Amino acid Essays & Research Papers

Best Amino acid Essays

  • Amino Acids - 570 Words
    Lesson Learning Outcomes Upon completion of this lecture, students should be able to: understand the structures and properties of amino acids know the groups of amino acid What are amino acids? Amino acids are molecules that when combined with each other  proteins. Amino acids contain a central tetrahedral carbon atom (α-carbon) amine group, carboxyl group, R-side chain The R-side chain determines the different amino acids There are 20 common amino acids Amino acids can join via...
    570 Words | 5 Pages
  • Amino acids - 618 Words
    AMINO ACIDS SUSMITA DAS SWAPNA MONDAL OBJECTIVES  To study about Amino acids.  To study the classifications of amino acids based on different headings.  To study the functions of amino acids. INTRODUCTION  Amino acids:• Amino acids are monomers of protein. • Amino acids are group of organic compounds which contain two functional groups. One is Amino group(NH2) and the other is Carboxyl group(COOH). • Proteins are broken down into amino acids on hydrolysis. • Each amino acid also have a...
    618 Words | 4 Pages
  • Amino Acids - 2249 Words
    Separation of Amino Acids by Paper Chromatography Chromatography is a common technique for separating chemical substances. The prefix “chroma,” which suggests “color,” comes from the fact that some of the earliest applications of chromatography were to separate components of the green pigment, chlorophyll. You may have already used this method to separate the colored components in ink. In this experiment you will use chromatography to separate and identify amino acids, the building blocks of...
    2,249 Words | 7 Pages
  • Amino Acids - 1944 Words
    Amino Acids Glycine is the smallest of the amino acids. It is ambivalent, meaning that it can be inside or outside of the protein molecule. In aqueous solution at or near neutral pH, glycine will exist predominantly as the zwitterion. Alanine is a hydrophobic molecule. It is ambivalent, meaning that it can be inside or outside of the protein molecule. The α carbon of alanine is optically active; in proteins, only the L-isomer is found. Serine differs from alanine in that one of the methylenic...
    1,944 Words | 5 Pages
  • All Amino acid Essays

  • Amino Acids - 677 Words
    Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins. Amino acids bind together to form polypeptide chains, and these polypeptides fold and coil together into specific conformations to form proteins. There are 20 different amino acids, each amino acid consisting of four distinct partners. The first is a carboxyl group. A carboxyl group has very weak acids that are able to donate hydrogen ions to biological reactions. The second partner is the amino acid group. Amino acid groups act as the base which,...
    677 Words | 2 Pages
  • Amino Acids - 596 Words
    The Twenty Amino Acids The twenty amino acids (that make up proteins)each have assigned to them both three-letter (can be upper or lower case) and one-letter codes (upper case). This makes it quicker and easier for notation purposes and are worth learning. The following list gives these notations along with hypertext references to download amino acid gif images and also interactive molecules. The format of the list is: amino acid name - 3 letter code - 1 letter code (reference to gif image,...
    596 Words | 2 Pages
  • Amino Acid Chromatography - 1299 Words
    Abstract In this experiment paper chromatography was used in order to identify two unknown amino acids using eight known amino ones. The two unknown ones were identified by comparing the distance they travelled up the chromatography paper and their Rf values to the corresponding values of the other eight known amino acids. The unknown amino acids identified were Glycine and Methionine. Introduction Proteins in cells are important in many ways. There are different types of proteins such...
    1,299 Words | 5 Pages
  • Amino Acids And Peptides PS
    CH 600 Lc PROBLEM SET AMINO ACIDS AND PEPTIDES 1. How do D-amino acids differ from L-amino acids? What biological roles are played by peptides that contain D-amino acids? 2. For each of the following, name an amino acid in which the R group contains it: a hydroxyl group, a sulfur atom, a second chiral carbon atom, an amino group, an amide group, an acid group, an aromatic ring, and a branched side chain. 3. Predict the predominant ionized forms of the following amino acids at pH 7: glutamic...
