Nothing really

Good Essays
Geography – study of world
What is cultural geography?
: interested in cultural landscapes
Anthropology: study of human life
Ethnography is representation of culture
Human came from the earth
Diyih = “supernatural power”
Discussion of the chapter
Wisdom Sits in Places: Landscape and Language Among the Western Apache Summary & Study Guide Description
Wisdom Sits in Places: Landscape and Language Among the Western Apache Summary & Study Guide includes comprehensive information and analysis to help you understand the book. This study guide contains the following sections:
Plot SummaryChaptersImportant PeopleObjects/PlacesThemesStyleQuotesThis detailed literature summary also contains Topics for Discussion and a Free Quiz on Wisdom Sits in Places: Landscape and Language Among the Western Apache by Keith H. Basso.
Wisdom Sits in Places analyzes the relationship between geographical location, cultural symbolism and place-names in the language and linguistic practices of the Western Apache tribe located in Cibecue, Arizona. The author, Keith Basso, is an anthropologist and ethnographer who argues that the field of anthropology does not study the relationship place, language and culture.
Basso first visited Cibecue in 1959 when he was a student. After writing about the Western Apache in a scholarly setting, Basso became bored and so decided to visit the White Mountain Apache Tribe directly in order to make maps the tied Apache place-names to their geographical referents and to records the stories and symbols located with those stories. In the process, Basso secured a grant from the NSF and spent eighteen months over five years (between 1979 and 1983) with the Western Apache, making maps and taking notes.
Wisdom Sits in Places is a short book, composed of four largely independent essays. All focus on the main topic of the book, but they emphasize different points. Each essay also uses a particular member of the Apache Tribe in order to connect a

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