"Attachment Theory" Essays and Research Papers

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Attachment Theory

References Agrawal, H., Gunderson, J., Holmes, B., Lyons-Ruth, K. (2004) ‘Attachment Studies with Borderline Patients: A Review’ Harvard Review of Psychiatry, Volume 12, No. 2   Ainsworth, M. & Bell, S. (1970) ‘Attachment, exploration, and separation: Illustrated by the behaviour of one-year-olds in a strange situation’. Child Development, 41, 49-67. Ainsworth, M. D. S. (1973). ‘The development of infant-mother attachment’, in B. Cardwell & H. Ricciuti (Eds.). Review of child development research...

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Attachment Theory

In this essay I have selected 3 different theories, which will focus on human growth development theories, I will demonstrate my understanding of each theory and explain the psychological disturbances which are linked to each one and demonstrate how these theory can be off use to the counsellor in therapy. John Bowbly (1969) and Mary Ainsworths (1974) known, as the mother and father of attachment theory both became key figures in contributing to child development, with their ideas of personality...

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Attachment Theory

Attachment Theory The Attachment theory is focused on the relationships and bonds between people, particularly long-term relationships including those between a parent and child and between romantic partners. Attachment is an emotional bond to another person. Psychologist John Bowlby (1969, 1988) was the first attachment theorist, describing attachment as a "lasting psychological connectedness between human beings." Bowlby believed that the earliest bonds formed by children with their caregivers...

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Attachment Theory

According to Feldman (2008), the emotional bond that develops between a child and a certain individual is referred to as attachment. In nonhumans, this process begins in the first days of life with “imprinting,” which is essentially the infant’s readiness to learn (Lorenz, 1957, as cited in Feldman, 2008, p.89). The bond is facilitated by mother-child physical contact during imprinting. A similar phenomenon is observed between human mothers and their newborns, which is why mother’s are strongly encouraged...

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Attachment Theory

to others effectively. Furthermore, describing the role of parents, what influences that role, parents as role models and how parents implement different parenting styles and their impact? As well as focusing on children's first relationships, attachments and how they relate to others as they develop towards adulthood. The role of a parent is to care for a child's biological needs, provide safe environment, to protect and manage discipline however reality is these are not always met. The parent role...

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bolwbys theory of attachment

Bowlby’s Evolutionary Theory of Attachment. (12mark) Attachment can be described using two theories, one being Bowlby’s attachment theory which is based on an evolutionary perspective. The theory suggests that evolution has produced a behaviour that is essential to the survival to allow the passing on of genes. An infant that keeps close to their mother is more likely to survive. The traits that lead to that attachment will be naturally selected. Bowlby has the idea that attachment has evolved and it...

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The Evolutionary Theory of Attachment

The Evolutionary Theory of Attachment Bowlby's evolutionary theory consists of a number of essential factors. The evolutionary theory of attachment as proposed by John Bowlby (1907-1990) suggests that attachment, in terms of adaptation, is essential for survival. In order to progress healthily, children are born with an innate tendency to form attachments. This means that infants are pre-programmed to become attached to their caregiver. This is supported by the research of Lorenz (1952) in...

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Ainsworth Attachment Theory

Before Bowlby and Ainsworth came forth with attachment theory, the role parental attentiveness played in the cognitive and psychological development of the child was widely understated. Although similar theorists such as Piaget, Erickson, Freud, Kohlberg and Braufenbreener all vied for secured interactions between mothers and infants, their comments appeared to be understated in light of the developmental theories (Crain, 2010). As such, the theory positions itself as an incredible strength. When...

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Human Attachment Theory

Human Attachment to Animals Animal’s play and enormous part in a lot of people’s every day lives .We eat them, breed them, train them, and keep them as pets. Keeping animals as pets can cause many humans to become extremely attached. Just like humans becoming attached to other humans, many people say they feel the same about their pets. A theory has been developed called the attachment theory, which was first formed in relation with humans being attached to other humans. As time has passed a...

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Bowlby s attachment theory

Bowlby’s Attachment Theory Bowlby’s attachment theory is based on the evolution. He suggests that when children are born they already are programed to form attachment with others because it is an important factor in surviving. Bowlby believed that need of attachment is instinctive and will be activated by any conditions that seem to threaten the achievement such as insecurity, separation and fear. He also mentioned that fear of strangers is also natural factor which is important in survival of the...

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