    298 Words | 1 Page
  • Fractionation of Amino Acid - 590 Words
    Result: Part A: Table 1: Fractionation of amino acid Fraction No | Response to Ninhydrin test(level of blue colour change) | Response to Sakaguchi test (colour change) | 1 | X | yellow | 2 | Dark blue | yellow | 3 | Dark blue | Pale orange | 4 | Blue | Pale orange | 5 | Pale blue | Pale orange | 6 | Blue | Pale orange | 7 | Pale blue | Pale orange | Discussion Part A In the separation and purification of a single protein or amino acids, a solution containing the...
    590 Words | 2 Pages
  • Production of L Amino Acids
    CHM 3730 Production of L-amino acids. Student ID - 10254792 - Kelly Debono α-amino acids are important biological molecules, they are the building blocks of proteins and the 20 L-amino acids are ubiquitous to all living organisms on earth. α-amino acids can exist in D and L form, although the majority are naturally L-amino acids. Both the natural and non-natural amino acids have many uses in organic chemistry as chiral starting materials for natural product total synthesis, as chiral...
    1,750 Words | 5 Pages
  • Amino Acid Metabolism - 1664 Words
    Introduction All tissues have some capability for synthesis of the non-essential amino acids, amino acid remodeling, and conversion of non-amino acid carbon skeletons into amino acids and other derivatives that contain nitrogen. However, the liver is the major site of nitrogen metabolism in the body. In times of dietary surplus, the potentially toxic nitrogen of amino acids is eliminated via transaminations, deamination, and urea formation; the carbon skeletons are generally conserved as...
    1,664 Words | 6 Pages
  • Characteristics and Properties of Amino Acids
     Characteristics and Properties of Amino Acids Introduction: Each amino acid has at least one amine and one acid functional group as the name implies. The different properties result from variations in the structures of different R groups. The R group is often referred to as the amino acid side chain. Amino acids have special common names, however, a three letter abbreviation for the name is used most of the time. A second abbreviation , single letter, is used in long protein...
    5,745 Words | 22 Pages
  • Amino Acids Essay 2
    Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins. They band together in chains to form the stuff from which your life is born. Think of amino acids as Legos for your life. It's a two-step process: Amino acids get together and form peptides or polypeptides. It is from these groupings that proteins are made. And there's not just one kind of amino acid. A total of 20 different kinds of amino acids form proteins. The kinds of amino acids determine the shape of the proteins formed. Commonly...
    320 Words | 1 Page
  • Identify an Amino Acid - 529 Words
    Introduction Proteins are very important to the diet of all animals because they are essential for the function of all cellular activity (Baldwin, 2003). Catalyzing chemical reactions in the body, providing storage and transport as well as antibodies for our immune system are just a few of the many vital roles of proteins. Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins and there are twenty amino acids utilized by biological life (Baldwin,...
    529 Words | 2 Pages
  • Amino Acids Review - 346 Words
    Alanine (ala, A) (neutral, non-polar) Arginine (arg, R) (basic, polar) Asparagine (asn, N) (neutral, polar) Aspartic Acid (asp, D) (acidic, polar) Cysteine (cys, C) (neutral, slightly polar) Glutamic Acid (glu, E) (acidic, polar) Glutamine (gln, Q) (neutral, polar) Glycine (gly, G) (neutral, non-polar) Histidine (his, H) (basic, polar) Isoleucine (ile, I) (neutral, non-polar) Leucine (leu, L) (neutral, non-polar) Lysine (lys, K) (basic, polar) Methionine (met,...
    346 Words | 3 Pages
  • Amino Acids Proteins - 1110 Words
    Amino Acids and Proteins 3-D Structure of Myoglobin Importance of Proteins • Main catalysts in biochemistry: enzymes (involved in virtually every biochemical reaction) • Structural components of cells (both inside and outside of cells in tissues) • Regulatory functions (if/when a cell divides, which genes are expressed, etc.) • Carrier and transport functions (ions, small molecules) Levels of Protein Structure • Primary Structure - amino acid sequence in a polypeptide • Secondary Structure...
