A Clockwork Orange Essays & Research Papers

Best A Clockwork Orange Essays

  • A Clockwork Orange - 1747 Words
    A Clockwork Orange The freedom of choice and the rehabilitating form of corrections encase the realm of A Clockwork Orange, by Anthony Burgess. It produces the question about man's free will and the ability to choose one's destiny, good or evil. "If he can only perform good or only perform evil, then he is a clockwork orange-meaning that he has the appearance of an organism lovely with colour and juice but is in fact only a clockwork toy to be wound up by God or the Devil or State"(Burgess...
    1,747 Words | 5 Pages
  • A Clockwork Orange - 1440 Words
    Anthony Burgess' A Clockwork Orange is a dystopian novel set in an oppressive, futuristic state. Published in 1962, A Clockwork Orange is an extremely intense, graphic, and, at times, horrifying novel. A reader begins to question their own values as they become numb and desensitized to the violence at hand. Both behaviorism and free will is occurring throughout A Clockwork Orange. A Clockwork Orange brings up a question, how much control of our own free will do we actually have? Do we...
    1,440 Words | 4 Pages
  • Clockwork Orange - 309 Words
    The choice between good and evil is a decision every man must make throughout his life in order to guide his actions and control his future. This element of choice, no matter what the outcome, displays man's power as an individual. Any efforts to control or influence this choice between good and evil will in turn govern man's free will and enslave him. In the novel A Clockwork Orange, the author, Anthony Burgess, uses symbolism through imagery, the characterization of Alex, and the...
    309 Words | 1 Page
  • Clockwork Orange - 1516 Words
    "A man who cannot choose ceases to be a man."—Anthony Burgess A Clockwork Orange is a novel about moral choice and free will. Alex's story shows what happens when an individual's right to choose is robbed for the good of society. The first and last chapters place Alex in more or less the same physical situation but his ability to exercise free will leads him to diametrically opposite choices—good versus evil. The phrase, "what's it going to be then, eh?," echoes throughout the book; only...
    1,516 Words | 4 Pages
  • All A Clockwork Orange Essays

  • A Clockwork Orange - 1088 Words
    A Clockwork Orange A Clockwork Orange, by Anthony Burgess occurs in a dystopian futuristic Britain and explores the idea of using psychological conditioning to eliminate crime. The protagonist, Alex, a 15-year old in England suffering from Antisocial Personality disorder; a leader of a gang involved in violence, robbery, and rape. The book has two main themes and divided into three parts; the first part of the book focuses on Alex’s criminal lifestyle, the second focuses on Alex’s...
    1,088 Words | 3 Pages
  • A Clockwork Orange - 1399 Words
    “There is a little Alex in all of us” In Anthony Burgess’s Clockwork Orange one important question keeps popping up throughout the whole book. The question is does goodness exist in this novel? “Burgess novel is troubling and frustrating on a number of levels. He has presented us with a stark image of evil, and perhaps of a greater evil in attempting to counteract it” (Newman 68). I would have to say that no one in the novel is good. From beginning to end; page after page in one way or...
    1,399 Words | 4 Pages
  • A Clockwork Orange - 909 Words
    The novel A Clockwork Orange written by Anthony Burgess and published in 1962 is a brilliant commentary on humanity and morality in our evermore controlling world. Burgess believes that the freedom to make moral choices is what seperates human beings from plant life and lower animals. He illustrates his beliefs on morality with his main character Alex. Alex is given freedom to make his own choices, and is able to see good and bad as both equally valid decisions. Once the state removes Alex’s...
    909 Words | 3 Pages
  • A Clockwork Orange - 847 Words
     This Must be a Real Horrorshow Novella if you're so keen on my Viddying it. Anthony Burgess’ 1962 dystopic satire, A Clockwork Orange takes place in a future Londonesque city governed by a repressive, totalitarian super-state. In this society, ordinary citizens have fallen into a passive lethargy of complacency, blind to the illusive growth of a rampant, violent youth culture. Our Humble Narrator and anti-hero is Alex, a sly, witty, charming, Beethoven loving 15 year old nadsat who heads a...
    847 Words | 3 Pages
  • A Clockwork Orange - 797 Words
    A Clockwork Orange 2 A Clockwork Orange: Movie Critique One of the most controversial films of the early 1970’s, or even of all time, was a film that took the aspects of Aversion Therapy and Classical Conditioning to an all new level. A Clockwork Orange by Stanley Kubrick (1971), based on the novel by Anthony Burgess, illustrates what happens when different types of psychological therapy are used to treat violent behavior. The main character in this movie, Alex, along with his...
    797 Words | 3 Pages
  • A Clockwork Orange - 1904 Words
     English Composition 102 April 27, 2012 Morality: Manner, Character and Proper Behavior INTRODUCTION In his film A Clockwork Orange, Stanley Kubrick, an American film director and producer, creates a futuristic London where youth gang violence and other social subjects are portrayed. The main character, Alex DeLarge, is a sociopath who likes listening to Beethoven and is fascinated with raping women, amongst other things he is also the leader of the gang, which...
    1,904 Words | 6 Pages
  • Clockwork Orange - 2101 Words
    Mitchell Ronayne English 200:15 A Clockwork Orange Essay 5 Dec 2013 Malenky Machines: Off It Itties The decision to choose between good and evil is one simple choice that separates a human from being a machine. Being unable to choose from the two is “…like little chellovecks made out of tin and with a spring inside and then a winding handle on the outside” (Burgess, 203). There comes a point in a man’s life where he stops being a machine and becomes something else entirely. In the book A...
    2,101 Words | 6 Pages
  • A Clockwork Orange - 1124 Words
    The first time I saw the book name “A Clockwork Orange”, I think it is weird. What is “clockwork orange”? Clockwork is a structure of a machine while orange is a fruit. This awkward combination makes no sense to me. And that’s just what the author was trying to express, the feeling of awkward, queer and bizarre. By reading the introduction in the beginning part of the book, I came to know that Clockwork oranges exist only in the speech of old Londoners. The image was a bizarre one, always used...
