Choctaw Essays & Research Papers

Best Choctaw Essays

  • Choctaw Indians - 323 Words
    The Choctaw Indians The Choctaw Indians is a tribe of Musksgean stock .The Choctaws were once part of a larger tribe that included the Greeks and Seminoles and are considered one of the five civilized tribes (Cherokees , Greeks, Choctaws , Seminoles, and Chickasaws) . At one time Choctaw territory extended from Mississippi to Georgia, but by the time Europeans began to arrive in North America they were primarily in Mississippi and Louisiana. The Choctaw Indians were into cultivation ,...
    323 Words | 1 Page
  • Choctaw Indians - 2031 Words
    The Native Americans are an important part of culture in the United States, and have been living on this land for thousands of years. The Native American cultures have strongly influenced the United States in many different ways during today’s society. In 1783, the United States was a new nation with about 3 million people living, for the most part, the Native Americas controlled most lands west of the Appalachian Mountains forming tribes, building lives for themselves. Native Americans are...
    2,031 Words | 6 Pages
  • The Choctaw Tribe - 1331 Words
    The Choctaw Tribe The Choctaw Indians were an important tribe, and the largest of the Muskogean tribes. The Choctaws have two stories about their origins in their traditional homeland in central Mississippi. One is that their ancestors came from west of the Mississippi River and settled in what is now the homeland. The other is that the tribe is descended from ancestors who were formed by a spirit from the damp earth of Nanih Waiyah, a large mound in northeastern Mississippi. Either way, the...
    1,331 Words | 4 Pages
  • Choctaw Mounted Rifles - 835 Words
    Bailey Wright Oklahoma History March 3, 2015 Choctaws and the Civil War The Civil War brought on trying times to not only the American people but also the tribes. The tribes were given a choice of joining the Confederacy or the Union. This decision would change all the lives of the tribal people. What would happen if they chose the side that lost? How would that impact them? These questions flood the brains ...
    835 Words | 2 Pages
  • All Choctaw Essays

  • The Mowa Band of Choctaw Indians
    Sandra Hayes Student #74959 Professor Dale Johnson BBA 300 Intercultural Communications December 13, 2011 The MOWA Band of Choctaw Indians The Choctaw Indians of Alabama are a band of Indians that managed to remain behind in the outer regions of north Mobile and south Washington counties after their tribal lands were given up to the United States in 1830. Beginning in 1830, the most significant period of their removal from their homelands, the majority of the Choctaw tribe was forced along...
    2,130 Words | 6 Pages
  • Economic Influence of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians
    The history of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians between the 19th and 20th century was no different than any other Indian tribe located east of the Mississippi River. They were treated poorly by the government, lived in poverty, were scantily educated, and many were forced to relocate from their homelands in Mississippi to the Oklahoma Indian territory. But because of the hard work of one Indian Chief, Chief Phillip Martin, the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians now flourishes....
    1,647 Words | 5 Pages
  • Superior Council of Louisiana, Excerts from Debated on Whether to Intervene in a Choctaw-Chickasaw War (1723)
    Jamie Eaves Paper #1 Feb. 18, 2013 4.2 Superior Council of Louisiana, Excerpts from Debates on Whether to Intervene in a Choctaw-Chickasaw War (1723) In 1723, the council of the early French Louisiana met to make a decision on whether to intervene in a war that was being fought between two of the Native American tribes, the Choctaws and the Chickasaws. This document contains six excerpts from their discussions over the matter and their decision to let the war between the two tribes...
    881 Words | 3 Pages
  • Indian Removal Act - 897 Words
    Critical Thinking Essay For thousands of years, Indians freely inhabited American land with peace and harmony. Then, all of that drastically changed when the white settlers began encroaching on their territory. Only the Five Civilized Tribes by the 1830's proved to be the most suitable in this rapidly changing environment, but just when they started adopting the whites' ways of life, they were forced out of their land. Years have passed and Indians still only hold small pieces of territory....
    897 Words | 3 Pages
  • Indian Removal Act - 2222 Words
    Indian Removal Act & Nunahi-duna-dlo-hilu-i In the 1800's, the United States was a nation still learning how to efficiently run a government, and establish credibility as a force to be reckoned with. Expansion was the first priority in which they were determined to achieve. The greatest onslaught of discrimination towards a group of non-resisting people occurred in 1830, when President Andrew Jackson passed the Indian Removal Act; Jackson passed this act in order to further expand the...