    1,110 Words | 16 Pages
  • Electrophoresis of Amino Acids - 773 Words
    Electrophoresis of Amino Acids Introduction: Electrophoresis is a separation technique based on the movement of charged ions under the influence of an electrical field. This technique is primarily used for the separation of amino acids and peptides on the basis of their charge. All amino acids contain ionizable groups that cause the amino acids, in solution, to act as charged polyelectrolytes that can migrate in an electric field. The amino acids with a net positive charge will migrate...
    773 Words | 4 Pages
  • Identification of Amino Acids - 1148 Words
    IDENTIFICATION OF AMINO ACIDS BY MEANS OF TITRATION CURVE ABSTRACT The aim of the experiment was to identify an unknown amino acid through acid-base titrations which was prepared in water to form an acidic solution. Each group prepared unknown amino acid hydrochloride. The pre-prepared basic solution was slowly added to the amino acid solution and pH change was closely observed using the pH meter. During these titrations the amino acid converted from cation to zwitterion to anion; zwitterion...
    1,148 Words | 5 Pages
  • Fish Amino Acid Fertilizer
    Foreign References:JP0180982 September, 1985 71/16 JP63260885 October, 1988 JP4182377 June, 1992 TW183699 May, 1992 Other References:CA 94(7):46144u, Natural Fertilizer Composition Hamaoka, 1980. Primary Examiner:Lander, Ferris Attorney, Agent or Firm:Young & Thompson Claims:What is claimed is: 1. A method of producing an organic fertilizer by using fish, said method comprising the steps of preparing a raw material containing more than 80% of fish heads, boiling the...
    4,958 Words | 17 Pages
  • Titration Curve of Amino Acids
    tion Experiment 1 Titration curves of amino acids General structure of amino acids (amphoteric type): Zwitter ion C * : α- carbon : α- amino acid NH2 : α- amino group, basic (proton acceptor) COOH : α- carboxylic group, acidic (proton donor) R : side chain of amino acid Classification of amino acids depending on the...
    471 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Effect of the Essential Amino Acids on Athletes
    By: Jayquan S Salmond Out of all the amino acids, 8 are classified as essential amino acids. The body finds it hard to combine them with other compounds at a normal level to assist in adequate growth. The 8 are known as phenylalanine, valine, threonine, tryptophan, isoleucine, methionine, leucine, and lysine. When the isoleucine, leucine, and valine are grouped they are called BCAA or branched-chain amino acids. 1/3 of the body’s skeletal muscles are made up of BCAA. Skeletal muscles...
    289 Words | 1 Page
  • Protein and Amino Acid Supplementation in Sports
    Protein and Amino Acid Supplementation in Sports The popularity of increasing the “performance-enhancing” supplements, Protein and amino acids, has flourished among all athletes. This increase is attributed to the belief by many of the athletes that it provides endurance, strength and speed enhancement. Amino Acids (AA) enhanced physical feats, improved energy and recovery sooner from fatigue. The three vital Amino Acids which were given a high focal point among athletes are leucine,...
    1,128 Words | 3 Pages
  • Amino Acids and How They Relate to Athletics
    After a paper published by the American Dietetic Association in 1987, high protein intakes or excessive amino acids supplements have not been demonstrated to increase athletic performance. After nutritionist, the plain old answer of "eat balanced, eat normal" still remains the best known method: 0.8 grams of protein for an adult for each kilogram of body weight (recommended dietary allowance). On the other hand, more studies on athletes doing intensive training have suggested that as protein is...
    288 Words | 1 Page
  • Amino Acid Becoming A Membrane Transporter
    Biology Oxford Presentation A. Entering the epithelia cell of the small intestine, until being loaded onto the proper tRNA. Amino acid present in the lumen of the small intestine The goal is to cross through the epithelial cell membrane to enter into the epithelial cell’s cytoplasm – its charged cuz of side chains To get through the membrane the amino acid must cross the Simple columnar epithelial cells lining the apical surface of the small intestinal tract. These cells are...