    1,124 Words | 3 Pages
  • Occupy a Clockwork Orange: Meaningful Violence in a Clockwork Orange
    Occupy A Clockwork Orange: Meaningful Violence in A Clockwork Orange Violence is unavoidable in our society. It hits us from every direction, you can’t watch TV for more than an hour without seeing some sort of violence nor can you listen to the radio without hearing of violent acts. However, George Gerbner asserts that seeing all of the violence is not necessarily detrimental to our minds. To Gerbner violence that, “Individually crafted, historically inspired, sparingly and selectively...
    1,165 Words | 3 Pages
  • A Clockwork Orange Narrative Devices
    "A Clockworck Orange" by Anthony Burges, is a novel that relates a terrible daydream of England in a future time where bands of adolescent hooligans ignore the main rules of living together in society, and every night take control of the town. The novel describes the different violent acts that Alex, a fifteen year old boy and the protagonist of the novel, carries out with his three "droogs" (friend-servants) against several random victims. Alex is betrayed by his friends and is caught in one of...
    1,001 Words | 3 Pages
  • A Clockwork Orange Notes. - 1616 Words
    A Clockwork Orange Notes Novels are equipped to depict human psychology but are not equip to portray abstract concepts of institutional authority and agency. Alex’s fare in AClockwork Orange is tied to the fate of the novel. It is a drama about the fate of the novel. Burgess failed to consider that institutions neutralise threats to them by deferring threats. Alex believes he is a freedom fighter but the government sees him as a juvenile delinquent. They use this definition to introduce...
    1,616 Words | 5 Pages
  • Use of Language in a Clockwork Orange
    Examination of the Use of Language in "A Clockwork Orange" The created patch-work language of Nadsat in the novel, A Clockwork Orange, satirizes the social classes and gang life of Anthony Burgess's futuristic society. The most prominent of these tools being his use of a completely new language and the depiction of family life from the eyes of a fifteen year old English hoodlum. Burgess effectively broke arcane traditions when he wrote A Clockwork Orange by blending two forms of effective...
    2,100 Words | 6 Pages
  • Journal Entry - A Clockwork Orange
    Journal Entry #3 – A Clockwork Orange Burgess’ novel, A Clockwork Orange, carries many themes prevalent to the time-period of the novel’s release. In a futuristic city governed by a repressive totalitarian super-state, humans have become machines or lower animals. The main protagonist of the story, Alex, asserts his free will by deciding to live a life of debauchery and violence before being robbed of his free-will by the government. When A Clockwork Orange was written the war against...
    502 Words | 2 Pages
  • Ludovico Technique - a Clockwork Orange
    A Clockwork Orange – Ludovico technique 1. What is the Ludovico Technique? How is it meant to work? Pay close attention to the text in your response. The prison Chaplain confirmed Alex’s idea of the Ludovico technique as a technique that is meant to be a sort of treatment that “gets you out (of prison) quickly and makes sure you that you don’t get (back) in again.” It is said to work by showing a series of a special type of film to the ‘patient’ and injecting something that is...
    1,077 Words | 3 Pages
  • Book Analysis: A Clockwork Orange
    In Burgess's novel A Clockwork Orange, we see the dilemma of a young man named Alex. Alex and his droogs live a violent life of stealing, raping, and ultra-violence. In the book, Alex is only fifteen but in Kubrick's film Alex is a shade older. The book is about the effects of a controlling society on its citizens and the ramifications of cynical authorities. Most would agree that Alex and his droogs are committing wrong and senseless acts; but what makes the novel so interesting is how the...
    546 Words | 2 Pages
  • A clockwork orange essay - 1688 Words
    There have been many books published solely on philosophy, and many more than that solely written about human nature, but very infrequently will a book be published that weaves these fields together as well as A Clockwork Orange, by Anthony Burgess. In this Book Burgess speculated on the fact “the significance of maturing by choice is to gain moral values and freedoms.” He achieved this task by pushing his angsty teenaged character, Alex, through situations that challenge the moral values of...
    1,688 Words | 4 Pages
  • A Clockwork Orange Short Task
     ‘A Clockwork Orange’ is a bildungsroman and dystopian novel about a teenager named Alex, a Beethoven-loving, head-bashing punk who leads his gang of “droogs” on “ultra-violent” assaults. In ‘A Clockwork Orange’ Burgess often uses language, form and structure to help the reader understand the bizarre, dystopian society in which it is set and the unique personality of Alex. Nadsat language often appears throughout the extract; we usually experience it through Alex or his droogs. We see the use...
    1,258 Words | 3 Pages
  • A Clockwork Orange - 5 - 859 Words
    Maeve Doolan September 13, 2012 Honors English A Clockwork Orange Good vs. Evil In the novel A Clockwork Orange the reader almost automatically differentiates the good characters vs. the bad characters without any hesitation. The author does a great job of categorizing the good and bad in the novel; the bad being almost all youth and the good being the obedient parents who follow through the motions of living. However the obvious good and bad...
    859 Words | 3 Pages
  • A Clockwork Orange: a critical view
    By psychological definition, people affected with antisocial personality disorder (also known as "sociopaths" or "psychopaths") have incredible manipulation skills. They fail to conform to social norms, are deceitful and aggressive, and seek to destroy with little remorse. Sex, cruelty, and dominance define parts of antisocial personality behavior, and also perfectly define the odd, near-antithesis of a hero, Alex, in A Clockwork Orange who exists as the "beloved" psychopath in this story. He...
    1,523 Words | 5 Pages
  • A Clockwork Orange: Political Impacts
    A Clockwork Orange: Political Impacts When A Clockwork Orange was released in the early 70's it was instantly seen as controversial sparking huge amounts of criticism in America and Britain from renowned film critics, government officials and members of conservative groups. In the late 60's Western society and culture was changing along with Western Cinema as a result of the old studio system collapsing, signalling the end of Classical Hollywood films. With the rise of television into popular...
