and sea with many distinctive coastal landforms, given rise by a range of physical processes, including deposition. Beaches are landforms of deposition. Its development is affected by wave characteristics, specifically constructive wave. They have long wavelengths are long and wave height often less than one metre. The breaking waves have low...
    337 Words | 1 Page
  • Soft Engineering and Hard Engineering
    Hard engineering refers to the construction of physical structures to defend against erosive power of waves To protect a coast from erosion, people have built seawalls in front of a cliff or along the coast. A seawall is usually made of concrete. It acts as a buffer and absorbs energy of breaking waves especially during storms where the waves are strong, thus protecting the coast. A seawall shields and protects the coast from the direct impact of the incoming waves, thus reducing erosion....
    1,543 Words | 5 Pages
  • With Reference to Examples, Examine the Possible Impacts of Global Warming on Coastal Regions...
    With reference to examples, examine the possible impacts of global warming on coastal regions... Global Warming is one of the main causes for a rise in sea level. When there is a rise in sea level it can lead to coastal flooding which leaves devastating effects the coastal areas and small coastal settlements. These impacts can be split into environmental and socioeconomic. Some of the main environmental impacts of global warming are that there is an increase in the amount and speed of erosion...
    523 Words | 2 Pages
  • Landforms by Erosion - 2318 Words
    Landforms by Erosion (erosion is the main process) * High-energy waves * Rocks that are easily eroded 1) Cliff and shore platforms Point : A cliff is a high, steep rock face along the coast. Explanation: A cliff is formed when waves repeatedly pound against a rocky coast Elaboration: This weakens the rock, causing the lines of weakness to form in the rock face * Over time, the waves erode the coast to cut a notch along the lines of weakness. * The notch may be...
    2,318 Words | 9 Pages
  • Holderness Case Study - 2389 Words
    The Holderness coastline is very low lying and runs along the North East coast of the UK from the chalk cliffs of Flamborough Head in the north to the sand spit of Spurn Point in the south, a distance of 61 km. The Holderness Coast is famous due to its history of being one of Europe's fastest eroding coastlines. Essentially erosion is the process by which coastline rocks are broken up by the action of the sea and transported out to sea or along the coast by waves and the wind. Coastal...
    2,389 Words | 7 Pages
  • Geography Sba on Coastal Features
    Geography School Based Assessment ( S.B.A) Topic: What Are The Effects Of Wave Processes On The Coastline Of Robin’s Bay St Mary. Centre Number: 100013 Candidate Name: ********* Registration Number: Year of Examination: 2012 School: Calabar High School Teacher: ********** Territory: Jamaica Contents Topic ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………3 Aim ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………3 Methodology...
    1,773 Words | 8 Pages
  • coastal processes - 598 Words
    Coastal Processes Coasts are shaped by the sea and the action of waves. Waves act in different ways, through the processes of erosion, transportation and deposition. Coasts: A coast is found where the land meets the sea. Coasts undergo change due to coastal processes and (as with rivers) there are main processes at work: Erosion Transportation Deposition Each of these processes involves the power of the sea and the effect of waves that are carried to shore. However other factors...
    598 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Development of Swahili - 351 Words
    3. What did the development of Swahili demonstrate about the nature and workings of the Indian Ocean economy in early-modern times? The development and evolution of the Swahili language was significant in the respect that it is an example of the changes that were necessary for the Indian Ocean economy to survive. The coastal areas of East Africa saw influence from several fronts, notably Portuguese, Arabic and Persian influence especially in terms of the development of the Swahili language....
    351 Words | 1 Page
  • Goldcoast Erosion - 365 Words
    How has erosion effect beaches in recent times? In recent decades erosion has become a major issue to beaches around Australia, since beaches are temporary features. There is always sand being removed and sand being added to them, often, they change drastically during the year, depending upon the frequency of storms. Eventually, a beach erodes because the supply of sand to the beach cannot keep up with the loss of sand to the sea. The Sand dunes and vegetation help to hold the sand in place...
    365 Words | 1 Page
  • Gcse Geography Cromer Controlled Asessment
    EDEXCEL UNIT 4 GEOGRAPHY CONTROLLED ASSESSMENT HYPOTHESIS INVESTIGATION NORTH NORFOLK COASTAL EROSION AND MANAGEMENT [pic] INTRODUCTION HYPOTHESIS ONE- Coastal management is essential to sustain the economy of Cromer. I think this will be proven by my investigation as without coastal management there would be disruption to businesses. HYPOTHESIS TWO - Coastal processes pose a greater threat to people in Happisburgh than they do to Cromer. I think this will be...
