Abu Ghraib torture and prisoner abuse Essays & Research Papers

Best Abu Ghraib torture and prisoner abuse Essays

  • The Case of Donald Rumsfeld and Prisoner Abuse at Abu Ghraib
    Overton-Scheron475f10onlinefinal Scheron Overton December 09, 2010 Public Administration The Case of Donald Rumsfeld and Prisoner Abuse at Abu Ghraib Introduction The report on the case of Donald Rumsfeld starts off with Rumsfeld’s hearing (May 7, 2004) with the Senate Armed Services Committees. His response to the question of whether he should resign or not; is “If I felt I could not be effective, I’d resign in a minute.” The report also gives an...
    2,077 Words | 6 Pages
  • Abu Ghraib and the Normalization of Torture and Hate
    Baylee Crumpler Professor Dr. Maul Sociology 7 October 2010 Abu Ghraib Prison In the United States today, people have become less caring for others, commit tremendous amounts of crime, and show many signs of hatred. Abuses take place in peoples’ everyday lives physically, psychologically, and sexually. Crimes such as torture, rape, sodomy, and homicide became popular in Iraq, at Abu Ghraib prison. Surprisingly, these terrible acts were committed by military police personnel of the...
    542 Words | 2 Pages
  • Abu Ghraib - 718 Words
    Abu Ghraib Throughout the beginning months of 2004, one of the largest military scandals in U.S. history became the center of worldwide controversy. It has been said that the degrading acts by the U.S. military at Abu Ghraib were responsible for the suffering of innocent Iraqi civilians, the humiliation of the world's strongest defense, and for negatively affecting the United States' reputation in the world overall. Abu Ghraib, located 20 miles west of Baghdad, originally was one of the...
    718 Words | 3 Pages
  • Abu Ghraib - 1691 Words
    The prison is located in Abu Ghraib, a city 32km West of Baghdad. It has been around since the 60s, and was previously under Sadaam’s control, where it was known as a bit of a torture camp. Apparently it was known as having some of the worst cases of torture in the modern world. It sounds huge; it is estimated as being the size of a small town. (1) In 2003, the compound became responsible for foreign prisoners, long sentences, short sentences, capital crimes and "special" crimes. On the 22nd...
    1,691 Words | 5 Pages
  • All Abu Ghraib torture and prisoner abuse Essays

  • The Abu Ghraib Prison Scandal
    The Abu Ghraib prison scandal shocked the whole nation into disbelief that our United State's army can do such a thing. In Marianne Szegedy-Maszak's, The Abu Ghraib Prison Scandal: Sources of Sadism, explains the rough conditions and new situations these young soldiers were faced. The Abu Graib prison shared many traits needed to make our everyday human beings in to a torturer. But, what would it take for me and you to act out such a horrific ordeal? Yale psychologist Stanley Milgram created...
    503 Words | 2 Pages
  • Abu Ghraib Case Study
    El e c t r on i c Ha llw a y ® Case Teaching Resources FROM THE EVANS SCHOOL OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS T he Box 353060 · University of Washington · Seattle WA 98195 -3060 www.hallway.org DONALD RUMSFELD AND PRISONER ABUSE AT ABU GHRAIB Facing the Senate Armed Services Committees on May 7, 2004, Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld responded to the question of whether he would resign over the recently exposed prisoner abuse allegations in Iraq: “Needless to say, if I felt I could not be...
    9,852 Words | 28 Pages
  • Abu Ghraib - Essay - 1029 Words
    Over-obedience to military authority has been a controversial topic for many years. The most recent case was during the era of Saddam Hussein at Abu Ghraib, a U.S. military prison located right outside of Baghdad. There have been studies conducted and experiments performed in the attempt of a better understanding of the despicable actions of our fellow citizens. The Stanford Prison Experiment, conducted by Phillip G. Zimbardo, is one similar to the Abu Ghraib case. While it was merely a mock...