    480 Words | 2 Pages
  • A Clockwork Orange: Free Will
    A Clockwork Orange: Free Will December 16, 2010 A Clockwork Orange: Free Will “I don’t care about the dangers father, I just want to be good; I want the rest of my life to be one act of goodness” (Kubrick, 1971). The father responds, “The question is whether or not his technique really makes a man good, goodness comes from within, goodness is chosen, when a man can not choose, he seizes to be a man” (Kubrick, 1971). This is a conversation between the delinquent Alex and the prison...
    1,589 Words | 5 Pages
  • ANNOTATION TO THE BOOK “A CLOCKWORK ORANGE”
    ANNOTATION TO THE BOOK “A CLOCKWORK ORANGE” Title: “A Clockwork Orange” Author: Anthony Burgess Genre: Science Fiction Setting (place): London, England Setting (time): the Future The book «A Clockwork Orange» written by Anthony Burgess was published in 1962 and the late 1950's and early 1960's were a crazy time for the United States, Britain, and everyone else worldwide. A terrifying tale about good and evil and the meaning of human freedom, A Clockwork Orange became an instant classic...
    420 Words | 2 Pages
  • A Clockwork Orange Summary and Analysis
    Zach Ward English Period 1 Final Exam: A Clockwork Orange A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess, W.W. Norton and Company, New York, 1986. A Clockwork Orange is a book set in a nightmarish future society, where criminals take over after dark. The book is centralized around a teenager, Alex, who is the leader of a gang consisting of Alex and his three “droogs” (friends) Georgie, Pete, and Dim. They steal from, beat up, torture, and sometimes rape their victims. The most inventive...
    368 Words | 2 Pages
  • Morality in a Clockwork Orange - 765 Words
    In the novel A Clockwork Orange, the main character, Alex, is introduced as a fifteen year old with an uncanny vision for the life he so desires. As most teenagers do, Alex firmly believes that he knows all there is to know about the world, and believes that he and his "droogs" (Burgess, 5) have what it takes to wreak havoc on society. However for Alex, it is his actions that speak louder than his words, and it is his horrifying yet vivid criminal acts, that show that he is a soul without...
    765 Words | 2 Pages
  • Analysis a Clockwork Orange - 915 Words
    Many of us like to think that humanity as a whole is progressing to a better future where we will live united and in peace with one another. Nevertheless, there are those among us that do not share these beliefs. In A Clockwork Orange, by Anthony Burgess, a futuristic world is turned upside down and in shambles. This 1962 classic is a frightful depiction of what our society could become and possibly, what it already is. Drugs almost seem to be legal and unregulated and subsequently are widely...
    915 Words | 3 Pages
  • A Clockwork Orange: Violence and Corruption
    A Clockwork Orange: Violence and Corruption Alex, the fifteen year old narrator of Anthony Burgess's novel, A Clockwork Orange, lives in a society where violence reigns. This novel has a very direct nature, and is often blunt to the point of offense, but this makes it more powerful and helps to further its point. This point is that everyone is out for themselves, whether they be the police, government or citizens of this society. In this book, the police can be just as violent as Alex...
    972 Words | 3 Pages
  • A Clockwork Orange - Essay - 543 Words
    A Clockwork Orange Authors who write of other times and places help us to better understand our own lives. Discuss A Clockwork Orange in terms of that statement. A "clockwork orange" can be described as something that has a convincing outer appearance yet in the inside is merely controlled by outer influences, such as a clock set in motion by its owner. In A Clockwork Orange, Anthony Burgess takes us into the future where violent criminals are forced to be "good," and introduces us...
    543 Words | 2 Pages
  • A Clockwork Orange novel - 890 Words
    A Clockwork Orange is a 1971 British film adapted from Anthony Burgess’ A Clockwork Orange novel written in 1962. The film is about a mischievous and troubled young man named Alex de Large. Alex and his gang of friends enjoy causing harm and watching others suffer. They run around London at night and commit random acts of robbery and rape. Alex, as the ringleader of all the madness, gets caught by the police and is sent to prison. While Alex is in prison, scientists study his violent behavior....
    890 Words | 3 Pages
  • Anthony Burgess: Clockwork Orange
    Anthony Burgess' novel, A Clockwork Orange has been called shocking, controversial, and horrifying. A Clockwork Orange is controversial, but to focus merely on the physical aspects of the work is time wasted. Burgess is concerned with the issue of ethics. He believes that goodness comes directly from choice; it is better to choose the bad than to be forced into doing the good. For taking away a person's free will is simply turning them into a piece of "clockwork"; a piece of machine containing...
    493 Words | 2 Pages
  • Free Will in a Clockwork Orange
    "The Importance of Moral Choice" Choice and free will are necessary to maintain humanity, both individually and communally; without them, man is no longer human but a "clockwork orange", a mechanical toy, as demonstrated in Anthony Burgess' novel, "A Clockwork Orange". The choice between good and evil is a decision every man must make throughout his life in order to guide his actions and control his future. Forcing someone to be good is not as important as the act of someone choosing to be...
    1,534 Words | 4 Pages
  • A Clockwork Orange: the Novel
    A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess portrays the problem between order in society and the freedom of individuals. The novel represents the universal values and dangers of all societies due to this fundamental conflict of choice and individualism. The freedom of individuals must be limited in order to achieve stability and order within society. The antagonist of A Clockwork Orange is fifteen year-old Alex, a vicious boy with constant violent impulses. Alex rapes, steals, and murders because...
    749 Words | 2 Pages
  • Psychological Concepts in a Clockwork Orange
    Psychological concepts in A Clockwork Orange At the start of A Clockwork Orange, you are introduced to Alex and his droogs. They are at a milkbar drinking milk-plus. Milk, plus types of drugs that enhance Alex and his droogs ultraviolence, which is the main backdrop to the story that leads to other psychological events. Drug addiction is a complex disorder that is compulsive and often uncontrollable. This is a chronic relapsing disorder, and treatment for drug addiction is about as effective as...
    307 Words | 1 Page
  • The representation of youth in 'a clockwork orange' and 'If....'
