Blues Essays & Research Papers

Best Blues Essays

  • The Blue - 1357 Words
    The Blues is a musical form and genre, which originated in South America within the African-American communities. It originated near the end of the 19th century, and was rooted from spirituals, work songs, field hollers (which are very similar to work songs, but some do not have lyrics), shouts and rhymes. The blues form in jazz, rhythm and blues and rock and roll; and each is characterised by a specific chord progression, the most common being the twelve bar blues. The blues notes, are played...
    1,357 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Blues - 593 Words
    16 October 2013 The Blues Chicago has been branded as the “Blues Capital of the World”, with nearly all of the genre’s most prominent and clever musicians as either natives of Chicago or securing their careers once moving to the city. However, Chicago is not the origin of the Blues. Though the exact derivation of the Blues was on no account confirmed, customarily, it is acknowledged that it was sustained in the North Mississippi River Delta in the late nineteenth century following the Civil...
    593 Words | 2 Pages
  • Jazz and Blues - 524 Words
    Thesis Statement: Blues and Jazz are different in several major ways. I. Blues and Jazz are different in terms of feeling. A. By performing or listening to the Blues, one is able to overcome sadness. 1. Blues is based on the music of African-American playing to express longing for better life and lost loves, jobs, and money. 2. Because African-American, in the past, did not know about music theory, they played out of major scale notes, and therefore, makes the feeling of...
    524 Words | 2 Pages
  • The Blues Brothers - 711 Words
     26 November 2013 The Blues Brothers The Blues Brothers is an American comedy directed by John Landis and was released in 1980. The film follows convict Jake and his brother Elwood Blues, who go on “a mission from God” to save the Catholic orphanage they grew up in from shutting down. By doing so, they reunite their band and organize a performance to earn $5,000 to pay off the owed tax while being chased by a deranged ex, Illinoisan Nazis’, the Good Ole Boys’, a western/country band, and...
    711 Words | 2 Pages
  • All Blues Essays

  • Blues and Ragtime - 876 Words
    Ragtime was a very influential part of the development of jazz. Ragtime became very popular in the late 1800's. Ragtime's distinct style set it apart from the other genres. Syncopation is what defines this art form. This is when the loud accents fall in between the beats. Anything that is syncopated is basically ragtime. One of the most important ragtime composers was Scott Joplin. Like all great artists, Joplin did not restrict himself to this favored art form. Both before the advent of...
    876 Words | 3 Pages
  • Blues Music - 4307 Words
    A Study of History, Forms, and Influence of Blues Music John Elmer C. Bayangos Communication 2 Professor Cynthia S. Sanguyu March 29, 2012 Abstract This study describes how important the blues is as a type or genre of music It aims to discuss the origin of blues music and how it evolved through time. It also intends to identify, enumerate, and evaluate the differences of each forms of blues music. It will show why and how the blues affects the formation of different genres of...
    4,307 Words | 11 Pages
  • Sonnys Blues - 930 Words
    Sonnys Blues takes place during the middle of the 20th century, a time when jazz music was at its peak of popularity in Harlem. It is a beautiful story about two brothers who seemingly love each other but have a very difficult time understanding each others lives. The older brother, who remains nameless, feels inextricably bound to his brother Sonny, not only because he is of relation, but because their mother wanted Sonny to be always protected and looked after. The story begins with Sonny...
    930 Words | 3 Pages
  • Sonny's Blues - 1369 Words
    Regina Carbone Dr. Jessica Datema WRT – 201 – 089WB October 20, 2014 The Darkness In Between “Sonny’s Blues” “Sonny’s Blues” is a short story, written by James Baldwin, about two brothers from Harlem, NY. The story is told in the first person perspective by one brother about is younger brother, Sonny. The narrator, who remains unnamed throughout the story, is Sonny’s older brother and no other siblings are mentioned, so it is safe to assume it is only the two of them. The narrator remains...
    1,369 Words | 4 Pages
  • Escaping the Blues - 1553 Words
     Escaping the Blues Reservation Blues begins with the tortured soul of a musician, and his guitar. The blues musician, a reanimated form of the late Robert Johnson, hands his enchanted instrument to Thomas Builds the Fire. This guitar possesses skill, precision and soul, no matter who its owner is. Johnson had given his soul to the Devil in order to acquire these powers. When Thomas was given this guitar, he too felt the music radiating with its strings. This power, compelled Thomas...
    1,553 Words | 4 Pages
  • Funeral Blues. - 1477 Words
    In this poem, the writer uses regular verse and traditional pattern of rhythm and rhyme to give impact to his unexpected imagery of the end of a relationship when he cuts himself off from the rest of the his life because his grief is too much. To describe the incredible pain and isolation of when someone you love leaves you and the way time seems insignificant, the writer starts the poem by reiterating the title, creating emphasis by his use of assonance of the monosyllables: Stop all the...
    1,477 Words | 4 Pages
  • Sonny's blues - 1173 Words
    1 – What statement dos the story make about the relationship of art to life or about the relationship of art to suffering? Sonny’s Blues by James Baldwin is a short story written in 1957. It is a story about Sonny, and his relationship to music, his brother, the narrator and the society he is living in. This story takes place in Harlem, New York, which is known to be a major African-Americans residential and cultural place. It is also known for its poverty and place where drugs are...