    1,013 Words | 4 Pages
  • Proteins, Peptides and Amino Acids: Lab Experiments
    Test Biuret Test Reagents CuSO4 sol'n, diluted NaOH Test for Intact proteins and protein hydrlysates (at least tripeptide, 2 peptide bonds Result Pink to violet blue color Ninhyrin Test 1,2,3-indanetrione monohydrate or triketohydintene hydrate, ethanol Alpha- amino group (usually a general test for amino acids) Xanthoproteic Test Conc. HNO3, conc. NaOH For W,F,Y (aromatic except for H) Blue to blue-violet Oxidative decarboxylation color &...
    282 Words | 5 Pages
  • Titration: Identification of an Unknown Amino Acid Biochemistry
    AbstractWater is important substance for all living organisms. The physical and chemical properties of water play a central role in biological structure and function of the organism. The ionization ability of water to form H+ and OH- ions make it very unique. The hydrogen-ion concentration of biological system is usually preferred as the pH system, which determines the pH level of dilute aqueous solutions. In this laboratory, the data collected from the experiment will be used to graph the...
    771 Words | 3 Pages
  • AMINO ACID ASSAY BY NINHYDRIN COLORIMETRIC METHOD
    The reaction between alpha-amino acid and ninhydrin involved in the development of color are described by the following five mechanistic steps: alpha-amino acid + ninhydrin ---> reduced ninhydrin + alpha-amino acid + H2O alpha-amino acid + H2O ---> alpha-keto acid +NH3 alpha-keto acid + NH3 ---> aldehyde + CO2 Step (1) is an oxidative deamination reaction that removes two hydrogen from the alpha-amino acid to yield an alpha-imino acid. Simultaneously, the original ninhydrin is...
    869 Words | 4 Pages
  • Amino acids interference on the quantification of reducing sugars by the 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid assay mislead carbohydrase activity measurements”
    Carbohydrate Research 363 (2012) 33–37 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect Carbohydrate Research journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/carres Amino acids interference on the quantification of reducing sugars by the 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid assay mislead carbohydrase activity measurements Ricardo Sposina Sobral Teixeira a, , Ayla Sant’Ana da Silva a, , Viridiana Santana Ferreira-Leitão a,b, Elba Pinto da Silva Bon a,⇑ a Federal University of Rio de Janeiro,...
    3,969 Words | 19 Pages
  • Does a change within an amino acid always cause a change in the protein activity?
    Protein synthesis occurs in two steps : Transcription and Translation. Transcription is the process of creating an mRNA copy of a DNA template; the mRNA is then translated into protein. The Messenger RNA (mRNA) contains the genetic information is copied from DNA during transcription . During translation, ribosomes synthesize the proteins using the mRNA copy produced during transcription. Proteins are complex molecules that each has a very unique shape, structure and function. The shape of...
    581 Words | 2 Pages
  • Ammino Acids - 397 Words
    There are as many as 100 thousand kinds of proteins that constitute the body, and these comprise only 20 kinds of amino acids in various combinations. These 20 kinds of amino acids are essential to the body. In addition to being the materials for proteins, they are used as an energy source for the body as necessary. Further, each amino acid plays an important and unique role in the body. The list below shows the role of each amino acid. | Valine Leucine Isoleucine | All of these 3 amino...
    397 Words | 2 Pages
  • Nucleic acids - 666 Words
    Few recent advances have, for better or for worse, had such an impact on biological thinking as the discovery of base-pairing in nucleic acids. These complementariness principles do not only underlie current ideas on the structure of the nucleic acids, but they form the foundation of all speculations, more or less well- founded, on their physical properties (denaturation, hypochromic- ity, etc.), on the transfer of biological information from deoxy- ribonucleic acid to ribonucleic...