    The representation of youths in ‘A Clockwork Orange’ and ‘If….’ I will be investigating how youth is represented in the films A clockwork orange (1972) and If…. (1968) and how the films affected the views of the time and how the films influenced youths. I have chosen to investigate these films because of how both films were released at the time of the relaxation of violence in cinema. I also chose these films because the similar themes in both films, as both films focus on youths in society...
    1,448 Words | 4 Pages
  • Beloning--Clockwork Orange and the Wrestler
    The concept of belonging is essential. To belong is to form a connection which will allow a sense of identity to manifest, without this we lose our humanity; however, conformity is in a sense a facade of belonging, as it restrains our freedom and forces us to only mimic. My studied texts show how society demands us to conform, yet conformity prevents a sense of true identity being created. This notion is elaborated within the novel, A Clockwork Orange, a dark testimony to the power of the...
    692 Words | 2 Pages
  • A Clockwork Orange: Summary - 421 Words
    Synopsis: Young Alex and his gang members (Dim, Pete and Georgie) go on a rampage around the futuristic city in London. In the book what we call evil is actually a form of art to Alex. Alex loves art itself, particularly classical music. To Alex, the delight he finds in classical music is closely related to the joy he feels during acts of violence. The State’s destruction of Alex’s ability to make his own moral choices represents a greater evil than any of Alex’s crimes, since turning Alex into...
    421 Words | 2 Pages
  • Belonging - a Clockwork Orange
    The concept of belonging is essential. To belong is to form a connection which will allow a sense of identity, without this we lose our humanity; however, conformity is in a sense a facade of belonging, as it restrains our freedom and forces us to only mimic. My studied texts show how society demands us to conform, yet conformity prevents a sense of true identity being ever created. This notion is elaborated in the novel, A Clockwork Orange. Alex is a criminal who doesn’t belong anywhere within...
    680 Words | 2 Pages
  • A Clockwork Orange - Cinematography - 840 Words
    Note: This is part of a "philosophy in film" class. We watched a movie in class, talked about it, then figured out how different film concepts applied to the movie. I got an A in the class, but I don't remember what I got on this paper. I am sure it was an A though. Text: Different camera positions in a movie can have a great effect on the way the audience interprets or feels about a movie. This is also done by the way each scene is composed and designed. In A Clockwork Orange, all these...
    840 Words | 3 Pages
  • A Clockwork Orange: a Critical Analysis
    Nadsat Language in A Clockwork Orange Anthony Burgess's writing style in his most famous novel, A Clockwork Orange, is different to say the least. This novel is praised for its ingenuity, although many are disturbed by Burgess's predictions for the future. However, for many, it is close to impossible to comprehend without outside help. This is because Burgess created a language specifically for this novel, called Nadsat. This Russian-based language forms conversations between the narrator,...
    1,883 Words | 5 Pages
  • Clockwork Orange Moral Amiguity
    Brent Loth AP English November 10th Moral Ambiguity In the novel, A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess, we are introduced to a bizarre and atypical protagonist, Alex. This young delinquent displays incredible depravity and revels in his random violent actions. In all of his cruelty, he feels no guilt and seems completely uninterested in a moral explanation for his actions. As Alex narrates in disorienting language that is difficult to decipher, one finds themselves yearning to...
    955 Words | 3 Pages
  • Clockwork Orange Analysis - 769 Words
    A Clockwork Orange, by Anthony Burgess, is a satirical novel, in which the society is heavily criticized and is revolved in many controversial issues, regarding to human nature, morality and human freedom. Alex, the protagonist of the novel, shows the darkest side of mankind and society. Due to Alex’s obscene behaviors and crimes that he has committed, the state attempts to cure him with the controversial Ludovico’s Technique, by forcefully “injecting” him with goodness and depriving him from...
    769 Words | 2 Pages
  • Dissecting a Clockwork Orange - 1815 Words
    “You men need to tuck away your penises and surrogate penises (guns), because you will never get anywhere with them. Masculinity is a myth and a dead end.” - Stanley Kubrick Stanley Kubrick’s 1971 classic A Clockwork Orange is an interesting beast. The film has been vilified, banned, condemned on artistic grounds and yet it survives. The film’s hallucinatory visuals depicting a strange, narcissistic modernistic society, steeped in seventies art deco and harsh, contrasting lighting, paint a...
    1,815 Words | 5 Pages
  • A Clockwork Orange and Sense - 1471 Words
    The different pathways used by an individual when moving “into the world” are always framed by the societal context in which they exist. These pathways provide opportunities for the protagonist to experience a wide variety of growth and change. The process of moving away from the past and entering a new world is a complex one that involves sacrifice, change and a sense of unknown. The protagonist can be both willing and forced to make their transition into the world, as can be both prevented and...
    1,471 Words | 4 Pages
  • A Clockwork Orange Book - 752 Words
    Alex is the leader of his gang, has a privileged place in it to enjoy hurting, controlling every detail. Nothing escapes his approval in his misdeeds, and he and the rest enjoy being violent. Gets a unique pleasure to see blood, that is linked to music. Both make him feel an indescribable pleasure when he hits someone. Music is used against him in Ludovico treatment as aversion therapy of violence, and is associated to negative feeling that hurts and makes him feel physically ill (Classical...
    752 Words | 3 Pages
  • A Clockwork Orange - Short Essay
    A Clockwork Orange Ramon Moses Globe University A Clockwork Orange A clockwork Orange is a very unique move that uses a lot of natural lighting throughout the movie. According to the book there are two sources of light, it can be natural or artificial. A Clockwork Orange uses a lot of natural lighting. While watching the making of the movie the audience may notice the use of reflector boards on some of the shots, even though natural lighting was used during the movie. Because of...
    338 Words | 2 Pages
  • A Clockwork Orange Film Analysis
    A Clockwork Orange Film Analysis Stanley Kubrick's Clockwork Orange was a deeply disturbing depiction of human nature that shed light onto dark thoughts in the character's soul. Alex seems to have no regard for human decency or human life. He and his gang of friends kill at will. They have no purpose for their violent outbursts other than to shock and degrade their victims. They have fun making others suffer. This is the logic that is upheld by Friedrich Nietzsche in his approval of...