    1,173 Words | 3 Pages
  • Blues music - 2560 Words
     Blues Executive Summary The blues music has gone through a massive evolution since it first started out as a musical tradition for the African Americans and their slave culture. Since then we have seen many important improvements and milestones for when it comes to human rights and black music. The end of slave import and the end of segregation lead to black music in the radio among others. It became possible to record and possess music by African Americans with help from record labels...
    2,560 Words | 7 Pages
  • The Weary Blues - 1189 Words
     In the poem "The Weary Blues”, Langston Hughes describes an evening of listening to a blues musician in Harlem. “The Wear Blues” By: Langston Hughes Droning a drowsy syncopated tune, Rocking back and forth to a mellow croon, I heard a Negro play. Down on Lenox Avenue the other night By the pale dull pallor of an old gas light He did a lazy sway . . . He did a lazy sway . . . To the tune o' those Weary Blues. With his ebony hands on each ivory key He made that poor...
    1,189 Words | 4 Pages
  • Blues and Music - 480 Words
    Week 5 – Assignment Good day everyone, my name is Olea Jean and I will be your facilitator in today's discussion concerning the Influence of Music in our culture an values today. To begin let's start off with an overview of our discussion points for today which will include: (1) Music and radio – the ways they have shaped American Culture and it's value. (2) How music and a particular genre has personally affected me and those close to me. (3) How music has shaped cultural and social...
    480 Words | 2 Pages
  • Sonny’s Blues - 346 Words
    James Baldwin’s short story “Sonny’s Blues” exemplifies suffering as the major theme depicted through the struggle of two brothers as they try to understand one another. Baldwin’s underlying message deals with the hardships that African-Americans endured through the mid twentieth century, a time when race determined your status in society. The brothers appear to be completely different people throughout the story but nearing its end, Sonny’s brother finally begins to understand Sonny’s...
    346 Words | 1 Page
  • Refugee Blues - 453 Words
    Positive Image | Negative Image | Effect | Some are living in mansions | Some are living in holes | This shows that while some people are very well off, others, like the refugees, have nowhere decent to live. | Evert spring it blossoms a new | Old passports cant do that | A tree can grow but a passport cant | Saw a poodle in a jacket fastened with a pin | But they weren’t German Jews my dear | Saying how pets get more luxuries then them | Saw fish swimming as if they were free | Only ten...
    453 Words | 2 Pages
  • Rhythm and Blues - 418 Words
    Rhythm and Blues What is Rhythm and Blues? Rhythm and Blues, or R and B, can be used to describe the stylish urban music that grew out of the urbanization of the blues. It is a form of popular music based on a mixture of blues and black folk music. Its melody is simple, but has strong repetitious rhythms. It has been influenced by jazz, jump music, as well as by black gospel music. R and B got its roots from the blues, and took upon some of the blues principles such as, the...
    418 Words | 1 Page
  • The Weary Blues - 1509 Words
    In Langston Hughes’s poem titled “The Weary Blues”, the speaker describes an evening spent listening to a blues musician in Lenox Avenue, Harlem. With the help of certain poetic and acoustic techniques, the poem manages to evoke the same lamenting and woeful tone and mood of blues music. This essay will be a critical appreciation of this poem in which I will discuss it in the context of the Harlem Renaissance as well as examine how the Blues music functions as a means of articulating personal...
    1,509 Words | 4 Pages
  • Sonny's Blues - 1256 Words
    Sonny's Blues A captivating tale of a relationship between two troubling brothers in Harlem, "Sonny's Blues" is told from the perception of Sonny's brother, whose name is never mentioned. Baldwin's choice of Sonny's brother as a narrator is what makes "Sonny's Blues" significant in terms of illustrating the relationship and emotional complications of Sonny and his brother. The significance of "Sonny's Blues" lies in the way Sonny's brother describes their relationship based on what he...
    1,256 Words | 3 Pages
  • Sonny's Blues - 308 Words
    "Sonny's Blues" was first published in a mainstream magazine in 1957 and was collected in Baldwin's 1965 book "Going To Meet The Man". Sonny's Blues" is a short story set in the ghetto of Harlem, NY. James Baldwin wrote "Sonny's Blues" to articulate how the African-American culture enabled countless numbers of Blacks to escape, survive, endure and overcome various types of institutionalized racism and accompanying forms of social, economical and political oppression. African-American culture...
    308 Words | 1 Page
  • The History of Blues - 783 Words
    The History of The Blues by Adam Keane While blues lyrics often deal with personal adversity, the music itself goes far beyond self-pity. The blues is also about overcoming hard luck, saying what you feel, ridding yourself of frustration, letting your hair down, and simply having fun. The best blues is visceral, cathartic, and starkly emotional. From unbridled joy to deep sadness, no form of music communicates more genuine emotion. The blues has deep roots in American history,...