    666 Words | 3 Pages
  • proteins and nucleic acids - 1090 Words
    PROTEINS AND NUCLEIC ACIDS 28/11/13 Qn. Which two of the four macromolecules do you believe to be the most important for life? Give evidence to support your suggestion (include a full description of the macromolecules you describe both in terms of structure and function) Introduction All the four macromolecules=lipids, proteins, carbohydrates and nucleic acids= are essential for the functioning of an organism's body (Campbell, biology). They work hand in hand to help us survive. For...
    1,090 Words | 4 Pages
  • GRT TASK 2BSEDiagram Of Essential Amino
    GRT TASK 2 BSE Diagram of Essential Amino Acid Lysine ● ● Lysine is a base Physical properties: Polar, positively charged ● ● ● Highly reactive Hydrophilic Solubility: ^ soluble in cold water ● ● Reactivity: 0 Flammability: 1 (may be combustible at high temps Protein Structure Dehydration Hydrolysis Stabilizing Forces 1) Hydrophobic Interactions Non polar amino acids (leucine and phenylalanine are two examples). Weakest type of bond. 2) Hydrogen bonds: Polar or charged amino...
    477 Words | 4 Pages
  • poly gamma glutamic acid
    Bioresource Technology 79 (2001) 207±225 Review paper The production of poly-(c-glutamic acid) from microorganisms and its various applications Ing-Lung Shih *, Yi-Tsong Van Department of Environmental Engineering, Da-Yeh University, 112 Shan-Jiau Road, Da-Tsuen, Chang-Hwa 51505, Taiwan, ROC Accepted 9 April 2001 Abstract This review article deals with the chemistry and biosynthesis of poly-(c-glutamic acid) (c-PGA) produced by various strains of Bacillus. Potential applications...
    10,019 Words | 43 Pages
  • Polyaspartic Acid in Oyster Shells as Absorbent
    Abstract Our study is entitled “The Feasibility of Aspartic Acid found in Oyster Shells as an additive ingredient in improving the absorbency of commercialized sanitary napkins.” The objective of the study was to extract a protein from the oyster shells to produce aspartic acid which can replace the manufactured polymer found in commercialized sanitary napkins. The significance of our study is that the product is an alternative in producing polymers. It is also environmental friendly;...
    257 Words | 1 Page
  • Science - 737 Words
    OBJECTIVE: To detect the presence and amount of protein in a food sample. INTRODUCTION: A protein is complex, high molecular-mass, organic compound that consist of amino acids joined by peptide bonds. Proteins are essential to the structure and function of all living cells and viruses. Millon test is given by any compound containing a phenolic hydroxyl group. Consequently, any protein containing tyrosine will give a positive test of a pink to dark-red color. The millon reagent is a solution...
    737 Words | 4 Pages
  • paper chromatography - 526 Words
    PAPER and COLUMN CHROMATOGRAPHY REPORT 1. 2. The unknown code is an amino acid, Glycine. To justify the reason is because the retention factor is the same exact number as the Glycine. The data of the unknown shows everything to be exact with the data of the Glycine 3. The mobile phase is the more polar during the capillary action of the experiment. As soon as the paper touches the mobile phase, the solvent rises to the amino acids. This is where you can find polarity of the amino...
    526 Words | 2 Pages
  • Fibre Monomer & Polymer - 346 Words
    |Fibre |Basic unit(s) |Polymer | |Cotton ,Flax |The basic unit (monomer) is Glucose but the Unit that |Cellobiose | |and all cellulosics |repeats itself is Cellobiose, which consists of two |In cotton and flax there are about 5000 cellobiose units or 10000 | |including Rayons |glucose...
    346 Words | 3 Pages
  • Global Peptide Therapeutics Market 2014-2018
    Global Peptide Therapeutics Market 2014-2018 Peptides are organic compounds that are composed of amino acids linked together chemically by peptide bonds. They are among the most potent biologically active substances found in nature, and are used to control, trigger, and maintain physiological processes in living beings. However, the use of peptides as therapeutic agents has always been difficult because of their inherent instability and incapability of passing through cellular membranes....