    2,222 Words | 6 Pages
  • Andrew Jackson--Tyrant - 1285 Words
    Andrew Jackson—Tyrant? Andrew Jackson, the common man and seventh president of the United States, was a tyrant. He had a tendency to step over his limits of power when he was passionate towards a cause. However, it could be justified that his actions were in favor of the people. A famous incident Jackson was involved in was the Indian Removal Act of 1830. The act gave Jackson the power to make “treaties” with the “Five Civilized Tribes”—the Cherokee, Choctaw, Creek, Chickasaw, and Seminole....
    1,285 Words | 4 Pages
  • A Research on Seminole Wars - 1270 Words
    The Seminole Wars U.S. History 1301.046 Carissa Farley Professor Rumanuk April 3, 2013 The Seminole Wars was one of many wars fought during our nation’s history. Some of the wars in our history were fought over Indian Removal. According to Ron Soodalter, “The Second Seminole War erupted over broken treaties that repeatedly changed the...
    1,270 Words | 4 Pages
  • Seminole Indians - 310 Words
     Title: Seminole Indians The Seminole Indians lived near the ocean in Florida. These areas had a hot and humid climate in the summer and mild climate in the winter. They had lots of rainfall. They used their environment for water, food, and shelter. Plants, animals, water, and wood were available to them. They used fish, plants, and animals for food. They used animal skin, feathers, and cotton for clothing. Wood and hay were used for housing....
    310 Words | 2 Pages
  • Indian Removal Act - 673 Words
    Indian Removal Act On May 28, 1830, Andrew Jackson signed The Indian Removal Act declaring that the government had the power to relocate Native Americans in the southeast to the west of the Mississippi River. The first start of the removal of the Cherokee Indians started in the state of Georgia. Georgia Legislature in 1802 signed a compact giving the federal government claims to western land in exchange for the government to extinguish the Indian titles in the state. Later the Georgia...
    673 Words | 2 Pages
  • Trial of Tears (Dialogue) - 485 Words
    Dialogue: Trial of Tears One afternoon, Derek came by this history teacher's room to learn a little bit extra for fun. The conversation focused mainly on the Trial of Tears. He had heard information about these events in previous history classes, but didn't fully understand. Derek: Hey Mr. Smith, I know Andrew Jackson was a president, but what did he do during the Trials of Tears? Mr. Smith: He was full of contradiction and paradox. Jackson's officials were directed to negotiate a...
    485 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Indian Removal Act - 259 Words
    In this essay I’m going to be talking about the Indian Removal Act in 1830. I will be answer questions like who made the Native Americans relocate. Where did they go? Why did the make them move? How did they travel? What was it that made them make the Native Americans move? During the year of 1830 president congress passed the Indian Removal Act that Andrew Jackson signed. The trail they took the Native Americans on is now called the Trail of Tears. The reason for the name is because there...
    259 Words | 1 Page
  • Trail of Tears - 1103 Words
    Trail of Tears The Indians of America lived mostly peacefully among the people in the states. Though to some they were only to ever be thought of as savages, people who would kill the whites. Others thought of them as less than whites. They were essentially in the same social status or class as the blacks were. Though the land in America more rightfully belonged to them than any persons living there, they were treated like immigrants in a foreign land. They weren’t given the same rights as...
    1,103 Words | 3 Pages
  • How the Indian Removal Act Was Unjust
    it is mainly unconstitutional due to that fact of America's "Manifest Destiny". As American's greed for more land, Indians are pushed further and further west. "This desire for Indian lands was also abetted by the Indian hating mentallity that was peculiar to some American frontiersman. " The Indian Removal itself is unconstitutional due to that fact that Indians were never truly considered Americans or settlers. They had seeked help from the newly appointed president Andrew Jackson but he would...
    386 Words | 2 Pages
  • Code Talkers - 543 Words
    Although throughout history the goverment took advantage of the Native Americans, suprisingly they answered the call of duty to fight for their country in the 1940's. The code talkers are a main part of the victory in World War II. They used a secret code no one could break. The code talkers were made of classified tribes that no one knew about until they were declassified years after the war was over. The Native American code talkers were important because no one could break their code. The...
    543 Words | 2 Pages
  • How Democratic was Andrew Jackson?
    How Democratic Was Andrew Jackson? Andrew Jackson was a democratic man by supporting the people’s choices and wanting their voices to be equally heard, however that is not the case throughout his presidency. He is considered “Democratic” because he wanted everyone’s opinions to be heard and equally represented. Democracy can have different meanings, but ultimately they all correspond with each other. A democracy is a government ran by the people through the representatives that were elected....