    554 Words | 2 Pages
  • A Clockwork Orange Essay - 1
    Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Education Department of English Language and Literature BRITISH LITERATURE OF THE 20TH CENTURY An unconvincing twist or necessary completion of the book’s moral integrity? Discuss the ending of A Clockwork Orange. TWENTY-ONE? Richard Borovička 2nd year – Aj-Pg Summer semester 2009 Are we to discuss to what extent the ending of A Clockwork Orange is convincing, at least three levels of viewpoint should be taken into consideration. The...
    1,494 Words | 5 Pages
  • A Clockwork Orange Analysis - 649 Words
    A Clockwork Orange “A Clockwork Orange” is a profound and somewhat disturbing tale of the ultraviolet future of the human race. Its setting is in the near future, most likely sometime in the early twenty-first century. With this fictional society, Burgess depicts a totalitarian state that incorporates elements of both Soviet communism and American capitalism. Like most of the story’s genre, dystopian fiction, Burgess’ novel can be characterized as a logical extension of contemporary conditions...
    649 Words | 2 Pages
  • Psychological Analysis of Film Clockwork Orange
    CHAPTER 1 Introduction and Methodology of Study 1.1 Topic: The topic of the study is “Psychological Analysis of a Film Clockwork Orange”. 1.2 Objective: 1. To analyze the movie based on its structural elements. 2. To analyze the movie based on Adler’s theory of Individual Psychology. 1.3 Importance of the Research: There are two benefits expected from this study they are as follows; * To give additional information and contribution to large body of knowledge *...
    7,165 Words | 19 Pages
  • A Clockwork Orange - Struggles Between the Government
    Struggles between the Government In A Clockwork Orange, Anthony Burgess has created a dark, gloomy socialist state of futuristic world and the theme of this novel deals with the struggles between the governments. The society in the story is inhabited by fearful citizens, wild young outlaws, and a totalitarian government which is unable to control the society's flood of violence. The citizens are more than usually suspicious of strangers, especially after dark, they would not go out to the...
    1,254 Words | 4 Pages
  • Conduct Disorder in the Film a Clockwork Orange
    Kristen Kleiner Abnormal Psychology July 19th, 2012 Alex DeLarge in A Clockwork Orange A Clockwork Orange is set in futuristic Britain. The main character and narrator, Alex DeLarge, is the leader of a sadistic teen gang. Alex introduces his “droogs”, or friends, as Pete, Georgie, and Dim. After getting intoxicated at the Korova Milk Bar, they perform a series of “ultra-violent” crimes. This includes beating a homeless man, fighting a rival gang, and theft. They also play “Hogs of the...
    1,797 Words | 5 Pages
  • Abuse of Power Within a Clockwork Orange
    Abuse of Power within A Clockwork Orange by Christopher Borycheski The choice between good and evil is a decision every man must make throughout his life in order to guide his actions and control his future. This element of choice, no matter what the outcome, displays man's power as an individual. Any efforts to control or influence this choice between good and evil will in turn govern man's free will and enslave him. In the novel A Clockwork Orange, the author uses symbolism through...
    1,339 Words | 4 Pages
  • A Clockwork Orange and Brave New World
    Without loneliness, how could we appreciate love? Without war, how could we appreciate peace? Binary opposition underlies the essence of our world. It is because of this that the term Utopia, usually meaning a place of utmost perfection, is also used to mean an unrealistic ideal that is impossible to achieve. This has, in turn, spawned the concept of dystopia a negative utopia, being a totalitarian and repressive world where the state holds all power over nearly every aspect of public and...
    952 Words | 3 Pages
  • Use of Nasdat in Burgess’ a Clockwork Orange
    Use of nasdat in Burgess’ A Clockwork Orange “And, my brothers, it was real satisfaction to me to waltz-left two three, right two three-and carve left cheeky and right cheeky, so that like two curtains of blood seemed to pour out at the same time, one on either side of his fat filthy oily snout in the winter starlight. ” –Alex, A Clockwork Orange Anthony Burgess’ A Clockwork Orange is set in a futuristic city in a time, not too far off in the future. In this futuristic society, normal...
    1,344 Words | 4 Pages
  • Comparison of a Clockwork Orange and Lord of the Flies
    “Goodness is something chosen. When a man cannot choose he ceases to be a man.” How do Anthony Burgess in A Clockwork Orange and William Golding in Lord of the Flies reflect violence and social responsibility? Both Lord of the Flies, first published in 1954 and A Clockwork Orange, published eight years later, focus on the inherent human capabilities for evil as well as good. The German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche famously posits that ‘whatever is done for love always occurs beyond good...
    2,273 Words | 6 Pages
  • 'A clockwork orange' comparison of book and film
    “‘A Clockwork Orange’ comparison of the book and film.” A Clockwork Orange is a dystopian nightmarish fantasy of a near-future England, where teenage hooligans neglect the somewhat standing laws of society, and take control of the streets after dark. The novel's main character, fifteen year old Alex, and his three 'droogs,' take place in all-night acts of random violence and total destruction. This dark image Burgess has presented to the reader portrays his view of what he believed would be...
    704 Words | 2 Pages
  • Kubrick Contra Nihilism: a Clockwork Orange
    KUBRICK CONTRA NIHILISM: A CLOCKWORK ORANGE Much critical ink has been spilled over the question of whether the world-view of archetypal auteur Stanley Kubrick is nihilistic or not, and appropriately so. To my mind, this is one of the most important questions we can ask about genuine artists and their oeuvres. If auteur criticism is to have any validity, from a philosophical perspective, it must address such issues. True cinematic geniuses (e.g., Bergman, Antonioni, Wertmuller,...