    783 Words | 3 Pages
  • Sonny Blues - 1477 Words
    Kellon Meighoo Sharon Ballentine English 1302-304 25 March, 2011 Sonny’s Blues Essay Blues is a genre of music that usually speaks about depression. This was the type of music that almost led to a man’s downfall. Sonny is this man who loves this music from ever since he was a young man. His love for this music added to Sonny’s influence on drugs. His only brother lacks the support that he needs and this was the start of a destructive relationship between the two brothers. There was no...
    1,477 Words | 4 Pages
  • Sonny's Blues - 1521 Words
    How does Baldwin's real-life experience connect to his short story, "Sonny's Blues"? The writer was a poor boy growing up. He was also a Negro, so things were bad for him and his family in white America. He probably felt sad every day of his childhood so he turned to books for entertainment and maybe escape. When he started reading, he found that he liked it and wanted to create stories for other people to enjoy, but he was a poor Negro boy who could not expect help from the whites, so he...
    1,521 Words | 5 Pages
  • Ragtime and Blues - 911 Words
     Ragtime and Blues Ragtime and Blues are the two music styles that give Jazz her name and life. Ragtime and blues, which are generated and rose into popularity at mostly the same time of period, are usually considered as closely connected because of Jazz and yet are very distinctive music styles. They affect Jazz in different perspectives, such as Ragtime in the usage of syncopation, the swing feeling, and Blues in the composition form, the improvisation, and the...
    911 Words | 3 Pages
  • Blues and Jazz Influence Paper
    The Influence of 1920 Blues and Jazz on Modern Music Mark Carter The Influence of 1920 Blues and Jazz on Modern Music This paper is will try to show how the music that started with singing of old songs by the slaves to influences the music that the world listens to today. Shaping the music of Rock and Roll, Country and Western, and Easy Listening that influences every aspect of society’s everyday life are Blues and Jazz. In an interview many years ago on television, heard by...
    1,698 Words | 5 Pages
  • The Function of Music in Reservation Blues
    The Function of Music in Reservation Blues Definition Popular Music: Popular music is music belonging to any of a number of musical styles that are accessible to the general public and are disseminated by one or more of the mass media. Popular Music In General: - the music since industrialization in the 1800's that is most in line with the tastes and interests of people à extremely wide range of music from vaudeville and minstrel shows to heavy metal - abbreviated to...
    584 Words | 3 Pages
  • 3 O'Clock Blues Analysis
    “3 O’Clock Blues”, as performed by BB King An analysis BB King is undoubtedly one of the greatest blues musicians, and an equally unparalleled pioneer of guitar music. Brought up in the midst of poverty, strife, and struggle of the rural Mississippi Delta, King experienced great hardships from a young age, and used this as a source of inspiration for much of his later music (King & Ritz, 1996). King’s celebrated music career emerged from very modest beginnings. At the age of 18, King...
    1,071 Words | 4 Pages
  • Blues Music and Its Influence on Integration
    Sarah Anne Stevenson Dave Stockum English Language and Comprehension 20 November 1999 Blues Music and its influence on integration From years 1505 to 1870, the world underwent the largest forced migration in history: West Africa was soon to be convulsed by the arrival of Europeans and become the advent of the transatlantic slave trade. Ships from Europe, bound for America, appeared on the horizon, and their captains and sailors-carrying muskets, swords, and shackles-landed on the coast,...
    3,513 Words | 9 Pages
  • True Meaning of Rhythm and Blues
    The True Meaning of Rhythm and Blues I was born with music inside me. Music was one of my parts. Like my ribs, my kidneys, my liver, my heart, [sic} Like my blood. It was a force already within me when I arrived on the scene. It was a necessity for me-like [sic] or water. - Ray Charles Rhythm and blues has become an original heartbeat of America. People love the sound. The term "rhythm and blues" emerged as the most acceptable designation for the music that...
    772 Words | 2 Pages
  • “Sonny’s Blues” The Use of Symbolism
    “Sonny’s Blues” The Use of Symbolism In order to understand the use of symbolism in James Baldwin’s short story “Sonny’s Blues” the setting and the time period in which the story was written must carefully be looked over. “Sonny’s Blues” takes place in Harlem, New York during the early 1950s.This is a desolated place; people are suffering from poverty, African American population is peaking, prostitutes are walking the streets and drugs are being traded on every street corner. The audience is...
    804 Words | 2 Pages
  • Sonnys blues literary analysis
    Jane-Clare Dauito Professor Thorstensen English Composition 2 11 December 2013 Within The Blues James Baldwin’s “Sonny’s Blues” is a story of how a distant and conflicting relationship between two brothers is saved by the powerful message within music. In “Sonny’s Blues” the music portrays a very powerful message. The story begins with Sonny being arrested for heroin use. Sonny’s older brother is a school teacher and did not want to believe that the news was true, “I didn’t want to believe...
    2,558 Words | 7 Pages
  • Lady Sings the Blues - 1430 Words
    LADY SINGS THE BLUES What is a song but a poem set to music? Take away the music from a good song and the rhythm of the words will create its own musical sound. "Songs For a Colored Singer", a poem written by Elizabeth Bishop, is a song without the music. Bishop's use of repetitive rhymes creates the lyrical, song like, structure to her poem. The voice of the song belongs to a black woman who encounters adversity throughout the poem. The sum of the elements, a black woman singing about hard...
