Women's Life in 19th Century

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How far did life improve for women in the 19th century?

Life for women changed dramatically in the 19th century. They were given more rights, started to become more equal to men, and more of them were recognised for certain talents such as writing. The way women lived was improved across all areas of their actions, beginning the way women are treated now. The average woman was expected to have children, carry out everything around the house and do what she was told. Many people consistently attempted to demonstrate that women where just as equal to men, and that they should get rights identical to theirs. Over the centuries the change did steadily happen, but the most dramatic alterations were in the 19th century, and so below is information on how and what changed, why, the most important aspect out of everything that happened, and why it meant that women’s lives were transformed for good.

Why women’s lives were improved
Women did a variety of things in the 19th century to get the rights and changes they wanted. The goal they wanted to achieve more than anything else was the right to vote, and they did finally manage this, but to get there they did all sorts of things! For example; 1. Women protested time and time again, everywhere, anywhere and in front of whoever they thought they might get across to. 2. They also campaigned a lot outside of important buildings where the decision making all went on. 3.

Sports
In the 19th century women did very little sport as it was considered “Un-ladylike”. Two sports women were allowed to play were croquet and archery.
The Change
In 1884, women played at Wimbledon for the first time. This meant women finally started to feel more accepted

Childbirth
Childbirth was for a long time painful. There were no available medications that could be taken to stop the struggle of giving birth, and so women just had to deal with it.
The Change
When James Simpson (who was a Professor of Midwifery at

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