    2,141 Words | 6 Pages
  • Clockwork Cruelty: A Comparison of Stanley Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange and Artaud's Theatre of Cruelty
    Clockwork Cruelty The names Stanley Kubrick and Antonin Artaud are ones that are not often, if ever, heard together in the same sentence. However, this does not mean they have nothing in common. In fact Kubrick's film A Clockwork Orange shares elements with Artaud's Theatre of Cruelty. This is seen in the disorienting use of language, visuals in which “violent physical images crush and hypnotize the sensibility of the spectator” (Cardullo, 375), and...
    2,792 Words | 10 Pages
  • A Clockwork Orange: Good Riddance to Bad Rubbish
    A Clockwork Orange: Good Riddance to Bad Rubbish A Clockwork Orange received critical acclaim, made more than thirty million dollars at the box office, and was nominated for various awards; however, this esteemed film was outlawed from the nation of Great Britain in order to curb its immoral content from permeating society. Before all the controversy began, A Clockwork Orange was a novel, written mostly in Russian, by Anthony Burgess. Stanley Kubrick is known to critics as a film maker who...
    971 Words | 3 Pages
  • A Developmental Study of Alex in Kubrick's a Clockwork Orange
    A Developmental Study of Alex in Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange Synopsis of A Clockwork Orange In A Clockwork Orange, the main character is that of a mildly young child of 15 who, along with his fellow friends, or "Droogs", partake in evenings of Ultra-Violence. Ultra Violence consists of random beatings, theft, destruction, and rape. The main character, Alex, is the self-proclaimed leader of the pack, and makes judgment on their actions pending on his mood. His Droogs eventually find...
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  • A Clockwork Orange Essay Assignment The Ludovico Treatment
    Alexandra Martinez EL3510 :Literature Across Cultures II: Theory 4/26/13 amarti67@oldwestbury.edu A Clockwork Orange Essay Assignment The Ludovico Treatment The psychological conditioning treatment used in A Clockwork Orange , the Ludovico treatment , raises many moral issues. Is it justly to take a persons “free will” to make the world a safer place? In this paper I will discuss different perspectives from the novel, including my own reflection on the treatments moral effect on the...
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  • Death of a Salesman, Wuthering Heights, and a Clockwork Orange
    There is nothing quite like a book the reader never wants to put down. To achieve this a novel must have interesting characters, a dilemma, and convey a lesson. Wuthering Heights, A Clockwork Orange, and The Death of Salesmen each contain these three main elements. All these books keep the reader interested. A Clockwork Orange does the best at fulfilling the readers interests. This novel has well developed characters. Even though the main character, Alex, commits horrible acts of violence to...
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  • A Clockwork Orange: Teaching Ethics Through a Violent Criminal
    A Clockwork Orange: Teaching Ethics through a Violent Criminal Every thirty seconds a new book comes out; in fact, reading just the titles of every book ever printed would take thirteen years (Hornby). Based on those kinds of numbers, deciding what books one should single out and read seems a task of enormous importance. Which books are significant enough that any person—all people being of such limited time—should go to the bother of reading? Which books best enrich the mind? There’s a...
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  • A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess: A Literary Response
    Nadine Gordimer, South African writer and Nobel Prize winner, said that penetrating fiction doesn’t give answers, it invites questions. This quote is accurately reflected in Anthony Burgess’ novel, A Clockwork Orange, in which many questions and moral values are explored. Burgess strongly believed that humans’ ability of choice is the only factor distinguishing us between animals or machines. The two most predominant recurring themes of and questions relating to the novel involve ‘good vs...
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  • A Clockwork Orange" Is a Film About a Gang of "Droogs
    "A Clockwork Orange" "A Clockwork Orange" is a film about a gang of "droogs" who take pleasure in crime. They enjoy raping and torturing their innocent victims for their own pleasure. The main characters' name is Alex. Alex's diagnosis is Antisocial Personality Disorder (Psychopath). When caught and arrested, classical conditioning is used in order to rid Alex of his vindictive thoughts, but is not very successful. Antisocial Personality Disorder is a Disorder that cannot be easily...
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  • Anti-hero on Clockwork Orange and the film Unforgiven
    An anti-hero is a literary concept with long tradition. The idea of an antithesis to an anti-hero began its first appear in literature as early as in the Greek novel Don Quixote, but the bloom of a modern time anti-hero can be traced back to the period of Romanticism. Through the view of an anti-hero, we are ultimately challenged to look at ourselves and our contemporary world and recognise the complexity of human condition. In Clockwork Orange and Unforgiven, the dichotomist relationship...
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  • The colour Purple & Clockwork Orange Character Analysis
    Compare Celie, From alice Walkers the Colour Purple and Alex, from A clockwork orange. The colour purple is an account of Celie’s, life told in epistolary form. Celie is a black woman living in Georgia, USA. She writes to both her sister and God. Throughout the novel we learn about her naivety and how all her life men are the enemy. She is a quiet and loving character which is why it is so easy for the audience to sympathise with her. A Clockwork Orange is a dystopian novella, set in the near...
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  • ‘to What Extent Are the Protagonists in 1984 and a Clockwork Orange Similar’
    To a certain extent the protagonists of A Clockwork Orange and 1984 are similar because they are both controlled, either by totalitarianism or a certain force. Winston is controlled by the power of his mind, and the supremacy or a higher being-BIG BROTHER-. Furthermore both protagonists are rebellious, yet violent. Winston rebels against the authority by writing in his diary “DOWN WITH BIG BORHTER.” What’s more is Winston’s violent nature. The ‘Two Minute Hate’ supports this. Yet also the...
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  • Alienation and Integration the Usage of Marked Language in “a Clockwork Orange”
    Alienation and Integration The Usage of Marked Language in “A Clockwork Orange” In Anthony Burgess' novel „A Clockwork Orange“ from 1962, the author's use of a newly created language[i], Nadsat, plays a key role in the presentation of the main protagonist Alex DeLarge, and his schoolboy sociopathy. Corrupt and naive, 15-year-old Alex narrates his own story with a language that only the author and the characters in his fictional world could truly understand; specifically those characters...