    1,430 Words | 4 Pages
  • Difference Between Ragtime and Blues
    Ragtime and blues are the foundations of jazz. Both were initially very popular among African Americans as jazz came from an African background. The blues contain the musical structure of jazz with the 12 bar pattern, while ragtime supplies the unique syncopations and improvisations. The early musicians of blues and ragtime would eventually provide the transition necessary to move into jazz. Blues contained the four-note structure, which is also the building block of jazz music. “Further the...
    1,203 Words | 2 Pages
  • 1920's Blues - 668 Words
    In the 1920’s blue’s classic Ain’t no tellin’, blues artist Mississippi John Hurt displays his situation detailing what maybe perhaps his life on the road as a blues artist travelling and performing at different venues throughout a few parts of the country. In attempts to decipher the lyrics, I imagined myself in the 1920’s going through rough times perhaps even being slaved but then gaining an opportunity to travel on the road and perform. Personally because I would feel ever so wanderlust...
    668 Words | 2 Pages
  • Bruce Springsteen and The Blues - 496 Words
     The genre of music “blues” has been one that’s withstood the test of time. Blues music is unique in the sense that one truly needs to feel “blue”, or down to sing/write a song. That is why this music has withstood the test of time, because no matter what time period or generation is making this music, one is always going to fall on hard times and be able to relate to this type of music. A genre that was born out of the aftermath of slavery is obviously going to carry with it a powerful...
    496 Words | 2 Pages
  • St. Louis Blues - 793 Words
    Listening Analysis Paper Alex Kosarko MUS 185, Summer 2009 For my listening assignment, I chose the piece, “St. Louis Blues” by Bessie Smith and Louis Armstrong, recorded in the late 1920s. At this time, the country was in the transition from country blues (a single artist accompanied by a single guitar) to city blues (a single artist accompanied by either a piano and/or several instruments). In city blues, the form was based on a very rigid 12-bar blues structure, which used mainly...
    793 Words | 3 Pages
  • Comparing Modern Songs to Blues
    InArt #2 Paper #2 Song Choices: “Dreaming With a Broken Heart” by John Mayer “’I Feel Like Dying” by Lil’ Wayne “Grace is Gone” by the Dave Matthews Band “Story of a girl” by Matchbook Romance The four songs that I chose for this paper are all composed by new artists that have arrived on the music scene well after the blues era ended. Obviously these songs are not a direct result of the blues era. However, I think that each of them embodies the core qualities of blues music. I...
    843 Words | 2 Pages
  • Chicago Blues Artists Research
    Chicago Blues Final Assignment 1. WC Handy - Memphis Blues Written in 1909 and self-published in 1912, originally written for a Memphis mayoral campaign. It introduced the style of 12-bar blues and inspired the foxtrot dance by New York-based dance team Vernon and Irene Castle. Handy first published it as an instrumental, and then sold it to music publisher Theron Bennett. It is particularly notable as it is sometimes considered to be the first blues song. 2. Blind Lemon Jefferson -...
    1,303 Words | 4 Pages
  • Ragtime and Blues Influence on Jazz
    Ara Cho Ethno 50A 803-672-412 October 14, 2011 Seeing Ragtime and Blues as Parents of Jazz Jazz is a music genre that has complex characteristics and history of development and thus many musicians and scholars face troubles in defining what jazz is. In general, jazz is believed to have born in New Orleans. Jazz developed for the pleasure of the social dancers. According to the “Understanding Jazz: What Is Jazz?” of John F. Kennedy center for the Performing Arts, Jazz was created mainly...
    1,375 Words | 4 Pages
  • Sonnys Blues Themes - 1122 Words
    Gracie Ferraco English 114- section 03 Schwartz March 14, 2013 Prompt # 2, Essay # 3 In Sonny’s Blues the theme, symbols, characters, and motifs all combine together to create a literary masterpiece that describes the importance of unity amongst family and the turbulent life of African-Americans living in Harlem, New York in the 1950’s. This story is written in a chronological thought process of experiences the narrator has seen while growing up and the memories of his...
    1,122 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Weary Blues and Lenox Avenue: Midnight
    "The Weary Blues" and "Lenox Avenue: Midnight" by Langston Hughes are two poems written as scenes of urban life. Although these poems were written more than seventy years ago, it is surprising to see some general similarities they share with modern day city life. Dilluted down with word play and irrelevant lines such as "And the gods are laughing at us.", the underlying theme is evidently urban life. "The Weary Blues" and "Lenox Avenue: Midnight" approach the general topic of urban life from...
    388 Words | 1 Page
  • The History of Blues and Rock 'N' Roll
    Blues vs. Rock and Roll “You can’t play the blues, until you’ve paid your dues” (Spencer 41), said by the originator of the blues W.C. Handy. The blues is a music style that influenced America in many ways eventually coming to create rock and roll. The true originators of the blues go back to African slaves brought to America to work on plantations. As these slaves gained freedom and acceptance in the big cities blues developed its own unique style. This unique style gained popularity amongst...