    1,029 Words | 3 Pages
  • Abu Ghraib Essay - 1018 Words
    Starting in 2004, reports of physical, psychological and sexual abuse including torture, rape, sodomy, waterboarding (“a prisoner is strapped to a board, or submerged, or held down and forced to breathe through a water-soaked cloth held over his mouth. All waterboarding produces the physical sensation of drowning and a psychological sensation of panic, fear and loss of control[1]”) and homicide of the prisoners at Abu Ghraib become known to the public eye. The acts were committed by members of...
    1,018 Words | 3 Pages
  • Abu Ghraib - The Inside Story
    How does ‘Lyndiee England at Abu Ghraib’ help us to understand why good people to bad things? Lyndiee, before being posted in Iraq, was an innocent soldier or a ‘good person’. However, when she tortured the prisoners in Abu Ghraib to the extent the actions were deemed to be an example of dehumanisation, she was labelled a bad person by society. When I watched the video I became aware that she was still a good person but she had just done bad things because of the situation she was in...
    504 Words | 2 Pages
  • Decribe the key issue Abu Ghraib
    Outline a key issue for obedience, discuss by using theories/studies from obedience for what happened in Abu Ghraib The Abu Ghraib prison is a notorious prison in Iraq, located in Abu Ghraib, near Baghdad. US soldiers were told to abuse and humiliate the prisoners by their leaders; this included chaining them up, treating them like dogs, and sometimes sexually harassing them. In April 2004 the abuses at Abu Ghraib were exposed with photos and videos showing US soldiers abusing naked Iraqis. On...
    1,131 Words | 3 Pages
  • The Critique of "The Abu Ghraib Prison Scandal: Sources of Sadism"
    The Critique of "The Abu Ghraib Prison Scandal: Sources of Sadism" In the article "The Abu Ghraib Prison Scandal: Sources of Sadism," Marianne Szegedy- Maszak discusses the horrifying acts of our American soldiers against the Iraqi detainees in the Abu Ghraib prison. The American guards photographed themselves torturing and humiliating the prisoners. Marianna presents the idea that maybe these few guards aren't just ‘a few bad seeds' but in fact any average person would commit similar acts...
    319 Words | 1 Page
  • Real Life vs. vs. Abu Ghraib
    Real-life similarities and differences between The Stanford Prison Experiment and Abu Ghraib. Dawud R. Gilmore Worcester State University Psychology 101 Dr. Soysa June 28, 2012 Abstract American soldiers brutalized Iraqis. How far does the responsibility go? During the era of Saddam Hussein, Abu Ghraib was one of the worlds worst and most notorious prisons. From torture, to executions, to terrible living conditions. This was the honest view of the horrors of war. The mistreatment at...
    705 Words | 3 Pages
  • Stanford Prison Experiment to the Atrocities at Abu Ghraib Prison - Short Essay
    Will Kingrey Psychology 2301 / Section 304 Ms. Cohn 11/27/2012 Stanford Prison Experiment to the Atrocities at Abu Ghraib Prison From August 14 to August 20 of 1971 researchers at Stanford University in California funded an experiment that took regular untrained students and placed them in a prison type setting. Twenty four were chosen, some were designated as prisoners and others as guards. The experiment lasted only six of the planned fourteen day because a researcher who came to...
    695 Words | 2 Pages
  • Comparitive Critique of Stanley Milgram's Prison Experiment and "The Abu Ghraib Prison Scandal: Sources of Sadism" by Marianne Szegedy-Maszak.
    Put in the right circumstances, every human being has the potential to be a sadist. In "The Stanford Prison Experiment", Phillip G. Zimbardo examines how easily people can slip into roles and become sadistic to the people around them, even going so far as to develop a sense of supremacy. He does this by explaining the results of his experiment that he created to understand more about the effects that imprisonment has on prisoners, and how a prison environment affects the guards who work there....