    876 Words | 5 Pages
  • Geo Sba Cxc - 544 Words
    Candidate Name: Nathaniel J. Adiah Candidate Number: Subject: Geography School: Presentation College Chaguanas Year of Exam: Teacher’s Name: Aim: To identify, describe and account for the features of erosion and deposition along Las Cuevas Bay. Candidate Name: Candidate Number: Subject: Geography School: Year of Exam: Teacher’s Name: Aim: To identify, describe and account for the features of erosion and deposition along Las Cuevas...
    544 Words | 4 Pages
  • bad boys - 311 Words
    Tremaine Murphy May 6, 2013 The Army Corps of Engineers, the federal agency charged with maintaining the nation’s coastline, said some of the 100 miles of barrier dunes in the region were built by the corps, others by local governments themselves. Many of the projects were built to withstand storms less powerful than Hurricane Sandy, the corps said, and even in places where the surge cut through the sand, the dunes helped to soften the blow. Cliff Jones, a program manager with the corps’s...
    311 Words | 1 Page
  • Vacationing at the Beach or in the Mountains - 364 Words
    People are always looking forward to their vacation period and there are many options where to choose. I think that the two most common places people choose for taking a vacation are the beaches and the mountains. Both places offer a variety of fun activities. The beach offers activities that the mountain cannot offer and vice versa. The mountain and the beach are totally different from the climate, the types of activities and the locations. Climate is always important in order to enjoy...
    364 Words | 1 Page
  • Hengisbury Head Coastal Processes
    What are geomorphic processes and how do they affect the coast at Hengistbury Head? Setting the scene Hengistbury Head is a scenic and historic headland near the town of Bournemouth on the south coast of England. It stands mid-way between Poole harbour and Hurst spit and forms the main division between Poole and Christchurch Bays. Coastal Processes | Description | Sub Aerial | Coastal erosional processes that are not linked to the action of the sea. Erosion occurs via rain, weathering...
    359 Words | 2 Pages
  • Lab on Species Diversity - 721 Words
    LAB #3 TITLE: SPECIES DIVERSITY AIM: To determine how moisture content of sand influences the distribution of fauna along a sandy beach. MATERIALS: 100m transect,1m x 1m quadrat,shovel,30cm ruler,40cm x40cm sieve, digital probe, sweep net PROCEDURE: 1. The area was selected for the 100m transect to be laid. 2. The transect was carefully placed ensuring that the end of the transect was in the moist part of sand. 3. The quadrat was placed along the transect on either sides....
    721 Words | 3 Pages
  • With reference to named areas, describe and explain different ways coastal areas can be protected from the effects of natural processes
    Coastal areas can be protected from the effects of natural processes, for example the effects of erosion, deposition, transportation, weathering and mass movement. The most problematic of these is erosion. There are three types of erosion: hydraulic action, abrasion and attrition which all contribute together to erode cliffs, causing the coastline to be vulnerable and weaker. The cause of erosion can then lead to mass movement for example rock fall and slumping which can affect the coastline...
    706 Words | 2 Pages
  • Coastal Management and the Perceptions of Different Groups of People About This Issue.
    Coastal management is managing development along the coast in a sustainable way so that it will not be spoiled for future generations and it is a very important to Australians because over 85% of our current population live within 50km of the coast. Furthermore, more than 25% of Australia’s current population lives within three kilometres of the coast. All the human traffic our coastline receives damages the delicate ecosystems that are trying to co-inhabit the area. Foreshore developments such...
    567 Words | 2 Pages
  • Coastal Defences - 733 Words
    Sea Walls are an example of Happisburgh’s coastal defences. They reflect the energy of the waves back into the sea and work best at high tide. But as the wave backwashes; it erodes the base of the wall. This area weakens and could eventually collapse A sea wall will be necessary at a large beach, as the sea wall will come into actions during high tides and storm surges Cost= £2000-£5000 per metre Timber Groynes are mainly used to act against long-shore drift. They do this by interrupting the...
    733 Words | 3 Pages
  • Muriwai Information - 1963 Words
    Formation of the Land Geomorphologic Processes This is about how the Muriwai Coastal Environment (M.C.E.) land has been created and shaped over time. I.e. it’s all about Rocks! The west coast’s geomorphology has been influenced by tectonic processes (rocks), alluvial processes (water) and climatic processes (weather). Hydrological Processes Hydrological...