    2,958 Words | 7 Pages
  • Literary Technique Analysis for "The Weary Blues"
    Zakary Houtrides Professor Snowberger English Composition 2 15 May 2013 Literary Technique Poem Analysis The imagery in Langston Hughes’ poem “The Weary Blues” explains the theme of dejection and the relief that music can bring. In the first line the words droning and drowsy appear, immediately reflecting the tone of tiredness first stated in the poem’s title. These two words, droning and drowsy, describe the blues, the type of music the narrator is hearing. Hughes’ imagery is further...
    885 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Effects of Blues Music on Civil Rights
    Blues Music | Influences on Civil Rights in the United States | Addy Phillips | Eddie James “Son” House, Jr., an American blues singer and guitarist once stated, "People keep asking me where the blues started and all I can say is that when I was a boy we always was singing in the fields. Not real singing, you know, just hollerin', but we made up our songs about things that was happening to us at the time, and I think that's where the blues started (Cohn, 1993).” House, living...
    2,439 Words | 6 Pages
  • Bessie Smith and St. Louie Blues
    St. Louis Blues Bessie Smith and St. Louis Blues are two legends in the blues world, separately as well as together. When placed together one could not find a better example of classical blues from the 1920's. St. Louis Blues is one of the most popular blues songs ever written. William Christopher Hardy wrote this song over 80 years ago. While on a trip to St. Louis, Hardy met a tormented black woman. She spoke to him in her deep southern broken English about the loss of her husband to...
    420 Words | 2 Pages
  • Point of View and Symbolism in Sonny's Blues
    Point of View and Symbolism in “Sonny’s Blues” The story “Sonny’s Blues” by James Baldwin makes excellent use of multiple literary elements. Namely, I think the writer utilizes symbolism and the nuances of point of view to give the story a deeper connotation that could not be said plainly. The meat of the story is about an unnamed older brother’s relationship and differences with his younger brother, Sonny. Sonny’s aspiration to become a jazz pianist leads him in an opposite direction than his...
    1,558 Words | 4 Pages
  • Disabled and Refugee Blues, contrast and compare experiences
    Disabled and Refugee Blues, written by Wilfred Owen and W.H. Auden respectively, are both responses to exile and isolation and a cry for those who are suffering from them. Disabled, written in 1917, was a response to the isolation caused by disability and especially that of war veterans. Auden’s, Refugee Blues, written in 1939 on the outbreak of the Second World War, was criticism of the widespread discrimination of Jews in Europe and more specifically German Jews by the Nazis. A key difference...
    3,085 Words | 8 Pages
  • Sonny's Blues by James Baldwin, a Narrative View
    Each story has a protagonist, the main character, the one that seems to have the attention focused on them. Then there's usually an antagonist, the opposite of the protagonist, the so- called "bad apple" in the family. It seems to be that way with the modern family we see today. "Sonny's Blues" is mainly of an older brother who only wants to see the best for his youngest brother, Sonny. Coming from a middle-class family, things that happen to Sonny aren't what the brother though would come...
    856 Words | 2 Pages
  • A compare and contrast essay on blues and gospel music
    Have you ever gone out on Saturday night to hear someone sing the blues? Have you ever gone to a Baptist church the next morning and heard a joyful gospel song? You may think the two musical expressions have nothing in common, but if you listen closely and study their histories, you will find some surprising similarities. When you first hear gospel music and the blues, you can't help noticing how different they are in mood and in the stories they tell. Blues songs are sad, full of heartbreak...
    393 Words | 2 Pages
  • Journalistic Article on Kind of Blue- Miles Davis
    KIND OF BLUE – ALBUM REVIEW ‘Kind of Blue’ was released in 1959. This release can be described as the cornerstone of jazz music. Having sold over 20 million copies, it has gone on to influence generations of musicians to come. Even to this day it is currently selling 5000 copies per week. It is nothing short of a masterpiece and these six tracks of brilliant improvisation will leave you in a better mood by the end of it. Through the modal sketches of Davis, this album takes you on a...
    759 Words | 2 Pages
  • Blues, Jazz and the early Civil Rights Movement
    While a wide range of art forms were associated with the Civil Rights movement, music certainly had the most impact on its early stages as it was a medium by which many, namely those being oppressed, could express their disdain for the status quo. The musicians involved with the movement came from a mixture of backgrounds and the music served as a source of empowerment for those who shared similar sentiments with those performing it. Being that jazz and blues were popular genres during that...
    592 Words | 2 Pages
  • Literary Analysis of James Baldwin’s Sonny’s Blues
    Fictional writing is generally done just to entertain readers. Some authors create stories with a singular point of view, while others introduce more complex plots and storylines. When it comes to author James Baldwin’s short story Sonny’s Blues, there is much depth given to the storyline and the characters. Sonny’s Blues has been analyzed by many different people throughout time because the story has many elements. From Baldwin’s skillful use of metaphors and similes to his incorporation of...
    2,329 Words | 6 Pages
  • “Jesus H. Tap-Dancing Christ!” , “the Blues Brothers” Is a Catholic Classic!