    1,518 Words | 5 Pages
  • Summary of Stanley Milgram's Prison Experiment and "The Abu Ghraib Prison Scandal: Sources of Sadism" by Marianne Szegedy-Maszak.
    In The Abu Ghraib Prison Scandal: Sources of Sadism by Marianne Szegedy-Maszak, Szegedy-Maszak says that rationalizing the stark change in mentality of the young American soldiers who kept watch over the Iraqi prisoners in the Abu Ghraib prison would be a very challenging task. Some may blame inexperience or dereliction of duty by commanding officers. Others may say that stress caused by living in a war zone was responsible. However, it has become clear that no single reason would be sufficient...
    779 Words | 3 Pages
  • Torture and Public Policy - 1576 Words
    Torture and Public Policy Kevin Huckabee Stephen F. Austin State University Prepared for: PBA-500 Survey of Public Administration Abstract The subsequent case study, prepared by James P. Pfiffner, Torture and Public Policy, (2010) analyzes the torture and abuse of war prisoners by United States military personnel in Abu Ghraib, Iraq, and Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, following photographs of the abuse spread around the world in the fall of 2003. Pfiffner points out that the United States...
    1,576 Words | 5 Pages
  • Does the Ends Justify the Means: Justifying the Use of Torture in the Name of Public Interest
    Does The Ends Justify the Means: Justifying the use of torture in the name of Public Interest Kenneth Rudominer Florida Gulf Coast University Introduction to Public Administration PAD 6060 Margaret E. Banyan, PhD January 20, 2013 Does The Ends Justify the Means: Justifying the use of torture in the name of Public Interest Public Administration can be thought of as where the rubber meets the road in the act of governing via the Constitution. Under normal conditions the framework of the...
    1,292 Words | 4 Pages
  • Stanford Prison Experiment - 361 Words
    Stanford Prison Study (SPE), Zimbardo carried out, an experiment. This experiment had 24 final participants. The guards’ task was to humiliate the prisoners and make the prisoners feel powerless. The result of this experiment was that the guards identified themselves as the in-group and the prisoners as the out-group. In SPE, the participants signed consent to be part of the study. The participants were debriefed and offered money at the end of the experiment. The researches were carrying...
    361 Words | 1 Page
  • Botero Essay - 987 Words
    Often times, art lends itself as a vehicle for political agenda. A recent example would be Fernando Botero’s series, Abu Ghraib, which is based on the torturous events that took place by US soldiers at Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq. The series is a sharp contrast from the whimsical and oversized imagery Botero is best known for, and depicts the truculent abuse inmates were subjected to while in Abu Ghraib. Abu Ghraib 44 (2005); Oil on Canvas, shows a prisoner stripped of his undergarments and...
    987 Words | 3 Pages
  • Humans Have a Tremendous Capacity for Compassion and Hatred, Peace and War, Harmony and Conflict
    Introduction: The plasticity of human is endlessly tremendous as a mystery. General speaking that human beings are filled with compassion but sometimes regard things with hatred; some people fire to each other whereas they declare that they are loyal believers for peace; and possibly humans are more capable for conflict than harmony. This essay is going to interpret that the human conflict, intervention and the issue about identifying good and evil, in order to unfold the statement that...
    1,975 Words | 6 Pages
  • sdvcsd - 370 Words
    From late 2003 to early 2004, during the Iraq War, military police personnel of the United States Army and the Central Intelligence Agency[1] committed human rights violations against prisoners held in the Abu Ghraib prison. They physically and sexually abused, tortured,[2][3][4] raped,[2][3] sodomized,[4] and killed[5] prisoners. It came to public attention in early 2004, beginning with United States Department of Defense announcements. As revealed in the Taguba Report (2004), an initial...