    993 Words | 3 Pages
  • trail of tears - 505 Words
    The topic that I decided to use for my research paper is the trail of tears. I decided to use the trail of tears because of its significance to the native American culture and also how this event has gone down as one of the worst moments in American history. The trail of tears included several different tribes like the Cherokee, Seminole and Muscogee tribes just to name a few. These tribes were treated unfairly and many died from starvation and disease during their journey. It began in 1831...
    505 Words | 2 Pages
  • As Long as Grass Grows or Water Runs Questions
    Zinn Chapter 7: As Long as Grass Grows or Water Runs Questions 1. Chapter 7 deals immensely with the Native Americans and their survival based upon the government taking their lands. 2. Zinn showed the impact of the Indian removal by talking about the book Fathers and Children, which shows statistics of the matter. 3. When Thomas Jefferson was Secretary of State, he believed that the Indians should just be left alone. Once he became president, he wanted to remove the Indians. I...
    358 Words | 1 Page
  • Trail of Tears - 850 Words
    Andrew Jackson and the Trail of Tears The Long, Bitter Trail: Andrew Jackson and the Indians was written by Anthony F.C. Wallace. In his book, the main argument was how Andrew Jackson had a direct affect on the mistreatment and removal of the native Americans from their homelands to Indian Territory. It was a trail of blood, a trail of death, but ultimately it was known as the "Trail of Tears". Throughout Jackson's two terms as President, Jackson used his power unjustly. As a man from the...
    850 Words | 2 Pages
  • HIST101ShortPaper - 1067 Words
    HIST101 B006 Sum 14 The Relocation of the Native Americans: An Analysis The forced relocation of thousands of Native Americans will remain a blemish on American history simply by virtue of the number of Native Americans that perished during this relocation, as well as the seeming lack of care by the United States. However, many believe that this relocation was something of a necessary evil. President Andrew Jackson was something of the figurehead for decisions regarding these relocations, but...
    1,067 Words | 3 Pages
  • Trail of Tears Article - 1436 Words
    http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail?vid=7&sid=24f22114-93a8-45a7-b75f-95127ae552c5%40sessionmgr4&hid=10&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d#db=n9h&AN=17910229 Benchmarks: U.S. History -- Expansion & Manifest Destiny (1784-1860) Subject Terms: INDIANS of North America ; TRAIL of Tears, 1838-1839 ; CHEROKEE Indians -- Relocation ; JACKSON, Andrew, 1767-1845 ; SEMINOLE Indians ; UNITED States -- History -- 1815-1861 Authors: McGill, Sara Ann Source: Indian...
    1,436 Words | 4 Pages
  • Is Andrew Jackson Democratic?
    Around 8,000 Native Americans died while walking along the Trails of Tears, enforced by Andrew Jackson. Andrew Jackson brutally kicked Native Americans out of their own homes and shoved them into a different location. This tragic event is known as the Native American removal, occurring from 1831 all the way into the 1840’s. Events like this one shows that Andrew Jackson was not a democratic president and should not be thought of as one. He was not a democratic because he didn’t help all people...
    769 Words | 2 Pages
  • Seminole Indians - 692 Words
    Food: Seminole men were good hunters. Fish were speared from canoes. They caught otter, raccoon, bobcats, alligator, turtle, and birds. To catch deer, they would burn a patch of grass. When the new grass grew in, the deer came to feast, and the Seminole caught the deer. Villagers planted crops behind their house and on nearby hammocks. They did not weed or fertilize or irrigate. Wild plants mingled with the ones they had planted. The Seminole planted pumpkins, squash, and corn. Corn was the main...
    692 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Effects of Removal of American Indian Tribes
    The removal of American Indian tribes from lands east of the Mississippi River to what is now the state of Oklahoma is one of the tragic episodes in American history. Early treaties signed by American agents and representatives of Indian tribes guaranteed peace and the integrity of Indian territories, primarily to assure that the lucrative fur trade would continue without interruption. American settlers' hunger for Indian land, however, led to violent conflict in many cases, and succeeding...
    4,491 Words | 16 Pages
  • The Trail of Tears - 1622 Words
    The Five Civilized Tribes and the “Trail of Tears” The Indian Removal Act and the “Trail of Tears” was one of the worst tragedies in American history. It shows that the US government was forcing Native Americans to move from their homelands and endure great hardships of famine, cold and harsh weather, long treks on foot, and unfamiliar places with no regards to their safety, culture, history and wellbeing. Since the settling of North America by European colonists, relations between Native...