    Catharine Renner “Jesus H. Tap-dancing Christ!”, “The Blues Brothers” is a Catholic Classic! “The Blues Brothers” is a unique blend of great music with outrageous humour and over the top manic car chases packaged with cool and a humorous poke at the Catholic Church. Among its fans it has reached cult status where it is routinely honoured by tribute bands all over the world endeavouring to recapture its spirit. At the same time “The Blues Brothers” has outraged some Christians as it...
    3,793 Words | 9 Pages
  • Similarities and Differences between Sonny’s Blues and A Good Man is Hard to Find
    Journal #1 Chao Wu 06/15/2012 The two stories that interest me the most are Sonny’s Blues and A Good Man is Hard to Find. Between Sonny and the Misfit, they both had commons and differences from each other. Since they had different inner emotional distress, this led to a huge difference in their lives. Sonny and the Misfit both had a miserable childhood. Sonny’s father was an alcoholic-addicted man, and they often fought each other. Sonny’s mother died when Sonny was young. Sonny started...
    320 Words | 1 Page
  • History of the Blues; Connection Between the Art and Modern Conscious Hip Hop
    Blues and Conscious Hip Hop Connection Conscious Hip-hop is the modern form of the blues. Both genres of music express the hardships of the African American people in their respective time periods or explain the culture surrounding the artist and/or their community. Through their lyrics, the artists from the two genres are able to spread the culture and experiences of the black race. Elements of the blues are rooted in African culture. The blues is one of the most influential...
    2,671 Words | 7 Pages
  • Bessie Smith - 952 Words
    MUS 205 Mid term Essay Bessie Johnson Kown as the “Empress Of Blues”, Bessie Smith was said to have revolutionized the vocal end of Blues Music. She showed a lot of pride as an independent African-American woman. Her style in performance and lyrics often reflected her lifestyle. Bessie Smith was one of the first female jazz artists, and she paved the way for many musicians who followed. Bessie was born April 15, 1894 in Chattanooga, Tennessee to a part time Baptist preacher, William...
    952 Words | 3 Pages
  • Langston Hughes - 1132 Words
    Compare and contrast blues and jazz poems of Langston Hughes When you’re reading a poem written by Langston Hughes, you can feel his energy. The way he uses his words to describe what he’s writing about is amazing. Many people feel like Langston Hughes is one of the greatest poets of all-time, and I’m one of those people who believe in this. Most of the poems written by Hughes has that blues like feeling in it. There’s no wonder why his poems are always being compared to blues songs. The way he...
    1,132 Words | 3 Pages
  • Robert Johnson - 1093 Words
    Robert Johnson Crossroad Despite his early death and small list of recordings, Robert Johnson is without a doubt one of the most influential musician's of the twentieth century. Among those indebted to his music are: Jimmy Page (Led Zeppelin), Eric Clapton (Cream) and The Rolling Stones. At the root of Robert Johnson's music is a relentless ability to express the deepest rawest emotion with unmistakable honesty, clarity and soul. Robert Johnson expressed his life experience through his...
    1,093 Words | 3 Pages
  • Development of Pop Music Since 1930s
    Development of Pop Music since 1930’s and technological advances Blues music began in the late 1800s when African American slaves worked in the cotton fields. They were not allowed to talk but when the owner of the fields went out they would sing about religion and their lives as slaves. They would perform ‘call and response’ where a slave would be put in charge to sing a line and the rest of the plantation would repeat it or sing the next line. The owner came back to hear them singing and...
    2,685 Words | 7 Pages
  • Rock music - 586 Words
    I Introduction   Rock Music, group of related music styles that have dominated popular music in the West since about 1955. Rock music began in the United States, but it has influenced and in turn been shaped by a broad field of cultures and musical traditions, including gospel music, the blues, country-and-western music, classical music (see Music, Western), folk music, electronic music, and the popular music of Asia, Africa, and Latin America (see Worldbeat). In addition to its use as a...
    586 Words | 2 Pages
  • Music in the 1900's - 1720 Words
    Stephen Mensah Period 6 The topic I will be writing about is Music in the 1900s starting from the beginning and explaining how and why new genre’s emerged from the old ones, to result in the music we know today. My research will be derived of these following books: Letters to a Young Jazz Musician, The ballad of book of john Jacob Niles, and I Hear America Singing. Notes and bibliography Website 1: Enjoy the music.com/history (notes A.) As the 1900's began, the variety of music genre began...
    1,720 Words | 5 Pages
  • Negro Spirituals - 1631 Words
    Negro Spirituals Spirituals, a religious folk song of American origin, particularly associated with African-American Protestants of the southern United States. The African-American spiritual, characterized by syncopation, polyrhythmic structure, and the pentatonic scale of five whole tones, is, above all, a deeply emotional song. Spirituals are really the most characteristic product of the race genius as yet in America. But the very elements which make them uniquely expressive of the Negro make...