    394 Words | 4 Pages
  • chemistry week 7 lab
    Name: Cora Wilke April 19, 2015 Laboratory 7: Building models of Biological MacromoleculesQuestions: 1. Which functional groups are involved in buiding a covalent bond between these amino acids? Amine and Carboxylic acid = Amide 2. When the covalent bond is built between alanine and glycine, which functional group will alanine use for peptide bond? Carboxylic Acid 3. When the covalent bond is built between alanine and glycine, which functional group will glycine use for peptide bond?...
    463 Words | 4 Pages
  • The Functional use of Casein in Non-Food Application
    [Type the company name] The Functional use of Casein in Non-Food Application FDST 429 Introduction Milk is one of the resources in United States that is most common. Thus, casein has been long studied because of its obtainability. Many has did research on its properties to maximize its potential usage. Casein is the main protein present in milk and cheese. It will precipitate when it reached pH 4.9 at 20C. The percentage of casein in nitrogen can be vary depend on species. For...
    1,991 Words | 6 Pages
  • Measuring Protein in Solution - 980 Words
    Laboratory Exercise #3 Measuring Protein in Solution Abstract The purpose of this lab was to learn about the Biuret assay reaction to determine if it can detect proteins and amino acids; also, to understand the process of “salting out” proteins and how to determine the amount of protein in a solution. In order to do so, egg white and ammonium sulfate were mixed on ice and then put into the centrifuge. After PBS was added, the amount of protein could then be determined. After that, 14 test...
    980 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Honors and Awards - 27742 Words
    Solomon H. Snyder BORN: Washington, D.C. December 26, 1938 EDUCATION: Georgetown College, Washington, D.C. (1955–1958) Georgetown Medical School, Washington, D.C. M.D. Cum Laude (1962) APPOINTMENTS: Research Associate, NIH, (1963–1965) Resident, Psychiatry, Johns Hopkins (1965–1968) Assistant (1966–1968), Associate (1968–1970), Full (1970– ) Professor, Johns Hopkins, Pharmacology and Psychiatry Distinguished Service Professor of Neuroscience Pharmacology and Psychiatry, Johns...
    27,742 Words | 85 Pages
  • Milk Fabric: Made of Milk Protein
    MILK FABRIC ABSTRACT: The milk fabric is new born fabric. The milk protein fabric moistens skin and it is healthy and bacteriostatic - it is the perfect material to produce underwear and socks, pants, long-sleeve T’s and jackets also. The important ingredients of milk protein fiber are milk casein proteins, which can nourish and lubricate the skin. The milk protein contains the natural humectant factor, which can capture the moisture and maintain skin’s moisture to make the skin tender and...
    1,448 Words | 5 Pages
  • Biochemical Foundations of Human Life
    Biochemistry Exam I Terminology Boiling point is the temperature at which the vapor pressure of the liquid equals the pressure surrounding the liquid. At this temperature the liquid phase changes into the gaseous phase (also a colligative property) Melting point is the temperature at which the solid and liquid phases are in equilibrium. At this temperature the solid state changes into a liquid phase (also a colligative property) Specific heat is the amount of energy (in joules or calories)...
    763 Words | 3 Pages
  • Financial Statements Report - 375 Words
    Questions | Student Response | Part IOriginal DNA Strand: 3’-TACCCTTTAGTAGCCACT-5’ | | Transcription (base sequence of RNA): 5’…AUGGGAAAUCAUCGGUGA…3’ | Translation (amino acid sequence): AUG(the start code/ methoninie), GGA (Glycine), AAU (Asparagine), CAU (Histidine), CGG (Arginine), UGA (Stop code) | | What is the significance of the first and last codons? | Explanation: The significance of the first and last codons is that theay are the start code and the stop code. | What...