    370 Words | 2 Pages
  • Critical and Creative Thinking II
     Critical and Creative Thinking II Tamera Whalen-Blount PSY 103/ Introduction to Psychology December 10, 2014 Gloria Ringsby 1. Have you ever changed a strongly held attitude? What caused the change for you? I am fiercely afraid of large animals by nature, but “aggressive” dogs in particular, especially dogs associated with negative behaviors such as Rottweiler’s and Pit Bulls. I had this attitude for as long as I can remember growing up, until my father bought my brother and I a...
    810 Words | 3 Pages
  • What Makes Good People Do Bad Things
    What makes good people do bad things? Zimbardo’s Stanford Prison experiment was to study the behavior of normal people under a particular situation. The students who took part in the experiment would play the role of either guard or a prisoner in a mock prison. Most of the students that played as the guards of the mock prison became very cruel as they abused their power and authority over the prisoners. The students that played as the prisoners were frightened and became submissive to the...
    522 Words | 2 Pages
  • Reflection Paper - 597 Words
    Reflection #7 Ghost of Abu Ghraib ​Filmmaker Rory Kennedy takes us thru a firsthand accord of Abu-Ghraib, a prison where Saddam Hussein housed his prisoners but during the Iraqi war U.S soldiers took hold of this prison using it as their own prison for suspected terrorist and people they believed to be aiding terrorist. However what went on behind the walls of this prison was nothing less than admiral behavior, on the part of the soldiers. Prisoners were abused, humiliated and treated as...
    597 Words | 2 Pages
  • Why Do Good People Do Bad Things
    Why do good people do bad things? (750 words) In this essay I will talk about the torturing of prisoners in Abu Ghraib. I will also write about the Stanley Milgrim Experiment and the Stanford Prison Experiment. All of these relate to one of the topics we have covered this term. There is an excellent example of uniforms influencing power in the Stanford Prison experiment which took place in1971, it was lead by Prof Zimbardo1 (see footnote) in which a group of students were selected to act as...
    779 Words | 2 Pages
  • Creative and Critical Thinking 2
    Creative and Critical Thinking II 1. Have you ever changed a strongly held attitude? What caused the change for you? I have only experienced a shift in my personal beliefs once: at one point in time I believed I was relegated to working in a factory, now I do not have the same belief. I believe that the shift in my attitude was due to an internal growth; I became more self-aware after my father passed away. I looked at my father, and all he had done, and began to believe that I was capable of...
    707 Words | 2 Pages
  • Power Corrupts and Absolute Power Corrupts Absolutely
    Power Corrupts and Absolute Power Corrupts Absolutely Throughout history the argument of power falling hand in hand with corruption has been brought to our attention in devastating scenes of destruction, turmoil and moments which will never be forgotten. But do these moments conclude that power eventually leads to corruption? Are there events over the past 100 years or more which argue this fact? In this essay I will discuss my own opinion on this topic looking at crucial figure heads in...
    2,396 Words | 6 Pages
  • Police Brutality and Noble Cause
     1. List three examples of “subcultural traits”. a. Passion b. Perspective c. professionals 2. What does it mean when we say “smell of the victim’s blood”? Please explain. Police are resolutely focused on the consequences of crimes for victims also motivate cops in a way no other cause does. Protecting the public doing something meaningful for other people. 3. What are the three ways that Police Officers have to get people to do what they want them to do? a. Noble...
    489 Words | 3 Pages
  • "Why Not Everyone Is A Torturer" By Oliver Behrensdorff
    Why Not Everyone Is A Torturer - Oliver Behrensdorff What are the causes of atrocity events such as the massacre at My Lai, the abuse and torture of Iraqi prisoners in Abu Ghraib or the extermination of Jews during World War II? Whether groups of people bestowed with unaccountable power naturally resort to violence or not, the subject is indeed controversial. Arguably, the less restrictions that one must follow, the higher the risk becomes of one to condone violence. However, how can we...
    1,205 Words | 4 Pages
  • Human Rights Mechanisms - 572 Words
    Article 5 of the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights states that “No one shall be subjected to torture or to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.” Torture is a serious issue and often goes unreported. An example of an incident is the Abu Ghraib Prison incident in Iraq. Beginning in 2003 numerous accounts of abuse and torture of prisoners held in the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq occurred. These acts were committed by personnel of the 372nd military police company, CIA...