    1,631 Words | 4 Pages
  • Hip Hop vs. Rock
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  • Role of Music in Social Change
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  • The Power of Music - 1357 Words
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  • African American Oral Tradition
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  • Pop Music - 418 Words
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  • Music Appreciation - 561 Words
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  • Harelm Renaissance ( Coleman Hawkins)
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  • Reflection - 364 Words
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  • Complete Jamey Aebersold Jazz Play-a-Long Book Index -
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  • Eric Clapton - 794 Words
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  • Profile Essay - 947 Words
    Composition #2: Describing Howard “Sundanze” Dunston is one of those suave smooth talking blues musicians, like in the movies from the 1920’s where people would go to juke joints and speakeasies for a good time. When he speaks, words flow from his lips like a melody, in a low husky tone, drawing his listeners in for more. Danze is a tall lean black man in his early 60’s with a smooth milk chocolate complexion, a shinny bald head that he always has a blue bandana wrapped around, and a full...
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  • Ethel Waters - 1697 Words
    With all that Ethel Waters has contributed to music and film, it is surprising that she is often forgotten. She was a talented blues singer whose unique style distinguished her from other blues singers and she was a jazz vocalist as well. Her talent extended beyond singing, when she became a dramatic actress who earned award nominations for her performances. What was most remarkable about Waters' performances was how she reconstructed the mammy character into one that challenged stereotypes....
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  • Jazz Concert Review - 932 Words
    Jazz Concert Review [pic] The first formal small jazz concert was held at the Maum Café on Sep. 25th, 2008. There were many music performances have held at the Maum Café but Zino Park, leader of the band, and manager of Maum Café agreed to arrange a formal jazz concert for the first time. The main theme of this concert was “Smooth Jazz with Zino Park at Maum”. Before the concert began, the band members introduced themselves to the audience. The names of players were: Acoustic...
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  • Mississippi River Flood of 1927
    8/27/2012 MUS 107 The Great Mississippi River Flood of 1927 The Great Flood of 1927 had a major effect on African American culture and music. Specifically the Mississippi Delta blues. The blues is a genre of music created by African American communities of the deep south at the end of the 19th century. The blues consist of themes such as; relationships, emotions, work, sex, problems, travel, and life. There are more, but these are the most common themes of blues music. The Mississippi River...
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  • Music Manipulation - 335 Words
    I feel that a CD player is a manipulative device. There are many ways a CD player can manipulate, but I have chosen to talk about three specific methods. The first method is the commercial success of the artist. If an artist has found popularity or a lot of recognition a person may think its cool to feel the way the artist does about certain things. A person may change their fashion or anything to show they want to be as cool as the artist is or has as much popularity as the artist is. These...
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  • Chuck Berry - 870 Words
    Chuck Berry’s career is one full of power, hope, rock and roll, sex, and despair. All of these attributes go hand in hand with a real musician. Chuck’s early life was rare for most afro American men in the 1940’s. He was middle class; his mother was a principal and his father was a contractor and a deacon for a community church in St. Louis. With this type of upbringing it allowed him to persue music. However, with all this it did not prevent him from getting into trouble, while he was still in...
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  • Great Rock Musicians: Their Achievements and Effect on Rock and Roll
    Great Rock Musicians: Their Achievements and Effect on Rock and Roll The blues are undeniably the roots of early rock and roll. Rock today has mutated so much that the basic blues patterns have been all but lost. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the birth of, and evolution of rock and roll by focusing on three of the arguably greatest rock musicians of the sixties and seventies. The origin of the blues can be traced to the emancipation of the slaves in the rural black areas of...
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  • The Life and Lasting Influence of Bessie Smith:
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  • Blind Lemon and Ray Charles
    Blind Lemon and Ray Charles It’s hard to sum up all the magnificent work that Ray Charles and Blind Lemon Jefferson have produced. Each with their own unique styles have greatly influenced the genre of blues and have touched the hearts of many; both overcoming difficult obstacles such as blindness. Blind Lemon Jefferson was born blind whereas Ray Charles started to lose his eye sight at 5 and later became completely blind at the age of 7 due to glaucoma. Blind Lemon was born on...
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  • Bio on Bessie Smith - 999 Words
    Bessie Smith was a rough, crude, violent woman. She was also the greatest of the classic Blues singers of the 1920s. Bessie started out as a street musician in Chattanooga. In 1912 Bessie joined a traveling show as a dancer and singer. The show featured Pa and Ma Rainey, and Smith developed a friendship with Ma. Ma Rainey was Bessie's mentor and she stayed with her show until 1915. Bessie then joined the T.O.B.A. vaudeville circuit and gradually built up her own following in the south and along...
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  • My Favorite Music Is R
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    Parth Sanghavi Rock n Roll and its celebrities influenced fans which led to a change in American culture during 1950 and 1970. Rock n Roll or often called as “Rock & Roll” or “Rock ‘n’ Roll” is genre of very popular music that originated in the United States of America in the middle of the twentieth century. It is a combination of many African-American genres like as blues, jump blues, jazz, and gospel music,[3] together with Western swing and country music. It is characterized by...