    375 Words | 2 Pages
  • Past Exam - 2133 Words
    Write your name here Surname Other names Centre Number Candidate Number Edexcel GCE Biology Advanced Subsidiary Unit 1: Lifestyle, Transport, Genes and Health Thursday 8 January 2009 – Morning Time: 1 hour 15 minutes You do not need any other materials. Paper Reference 6BI01/01 Total Marks Instructions se b ink or • Uill inlack boxesball-point pen. page with your name, a the top of this • F the andt candidate number. centre number uestions. • Answer all...
    2,133 Words | 34 Pages
  • Chem 151 Tutorial notes
    LEDs… Release only ONE color of light Produce very little heat What is an LED? They are semiconductor devices that can convert electrical energy directly into light due to the nature of the bonding that occurs in the semiconductor solid. Type of bonding is directly related to conductivity of solid. Bonding in Elemental Solids Electronegativity – the ability of an atom to attract electrons to itself. Atoms with low e.n. (metals)  don’t hold valence electrons tightly ...
    1,989 Words | 12 Pages
  • 5.4.1- Synthesis of a Protein - 366 Words
    5.4.1: Synthesis of a Protein Procedure 3. Transcribe the DNA into mRNA Sequence A: AGA AGG GAG GAU UUG CAA GGU GGC CAA GAA UUA GGC GGC GGU CCC GGG GCG GGG AGU CUU CAA CCA Sequence B: AGU CUG CAA AAA CGG GGC AUU GUU GAA CAA UGU UGU ACC AGU AUU UGC AGU CUC UAC CAG UUC GAG AAU UAC UGA Sequence C: AUG UUU GUA CAU UUG UGU GGG AGU CAC CUG GUU GAG CGU UGU AUU UGG UUU GUG GCG AGC GCG GCU UUU UCU AUA 4. Beginning sequence: Sequence C since it starts with AUG (the starting codon) Middle...
    366 Words | 2 Pages
  • Protein Article Research - 484 Words
    Protein Article Research Sara Langrell December 15, 2011 Nutrition SCI/241 Dr. Venessa Lee Abstract: Athletes have been searching for years for a way to reduce the amount of recovery time between work outs. Based on this issue there has been quite a lot of research conducted to find out what can be done, if anything, to either reduce or eliminate recovery time. One of the theories is to increase protein intake above the daily recommended amount, thereby providing the body with additional...
    484 Words | 2 Pages
  • Carn of Bull Case Study
    1. The main ingredient in all of the cans is water, either carbonated or not. All of the cans have taurine, which is a non-essential amino acid, which supposedly increases reaction time. Another main ingredient in all of the drinks is caffeine, which is a Central Nervous System Stimulant, and may increase productivity. 2. The psychological role of each of these drinks is supposedly to give you energy, but I think it is all a placebo effect. 3. The ingredients that provide energy are...
    311 Words | 1 Page
  • Macromolecules Lab 2 - 506 Words
    Blake Padgett TA: Christine Hartman 9/4/2014 Fillers within Protein Supplements Local gym enthusiasts are trying to reveal if certain new dietary supplements will actually help them gain muscle mass by providing high levels of protein. Before the users consume the new supplements they want to know if they are indeed true protein supplements or if the manufacturer used fillers as a mean to make more profit. “Do the new supplements contain fillers such as sugar and starch or are...
    506 Words | 2 Pages
  • Organic Chem Chirality/R&S/Substitution/Elimination
    Name__________________________ Chemistry 190: Organic Chemistry EXAM 3 Thursday April 21, 2011 1. (12) ______ 2. (14) ______ 3. (20) ______ 4. (12) ______ 5. (54) ______ 6. (16) ______ 7. (12) ______ 8. (10) ______ Total (150) ______ The exam consists of twelve numbered pages and an unnumbered cover sheet. Make certain that you have a complete exam. You will have two hours to work on the exam. No books or notes are allowed; however, you may use a molecular model set and a...