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  • A Clockwork Orange as an Allusion to Plato's Mimetic Imagination
    According to Plato, a philosopher enters the realm of universal knowledge when his understanding is purely an abstract science. At this stage, the philosopher is in touch with the ultimate “Form of the Good,” and knows what is best for man. Imagination plays an integral role in reaching the Form of Good, because it serves as a means to which students can understand abstract ideas and eventually reach universal thought. In his pre-modern narrative The Republic of Plato, however, Plato finds that...
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  • Dystopia vs Utopia ( a Clockwork Orange vs. Player Piano
    Utopia can be defined as a place immune from inhumane treatment and absent of the hardships of society , where the population is blindfolded from fear, anxiety, and general negative aspects of human nature. A utopia can be generalized as that perfect society. This is one type of a drastic society. There is another, more appalling type of society, that of a dystopia. A Dystopia is nor a fairyland or the promised-land like the utopia is, it looks at the chaos, anarchy, rebellion and...
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  • Comparison of "A Clockwork Orange" and "Dog Day Afternoon": Left and right cycle films.
    I want to explore the concept of "left cycle" films using the article entitled "The Left and Right Cycles" by Robert Ray. To help me explore what makes up a "left cycle" film, I will compare two movies, both "left cycle" according to Ray. Those movies are "Dog Day Afternoon" and "Clockwork Orange". What makes both of these movies "left cycle", and how to they differ within that classification? First, I think it is important to differentiate between the "left" and "right" movies. What Ray says...
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  • A Clockwork Orange "Eat This Sweetish Segment or Spit It Out. You Are Free."
    A Clockwork Orange "Eat this sweetish segment or spit it out. You are free." -Anthony Burgess Anthony Burgess has been heralded as one of the greatest literary geniuses of the twentieth century. Although Burgess has over thirty works of published literature, his most famous is A Clockwork Orange. Burgess's novel is a futuristic look at a Totalitarian government. The main character, Alex, is an "ultra-violent" thief who has no problem using force against innocent...
    2,182 Words | 5 Pages
  • Compare the society that Orwell creates in 1984 with the one that Burgess creates in ‘A Clockwork orange’
    Compare the society that Orwell creates in 1984 with the one that Burgess creates in ‘A Clockwork orange’ Link your observations to the two writers, their contexts and their views on their own society. The two novels that these writers are famous for link together in many ways. Despite the different time periods and views in which the writers effectively portray they share the key idea of a dystopian society. In this essay I will attempt to explore the differences as well as the...
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  • A Clockwork Orange: the Feelingless and Affectless Man, Living in a Mechanical Society
    A Clockwork Orange: The Feelingless and Affectless Man, Living In a Mechanical Society In today's society the value of one's being has been abused. No longer do we foster the idea of nurturing our young, rather society has become detached from showing and sharing emotion. Becoming a society focused on technology, people have become merely objects of a mechanical society. Technology has reached an era of denaturing human nature; technology has made society lazy by making everything...
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  • clock work orange - 3114 Words
    Part 1: Alex's world[edit] Alex, a teenager living in near-future England, leads his gang on nightly orgies of opportunistic, random "ultra-violence." Alex's friends ("droogs" in the novel's Anglo-Russian slang, 'Nadsat') are: Dim, a slow-witted bruiser who is the gang's muscle; Georgie, an ambitious second-in-command; and Pete, who mostly plays along as the droogs indulge their taste for ultra-violence. Characterised as a sociopath and a hardened juvenile delinquent, Alex is also intelligent...
    3,114 Words | 9 Pages
  • ‘Characters faced with difficult choices are the most interesting to read about.’ Brighton Rock/Clockwork Orange
    In both ‘A Clockwork Orange’ and ‘Brighton Rock’ characters are faced with choices that develop and intensify the plot, making the novels both stimulating and thought provoking to read. Brighton rock’s Pinkie is aware of the choices he makes, though he acknowledges the difference between right and wrong he falls foul to the temptation of wrongdoing. Pinkie choses damnation over salvation, the decision derives from the fact Pinkie is aware of God but refuses the idea of being pure and good...
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  • A Clock Work Orange - 897 Words
    The Protagonist in Clockwork Orange, Alex, exposes the flaws of his society and its significance by showings different aspects of dystopian societies and how they ultimately effected him. The flaws of a dystopian society tend to be endless, but in Clockwork Orange Anthony Burgess thoroughly examines three, which in result take way Alex’s life as well as many others other what? in these type of dystopian societies. Burgess shows how every human is given at birth inalienable rights that they by...
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  • Belonging Essay. - 1303 Words
    ‘An individual’s interaction with others and the world around them can enrich or limit their experience of belonging.” Discuss this view with detailed reference ( 2010 HSC Question) Considered a fundamental aspect of being human, belonging is an ambiguous concept which can offer individuals a sense of identity, security and connectedness. Experiences of belonging are closely related to a person’s interaction with others, as positive experiences can enrich their sense of belonging, and negative...
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  • Society vs. Freedom - 342 Words
    Society vs. Freedom The freedom of individuals to make choices becomes problematic when those choices undermine the safety and stability of society, and in A Clockwork Orange, the state is willing to protect society by taking away freedom of choice and replacing it with prescribed good behavior. In Alex's world, both the unfettered power of the individual and the unfettered power of the state prove dangerous. Alex steals, rapes, and murders merely because it feels good, but when his violent...
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  • Classical Conditioning - 853 Words
    Classical conditioning has also found its way into the realms of entertainment. The most notable example of this is the 1962 novel A Clockwork Orange written by Anthony Burgess and it subsequent 1971 movie directed by the late Stanley Kubrick (Internet Movie Database.) A Clockwork Orange details the activities of a young ultra-violet protagonist named Alex. Alex is "cured" of his evil tendencies via classical conditioning. He is forced to watch various films depicting ultra-violence (US) and the...