    1,963 Words | 8 Pages
  • The sea by James Reeves - 357 Words
    The sea by James Reeves. 1) The two aspects being identified are the characteristics of the dog and the sea. James Reeves is personifying the sea as if it were a dog. 2) James Reeves is mentioning the vastness of the sea by calling it giant. By stating the sea as grey he means that it’s opaque and to give the image that the sea is strong and frightening. 3) Both the dog and the sea roll on the beach throughout the day. The dog runs and rolls along the sandy beach and the waves from the sea...
    357 Words | 2 Pages
  • Barrier Islands Essay - 1182 Words
    Barrier Islands Barrier Islands, which are also known as barrier spits, are elongate, narrow islands of sand or sediment that lied parallel to the coastline and are separated from the mainland by a shallow sound, bay or Lagoon. Most barrier islands are along trailing edge and marginal sea coast where continental shelves are wide and gently sloping. The majority of the barrier islands in North America are along the Atlantic and Gulf Coast. The formation of the barrier islands is not fully...
    1,182 Words | 3 Pages
  • Nha Trang - 467 Words
    Nha Trang beach Travel around the world is the interesting and attractive finding with many people.For me,exploring a lot of beautiful sights is very wonderful.However,in all of the charming sceneries such as the forest,the mountain,the river or bay,I like the beach best.I have travelled to several beaches of our country,for instance Do Son beach,Phan Thiet beach but I feel that Nha Trang beach where I was born and grew up is the best wonderful beach with so many beautiful sceneries.A lot of...
    467 Words | 1 Page
  • Man of God - 8316 Words
    A natural hazard is a threat of a naturally occurring event that will have a negative effect on the environment. Entire Himalayan region is prone to rain-induced hazards in the form of flash flood, cloudburst or glacial lake outburst flood. Many Himalayan natural hazards are earthquakes, tsunamis, hurricanes, flooding, coastal erosion, etc. An earthquake is a process that results from a sudden release of stored energy that radiates shock waves. Coastal erosion is a physical process by which...
    8,316 Words | 22 Pages
  • Coastal Management Comprehensive Notes
    Hard Engineering Seawalls How it is designed to overcome the problem Sea walls are usually built along the front of cliffs, often to protect settlements. A seawall is a structure constructed parallel to the coastline that shelters the shore from wave action. This structure has many different designs; it can be used to protect a cliff from wave attack and improve slope stability and it can also dissipate wave energy on sandy coasts. Challenges /Limitations /Disadvantages  However, a seawall may...
    2,684 Words | 9 Pages
  • 2013xxx - 2437 Words
    2013 HKDSE Geography exam analysis Paper 1 (Compulsory part) Section A Multiple-choice questions (40 questions, total 22 marks) Topics HKDSE Q. no. 2012 2013 Opportunities and risks Earth’s structure and plates 6 9 Internal forces and processes Compressional, tensional and lateral forces Folding, faulting and vulcanicity Plate boundaries Constructive, destructive, conservative Plate movement and resultant landforms Along constructive plate boundaries 7, 8, 9 11, 12...
    2,437 Words | 22 Pages
  • Geog - 2820 Words
    GEOGRAPHY PORTFOLIO BY EDEXEL GEOGRAPHY CONTROLLED ASSESSMENT 2011: What factors affect the gradient of the beach? ( Contents Page 1. Title page...............................pg 1 2. Contents page........................pg 2 3. Purpose of investigation.........pg 3,4,5 4. Methods of Data Collection.....pg 7,8 5. Data Representation.................pg 9,10,11,12,13,14 6. Analysis & Conclusion.......................pg ,15,...
    2,820 Words | 21 Pages
  • Effect of Breakwater on Wave Energy Dissipation
    EFFECT OF BREAKWATERS ON WAVE ENERGY DISSIPATION ABSTRACT The northern Egyptian coasts are subjected to many changes in shoreline balance due to waves and coastal currents. To protect and develop these coasts, many types of coastal protection structures have been used. This research demonstrates the effect of different systems of coastal protection structures on wave energy dissipation. By using the CGWAVE numerical model, the effect of each one and interaction between these structures...
    3,380 Words | 27 Pages
  • geography - 4241 Words
     The coastal zone is one of the most densely populated areas globally because of favourable locational factors, yet it is an area of immense environmental value. This topic allows students to carry out detailed studies of contrasting coastal environments at a local/ small scale, exploring competing and conflicting land uses, and evaluating the pressures created by development. It considers how vulnerable and valuable coastlines face a growing physical risk from rapid coastal erosion...
    4,241 Words | 17 Pages
  • What Are Rocky Shores?
    1. What are rocky shores? Rocky shores are areas of bedrock exposed between the extreme high and extreme low tide levels on the seashore. 2. How are organisms on a rocky shore distributed? Plants and animals are distributed on the shore in horizontal zones that relate to the tolerance of the species to either exposure to air or submergence in water during the tidal cycle. 3. What three types of bedrock are typically found in a rocky shore ecosystem? Three types of bedrocks are rocky...