    897 Words | 5 Pages
  • Protein Utilization Ex 5 8 5 9 Pre La
    Biology 2130 Lab Protein Utilization Pre-Lab Questions, Exercises 5-8 and 5-9 1. An amino acid consists of a carbon atom attached to a hydrogen atom, an amine group, a side group, and a _____________ group. a. glycine b. carboxyl c. nucleotide d. fatty acid 2. What product of fermentation must accumulate in the broth to cause the gene for decarboxylase to be expressed ? 3. The media used to detect the occurrence of decarboxylation turns yellow first and then purple only...
    177 Words | 2 Pages
  • Qualitative Color Reaction - 2204 Words
    Isolation, Qualitative Color Reaction and Alkaline Hydrolysis of Intact Protein Gluten Group 5, 2CMT, Faculty of Pharmacy, UST Abstract The experiment aims to isolate the intact protein which is gluten from wheat flour by difference in solubility and to analyze the chemical group responsible for color reaction and explain the principle involved in each test. Gluten is a protein composite that appears in foods processed from wheat and related species, including barley and rye. It...
    2,204 Words | 9 Pages
  • June 2013 F324 Past Paper Incomplete
    Wednesday 19 June 2013 – Morning A2 GCE CHEMISTRY A F324/01 Rings, Polymers and Analysis * F 3 1 4 7 3 0 6 1 3 * Candidates answer on the Question Paper. OCR supplied materials: • Data Sheet for Chemistry A (inserted) Duration: 1 hour 15 minutes Other materials required: • Scientific calculator * F 3 2 4 0 1 * INSTRUCTIONS TO CANDIDATES • • • • • • • The Insert will be found in the centre of this document. Write your name, centre number and candidate number in the boxes above....
    2,034 Words | 23 Pages
  • Effect of Triazophos Insecticide on Metabolites and Enzymes of Protein and Carbohydrate Metabolism
    Triazophos Insecticide Induced Biochemical Alterations in Tissues of the Fish Channa punctatus (Bloch) Naveed Abdul* and C. Janaiah Fisheries Lab, Department of Zoology, Panchsheel College of Education, Nirmal-504 106, A.P, INDIA Department of Zoology, Kakatiya University, Warangal – 506 009, A.P. India. Abstract The effect of triazophos insecticide on certain metabolites and enzymes of protein and carbohydrate metabolism was evaluated in liver and muscle tissues of the freshwater...
    2,762 Words | 9 Pages
  • Biomolecules Notes - 819 Words
    Carbohydrates, lipids and proteins 3.2.1 Distinguish between organic and inorganic compounds (2). Distinguish means to give the differences between two or more different items.  Organic compounds are based on carbon and are found in living things. There are a number of exceptions including hydrogen carbonate (HCO3- ), carbon dioxide (CO2 )and Carbon monoxide (CO).  Inorganic compounds are by default all the molecules other than those in the category above. Identify amino acids,...
    819 Words | 3 Pages
  • Insights into Protein'DNA Interactions through Structure Network Analysis
    Insights into Protein–DNA Interactions through Structure Network Analysis R. Sathyapriya.¤, M. S. Vijayabaskar., Saraswathi Vishveshwara* Molecular Biophysics Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India Abstract Protein–DNA interactions are crucial for many cellular processes. Now with the increased availability of structures of protein–DNA complexes, gaining deeper insights into the nature of protein–DNA interactions has become possible. Earlier, investigations have characterized...
    11,158 Words | 35 Pages
  • Biochemistry of Proteins. Isolation of Ovalbumin: Characterisation of Thiol Groups and Separation by Gel Filtration
    Introduction Methionine and cysteine are both sulphur containing amino acids. Most proteins will contain one, or both of them at some point in the polypeptide chain. As such, many amino acids contain sulphur in some form, which is required in small amounts in the mammalian diet. Methionine has a thioether side chain, and cysteine's contains a thiol group. These side chains exist as free thiols inside the cell, and are oxidised causing them to pair up and form disulphide bonds in an...
    1,063 Words | 4 Pages
  • Beneficial Effects of Cod Protein on Skeletal Muscle Repair
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