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  • Beginning the Evening with a Bit of Ultra-Violence
    Violet Hamlet Goldman AP Lang per 1 10 April 2013 Beginning the Evening With a Bit of Ultra-Violence The movie A Clockwork Orange touches on rather interesting topics such as the corruption of government and our society and also the reoccurring theme of sex and violence. The film could be considered a classic of the adolescent vs society. The brutal violence and some rape scenes are a bit much but are done in a way to help the theme and idea of the film as a whole. In 1971, Stanley...
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  • Cool Hand Luke - 903 Words
    Throughout life, one is taught that there are certain things that are right, and other things that are considered wrong. Amongst these teachings, one of the first lessons that a human being learns is to obey authority. A child is initially taught to obey his parents, and as he grows older, this authority figure changes from a parent into a teacher into a boss. However, amongst every group or community, a few figures stand out as people who refuse to obey the authoritarian figure simply because...
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  • Compare the theme of a young person growing up in two or more literary works you have studied
    Growing up is a current issue nowadays with children and youngsters seeming to enter the adult world earlier and earlier and having to take on the responsibilities of adults. When does a child become an adult? For many the right answer is that it has nothing to do with age; it is determined by the behaviour. In this essay I will not go into the issue of when a child turns into an adult but rather think about how the issue is treated in "A Clockwork Orange" by Anthony Burgess, "The Catcher in the...
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  • Othello and the Outisder - 1028 Words
    Advanced English Essay The Outsider Aakanksha Sharma, 11EnN How have the texts encountered in your studies enriched your understanding of the Outsider? Texts: Othello, Visual Representation and A Clockwork Orange Word Count: 997 words The play Othello by William Shakespeare, the book A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess and the visual representation enrich understanding of the concept of the outsider through their use of both visual and literary techniques to depict outcast...
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  • The Human Condition, Related Texts
    The human condition is full of contradictions, a state of mystery which involves the joyous aspects of life, as well as the sorrowful. The play 'A Streetcar Named Desire,' written by Tennessee Williams, represents this paradox that is capable of inspiring us or swiftly casting us down into the depths of depression. Stanley Kubrik's film 'A Clockwork Orange' contrastingly examines the concept of free-will and the effects of its intervention, while Marko Bok's 'Woman on Bondi Beach' celebrates...
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  • Conditioning and Mind Control Essay
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  • wvwv - 1093 Words
    Fede: In “A Clockwork Orange”, one of the leit motifs of the story, is the sadistic violence that overcomes Alex’s character, throughout this quotes we are going to analyse the obsession towards violent acts that this misfit is trapped. Alex starts evoking his obsession from the beginning of the book when he and his “droogs” attack an innocent old men when going out of a library,“…and that made the old veck start moaning a lot then, then out comes the blood, my brothers, real beautiful. So...
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  • belonging - 2605 Words
    In essence, an individual’s interaction with others, whether that interaction is positive or negative, can either enrich or limit their experience of belonging. The idea that negative interactions between an individual or others is directly related to their limited experience of belonging is extensively explored within Peter Skrzynecki’s St. Patrick’s College and Stanley Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange, as the protagonists in each text have a limited experience of belonging due to their negative...
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  • How Being Single Has Benefits
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    811 Words | 2 Pages
  • Choosing Your Own Side: the Human Mind as a Tool in Controlled Chaos
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  • Confessions of a Mask Summary Response
    Madeline Wischow Rice Pre-AP World Lit and Comp. Period 2 Confessions of a Mask is a “decent, solid book,” telling the story of a young man who is gradually discovering his sexuality in a proper, postwar Japan. “[It is] not so much about blatant homosexuality… but more the psycho-emotional impacts such feelings can have,” says Jessica Schneider, the author of “Book Review of Confessions of a Mask by Yukio Mishima.” Despite seeming to praise the book in the beginning of her review,...
    558 Words | 2 Pages
  • How Do Speeches Offer Practical Solutions and Optimism in Times of Social Division and Racial Conflict?
    Great speeches offering practical solutions, optimism for the future and moral clarity can unify and motivate people in times of social conflict and racial division. Subsequently, an understanding of people and the world is developed, and a relationship between the voice and the audience is created. This profound level of optimism and hope can be seen in JFK’s Inaugural Address, and Jessie Street’s Is It to Be Back to the Kitchen? A relative distinctive voice is also significantly found in...
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  • The Life and Work of Anthony Burgess
    The Life and Work of Anthony Burgess "Autobiography: Story of one's life, written by oneself."(Halsey 64). Everyone knows what an autobiography is, but not so many people realize that although not all authors write a book that can be called a factual autobiography, many authors frequently allow personal, real life experiences to influence their fictional writings. An excellent example of such an author is Anthony Burgess. Anthony Burgess is recognized today as an English novelist, critic,...
    1,871 Words | 5 Pages
  • Isu for History - 571 Words
    Explanation of why I choose this Topic: I chose this topic simply because of my interest towards evaluating main characters. Both the film Iron Man and the novel A Clockwork Orange, share a similarity in which characters consisted of such acts, attitudes, and behaviors; that were not accepted by others. In this topic, I am able to closely examine the main characters, and to study their personality and their daily lives. My interest focuses on character aspects, and how they developed...
    571 Words | 2 Pages
  • Compare Different Representations of Either Male or Female Characters in the Films You Have Studied
    Chloé Haley Film Studies Compare different representations of either male or female characters in the films you have studied In the films I studied, (A clockwork Orange, From Russia with love, Carry on camping and a Hard days night) women are represented in similar ways but in very different circumstances. Firstly in A Clockwork Orange, women are seen as an objectified sexual obsession to the male gang. In almost every seen of the film women are presented in one way shape or form for...
    682 Words | 2 Pages
  • Belonging Speech - 1004 Words
    “Belonging fulfils our emotional needs” Belonging may fulfil our emotional needs, it has the ability to decide or alters one’s mind, and it may provide us the joy that we need from a sense of acceptance or the unpreventable discomfort from isolation. Belonging is shaped within the personal experience; it has the power to change us, emotionally and physically. Texts show us the importance of belonging as they explore the many aspects, including the potential to enrich or challenge a belief. This...
    1,004 Words | 3 Pages

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