    1,622 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Big Chief Tablet - 633 Words
    THE BIG CHIEF TABLET By S.B. Watson My first clear memory of writing is at the young age of 5, before the first grade, when my mother took me to the five and dime store to purchase school supplies. We bought crayons, pencils, erasures, scissors and glue. We put it all in a white cigar box. We also picked up this red writing tablet that was thicker than most books I had ever seen. On the cover was this Big Indian Chief. I remember thinking, “Why did this chief have his picture on the...
    633 Words | 2 Pages
  • Andrew Jackson - 261 Words
    Andrew Jackson Andrew Jackson was the first modern president. He disagreed with some of the ways Presidents before him ruled. When he was elected, he fired many officials and hired people who were loyal to him. He also exercised the Veto, and defied Supreme Court rulings. He was the one who made the Presidency what it is today. Jackson had plans for the expansion of America, as he thought expansion the key to America’s success. Many Whites were afraid of the Native Americans and of...
    261 Words | 1 Page
  • Ms.Davenport - 640 Words
    A great president is someone who is a strong leader, makes choices that will change the country for the better, and does what is best for the good of all the people. Some people would consider Andrew Jackson to be a great president because he did things such as revolutionizing presidential campaigning, which made him the first modern president, and using his presidential power to veto bills that he saw unfit or harmful. Others would argue that Andrew Jackson was a terrible president because he...
    640 Words | 2 Pages
  • Andrew Jackson a Hero or a Villian
     Andrew Jackson a Hero or a Villain During Jackson’s presidency many would say that he was a hero while others would speak of him as a villain; it all depends on the point of view one perceives it. If someone was a farmer or a common man, they most likely would say he was a hero, but if an individual was a Native American or from South Carolina they would probably refer to him as a villain. Andrew Jackson was born poor in the border of North and South Carolina and raised by a single mother,...
    672 Words | 2 Pages
  • Indian Removal Policy of Andrew Jackson
    The Government had agreed to deal with the Natives through "formal treaties", but a lot of changes were made as the government erased and redrew treaty line after treaty line, making their way more towards West. However, many Americans felt respect towards the Indians. They wanted them to be part of their society so they tried to Christianize them, civilize them, gave them the chance to attain literacy. Some Tribes resisted and some followed, especially the "Five Civilized Tribes"-which included...
    303 Words | 1 Page
  • Andrew Jackson and the Removal of the Native Americans
    J Fircha Honors US History I 2 March 2012 Removal of Indians DBQ All presidents have a legacy; some good, some bad. Andrew Jackson’s legacy is the Indian Removal Act. This act was not supported by the Supreme Court, made Native Americans leave the places that they called home for countless years, and had a huge impact on Native Americans personally. In 1830, with consent and encouragement from President Andrew Jackson, many Indians were wrongly forced off of their native lands and onto...
    657 Words | 2 Pages
  • Compare And Contrast Songs - 274 Words
    Kathy Thai Compare and Contrast ENG 102 The two songs “Indian Reservation” by Paul Revere and The Raiders, and “Seminole Wind” by John Anderson expressed emotion, culture, and religion. “Indian Reservation” song has more of an ‘upbeat’ tempo, and the lyrics that the band sang are a personal view of a Native American or Cherokee tribe. The lyrics seemed angry as they sang about how the Cherokee tribe turned into a mess by ...
    274 Words | 1 Page
  • Indian Removal DBQ Google Docs
    Moss 1 Braden Moss Mr. Boyd 10/27/14 1st Period Indian Removal DBQ Ever since the American people arrived at the New World they have continually driven the Native Americans out of their native lands. The decision of the Jackson administration to remove the Cherokee Indians to lands west of the Mississippi River in the 1830s was not the only viable decision Jackson had in view of the issues, but Jackson had many reasons why he thought the decision was valid even though the Supreme Court said it...
    719 Words | 3 Pages
  • John G. Burnett - 649 Words
    Cause and effect John G. Burnett English 101 A03 February 20 2011 Analysis Essay/Cause and Effect of Removal of the Cherokees By John G. Burnett During Andrew Jackson’s presidency from 1829 to 1837, a lot of controversial decisions were made. The removal of Cherokee Indians in the 1830’s was one, and this was more a change of the national policy than a reformulation. Since the Spanish came to the New World from the 1500’s, the continent’s inhabitants- Indians, were there. Beginning...
    649 Words | 2 Pages