    572 Words | 2 Pages
  • Critical and Creative Thinking in Society Essay
    Critical and Creative Thinking in Society Essay PHL/458 January 5, 2015 Zoanne Brace Critical and Creative Thinking in Society Essay Describe a situation of public interest in which critical and /or creative thought not used for a better outcome. Describe why it is important to think critically and creatively is similar situations. In the United States, sadly, situations of public interest occur almost on a daily basis. These conditions can happen on any level, anywhere at the work...
    1,646 Words | 5 Pages
  • Who Is To Blame Essay
    Who Is To Blame? As humans in search of friendship, love, and care we sometimes change ourselves in order to fit in with the people around us. Have you ever caught yourself copying your friends just because you did not want to be made fun of? Humans do not want to feel alone so we follow others even if their actions are wrong. If a person is born and raised in a neighborhood full of criminals that are stealing and killing every day, that person will eventually accept these actions as a way of...
    906 Words | 3 Pages
  • Response to Lucifer Effect - 764 Words
    Ashley Barney Critical Response #1 BHS-1382 Robert J, Wafula January 26, 2012 A Critical Response to the Lucifer Effect Philip Zambardo tries to establish in his writing how someone of good morals can exhibit harsh actions, what it takes for them to do such an unspeakable act, and the evidence of ungodly actions in recent history. The Lucifer Effect is organized in Mini Chapters to structure Zambardo’s writing. In the beginning of the essay, Zambardo states the Lucifer Effect is his...
    764 Words | 2 Pages
  • Hidden side to mankind - 3014 Words
    Jesus Guadarrama Ms. LaPorta English 100 15 December 2011 Hidden side of mankind Throughout history, execrable acts of corrupt human behavior have stunned mankind. While one might not see themselves capable of committing acts of torture towards others, and possibly killing another human being, experiments and real historical events have proven that there is a gruesome side within human beings expressed when placed in a position of power or control. Those who are not in that position...
    3,014 Words | 8 Pages
  • Zimbardo Paper - 1131 Words
     Zimbardo’s Prison Experiment Marie Wesley PSYCH/620 Dr. Gardner 27 October, 2014 The Zimbardo Stanford Prison experiment is said to be the best known psychological study of all time. This study included the voluntary participation of twenty-four anti-authority college students who were randomly assigned to the role of “guard” or “prisoner” and then placed in a simulated prison environment. The goal of the experiment was to see what would happen when you put good people into...
    1,131 Words | 4 Pages
  • Time-distorting Experiences - 544 Words
    a. In the experiment, what police procedures were used during arrests, and how did these procedures lead people to feel confused, fearful, and dehumanized? The procedures used during arrest were the same as a regular arrest but the person being arrested was left confused, fearful, and dehumanized because they had no clue what was going on and what was going to happen to them. b. What are the effects of living in an environment with no clocks, no view of the outside world, and minimal...
    544 Words | 2 Pages
  • Why not everyone is a torturer
    Why not everyone is a torturer Write an essay (900-1200 words) in which you analyse and comment on the article "Why not everyone is a torturer" by Stephen Reicher and Alex Haslam. “Why not everyone becomes a torturer” is an article written by Stephen Reicher and Alex Haslam, 2004. The article tries to explain why people become torturers, that evil is inside of humanity. This paper exposes that evil is inside all of us. The article refers to the Abu Ghraib prison, the...
    874 Words | 3 Pages
  • News Stories That Changed the World
    Introduction Rendell, Hart and Hollar have said broadcasting the truth can improve the world, while news that twists or denies realities of our existence can have momentous consequences. We believe this concept and to demonstrate it we have complied 3 major news stories since the year 2000 that have had a major impact on our society both nationally and internationally – and both for better or for worse. These three examples are not meant to be a collection of the most historic stories of the...