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  • Poop - 5324 Words
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  • Rrrrrrrrr - 3035 Words
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  • Music Through the Ages - 1200 Words
    Doo - wop After the huge popularity of swing music and the big bands that were associated with this genre, America’s economics changed meaning the artists could no longer afford to support the large amount of musicians they had in their bands. This led many swing bands to simplify their sound. Until this point the band and bandleader had been the focus point to the audience, and although the singer was still important, they were not considered to be the ‘title’ of the artist itself. As bands...
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  • Intro to Jazz Study Guide
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  • Southern Folk Music - 5679 Words
    Southern Folk Music and Race Relations Abstract Introduction The growth of the American folk music reservoir is a process that counterparts the historical and cultural development of American society. In the formation of this reservoir, two major streams, British, African, and several smaller branches, e.g., German, French, Cajun Mexican, etc., flowed together over a two-century period (Malone, 1979:4). Alan Lomax, one of folk music's leading historians, has detected that the merging...
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  • Bessie Smith Analysis - 1246 Words
    BESSIE SMITH 1894 – 1937 Bessie Smith, known as “Empress of the Blues”, was born on April 15 1894 in Chattanooga, Tennessee. She was one of seven children to a part-time Baptist preacher and his wife. However, by the time Bessie was nine years old both of her parents were dead. Bessie and her brother Andrew were already singing on the streets of Chattanooga for spare change. Bessie’s older brother Clarence had joined a travelling vaudeville1 show as a comedian and dancer and in 1912 he...
    1,246 Words | 4 Pages
  • Evolution of Folk Music - 2873 Words
    The Evolution of Folk Music Almost all of the music that we hear today can be traced back in one way or another to folk music. The evolution of folk music is rich in history and it is easy to see how the current events and the times created the changes that were to occur. Folk music got its roots from Anglo-American Folk Music and later evolved into what was known as the blues and continues to influence much of the music that is written to this day. Many artists have had major impacts on the...
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  • Introduction to Zydeco Music - 607 Words
    Jamarcus Burks October 15, 2012 A fiddle, accordion, guitar, and a washboard are all you need to create the sweet sound of Zydeco. Zydeco music is a mixture of Blues or Jazz music with an upbeat tempo. Zydeco music has grown with my family. It is like a china dish your great grandmother passes down. The music is unique from the message it sends to the crazy two stepping dance that goes along with it. Zydeco music plays a significant role in my life. The first time I heard Zydeco music, I...
    607 Words | 2 Pages
  • History of African American Music
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  • Rock History and Culture end Questions
    Joe Smith Rock History and Culture Chapter Two Questions 8/23/2013 Rock History and Culture End Questions At the end of chapter two, a chapter in which the genre of blues evolved into the sub genres of urban blues and rhythm and blues, we are asked compare the two songs in terms of lyrics tempo and feel. BB King’s “Three O’clock Blues” sounds much more like blues than Bo Diddley’s “Bo Diddley” which could be described more as rhythm and blues because it utilizes more than one singer...
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  • Slavery and Music - 1458 Words
    Without slavery, music would not sound the same. Discuss. The blues is the music made by slaves. It was the first type of music, and it was created by normal people when they were forced into slavery many centuries ago. When more than 12 million African slaves were taken over to America countries to work they used to have everything taken away from them. Their rights, their names and their possessions were all stripped from them. However the one thing slave owners could not take away from...
    1,458 Words | 4 Pages
  • How Was the First Rock and Roll Song
    It is hard to decipher when and who started the rock and roll revolution. Most would say Elvis and others might disagree. Rock and roll to me is as the words sound, but written into lyrics of a song. Rock is an object that is hard and its shaped in many different was. Roll metaphorically speaking is ever going, like a ball rounding down the hill, which needs friction to continue rolling on. Songs with a strong vocal edge and hard-hitting musical instruments are what make rock and roll different...
    307 Words | 1 Page
  • The Social and Political Context of the 1950's Is Crucial to Any Understanding of the Birth of Rock N Roll
    The social and political context of the 1950's is crucial to any understanding of the birth of rock n roll. "Rock was formed out of the social, economic and political context of post-war America". The social context was on the bases of the post war baby boom, which counted for the birth of 77 million babies between the years 1946-1964. By the year 1964 forty percent of America's population was under twenty years of age. For the first time both middle and working class youths were acquiring an...
    843 Words | 2 Pages
  • Improve my writing skills
    Group 4: Music ( lan, vân, thảo, hoàng, chi, my, hương) Topic: Most famous music curses of all the time The “Gloomy Sunday” Curse "Gloomy Sunday" was a song written by Rezso Seress, a Hungarian composer . The break-up with his girlfriend in 1933 left him such depression that he wrote this obsessive sorrowful melody. A few months after Gloomy Sunday's coming-ouut, a record label agreed to buy " the dead song" and published it in many big cites in the world. However, Seress turned out to be a...
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  • Music - 1383 Words
    I had never listened a outside life concert before, so it was the first time I went to outside to enjoy a life concert last Friday. I was very exicted because I never have opportunity to enjoy a outside life concert before and I have no idea about how it works, so I think it is very mystiftication. The style of this concert is Jazz, and there are six main instruments of this concert, including, drum, saxphone, trumpet, piano, trombone and violoncello. These six instruments combine together and...
    1,383 Words | 4 Pages

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