    644 Words | 2 Pages
  • Ghfghf - 450 Words
    Dover Beach by Matthew Arnold (1822-1888) The sea is calm to-night. The tide is full, the moon lies fair Upon the straits; on the French coast the light Gleams and is gone; the cliffs of England stand; Glimmering and vast, out in the tranquil bay. [5] Come to the window, sweet is the night-air! Only, from the long line of spray Where the sea meets the moon-blanched land, Listen! you hear the grating roar Of pebbles which the waves draw back, and fling, [10] At their return, up the...
    450 Words | 2 Pages
  • Soft Engineering Coastal Protections
    A coastal dune is a ridge of sand piled up by wind on the coast. Coastal dunes are common in countries where the coasts have vegetation like spinifex and marram grass and are exposed to strong winds from the oceans. The dunes form as a result of the vegetation trapping and stabilizing the sand. On some coasts, the dunes extend several kilometers inland and to heights of more than 100 meters. Coastal dunes, which act as barriers along the coast, protect human property like houses and roads...
    737 Words | 2 Pages
  • Vactions on the Beach vs. the Mountain
    Vacations at the Beach Vs. Mountains People are always looking forward to their family vacation time. There are many options where to choose. But, I think that the two most common places people choose for taking a vacation are the beaches, and the mountains. Both places offer a variety of fun activities. Vacation at the mountains and at the beaches is totally different from each other, regarding climate, types of activities, and the location of beaches and mountains. Climate is always...
    471 Words | 2 Pages
  • puerto galera - 460 Words
    Municipality: Puerto galera Profile: The town of Puerto Galera in the province of Oriental Mindoro is located in the northeast portion of the island Mindoro, about 130 kilometers south of Manila. Mindoro is separated from Luzon, the Philippine’s biggest island by the Verde Passage. Puerto Galera, which was elevated to the first-class municipality from being the third-class 2009, is composed of 13 barangays, 11 of which are coastal. The coastal barangays are Poblacion, Tabinay, Dulangan,...
    460 Words | 2 Pages
  • Water Biomes - 780 Words
    Water Biomes Marshland is covered with grasses, reeds, sedges, and cattails. These plants all have their roots in soil covered or saturated with water and its leaves held above water.Marshes may be freshwater or salt. Freshwater marshes develop along the shallow edges of lakes and slow-moving rivers, forming when ponds and lakes become filled with sediment. Salt marshes occur on coastal tidal flats. Inland salt marshes occupy the edges of lakes. They affect the supply of nutrients, the...
    780 Words | 3 Pages
  • Geographic Factors and China’s Regional Development Under Market Reforms, 1978–1998
    This question is inspired by Bao et al. (2002) “Geographic factors and China’s regional development under market reforms, 1978–1998”. The article can be found on the course website. Please read this paper before answering the following questions. a) In the first lecture of this course, we emphasized the importance of institutions in explaining the differences in economic prosperity across regions. In this paper, the authors emphasized the role of geographical factors in explaining the...
    1,244 Words | 4 Pages
  • Geology - 744 Words
    How has society responded to coastal changes initiated by sand transportation, and have these responses been wise environmentally and economically? What do you do when mid-latitude cyclones get larger, strong frontal winds are more frequent, and waves and currents get stronger? How can we control high waves and storm surges that drive more sediment transport, permanently changing the coast? Coastal dunes, of all shapes and sizes, are are dense enough to prevent rapid and significant...
    744 Words | 3 Pages
  • Intertidal Wetlands Notes - 444 Words
    INTERTIDAL WETLANDS • Intertidal wetlands develop in coastal areas which are subject to periodic inundation by salty water • They are found in estuarine environments in the limits of the tidal range • Previously thought of as mosquito infested wetlands, they are now considered highly valued ecosystems which protect the quality of coastal waters and provides breeding grounds and habitats for a variety of marine life, are found along tropical and sub-tropical coastlines between 25ْN and 25ْC...
    444 Words | 2 Pages
  • Economic Consequences of Global Warming
    In recent years, the maximum temperature records around the world continue to be broken, and the phenomenon of global warming can not be ignored anymore. Looking back in history, this phenomenon not only appeared in recent years, in the past, the losses global warming brought to us were innumerable, and we can not possibly think what will happen in future. The direct losing in economic was by natural disaster which caused by global warming, and the indirect losing was impossible to measure yet....
    519 Words | 2 Pages

All Coast Essays