    2,522 Words | 7 Pages
  • The Lucifer Effect: Understanding How Good People Turn Evil
    he Lucifer Effect raises a fundamental question about the nature of human nature: How is it possible for ordinary, average, even good people to become perpetrators of evil? In trying to understand unusual, or aberrant behavior, we often err in focusing exclusively on the inner determinants of genes, personality, and character, as we also tend to ignore what may be the critical catalyst for behavior change in the external Situation or in the System that creates and maintains such situations. I...
    1,797 Words | 5 Pages
  • The Lucifer Effect - 699 Words
    The Lucifer Effect: Understanding How Good People Turn Bad Report What makes good people do atrocious crimes? When you put on a uniform you are thirteen times more likely to commit heinous acts and the soldiers of the Abu Ghraib prison are only one of the many examples. The prisoners at the Abu Ghraib prison were forced to partake in homosexual acts, suffered malnutrition, and had their sense of humanity taken away. These soldiers were taught to stick together and follow orders without...
    699 Words | 2 Pages
  • Stanford Prison Experiment - 608 Words
    The Stanford Prison Experiment was a psychology experiment based on the abuse of prisoners. There was a psychological study that was done on 24 college students who were paid 15.00 a day to participate. The experiment was a study of the human response to captivity, in particular, to the real world circumstances of prison life, not for punishment purposes. They wanted to closely simulate a prison environment, so that the volunteers can really get the feel of what being in prison is like without...
    608 Words | 2 Pages
  • Media Blackouts - 556 Words
    Winston Churchill once said that a lie gets halfway around the world before the truth has a chance to get its pants on. In today’s world it’s always the same story where media is often controlled to be used as a tool of manipulation that is used to change people’s thinking. Media often falsifies information, creates lies, ignores truths and hides realities and facts to give way for more important and secret plans. I believe news media often misrepresent global events by creating media blackouts....
    556 Words | 2 Pages
  • Us - Iraq War - 1384 Words
    The US-Iraq War, a military action led by the United States against the regime of Saddam Hussein, the authoritarian leader of Iraq. US president George W. Bush, who announced the beginning of the war in March 2003, explained that the goals were to disarm Iraq and to free its people. For months, President Bush had threatened war, arguing that Saddam Hussein's regime posed a grave threat to US security and peace in the region because of its alleged pursuit of weapons of mass destruction. The...
    1,384 Words | 4 Pages
  • Deindividuation and Its Role in Modern Society
    Conner Wilson 10-23-2012 Composition I The Deindividuation of Society Since the beginning of time, mankind has advanced as a society of many; each person and individual a piece in the great machine that is time. This unity, this joining of forces, has driven mankind forward throughout the dark ages of humanity’s past and into the modern world people live in today. Much has changed with the passing of time, but what has not changed is humanity’s primal instinct to create allies and forge...
    1,178 Words | 3 Pages
  • Psychology - 295 Words
    Chapter 13 * Examples such as UFO sightings, cow mutilations by aliens, and crop circles demonstrate how ____social comparison_____________ can lead to mass hysteria and collective delusions. * The main task of the Solomon Asch studies was judging line lengths>>> conformity * one third * How many confederates did Asch find maximized the likelihood of conformity occurring? B) 4 * parametric studies * Masami, a Japanese female * Autokinetic effect *...
    295 Words | 2 Pages
  • Zimbardo Research Paper - 785 Words
     Zimbardo Research Paper Christina Parker PSYCH 620 October 21, 2013 Stacy Hernandez Zimbardo Research Paper Dr. Zimbardo conducted the Stanford Prison Experiment (SPE) in 1971, but the data from that project is as useful in today’s society as it was then. The question now is what impact the study had on social psychology, the value of the study, the study’s relevance to contemporary world issues, the value of the study to humanity as a whole, problems and ethical concerns...
    785 Words | 3 Pages