Much Ado

Topics: Love, Metaphor, Goddess Pages: 6 (700 words) Published: February 1, 2014
Beatrice getting tricked by Hero and Ursula that
Benedick is in love with her.

Hero and Ursula talks about how scornful and
disdain Beatrice is.

What is the scene about?
What is this scene about?

Give not this rotten orange to your friend. (4.1
Line 29)
Don’t insult a friend by giving him a beautiful
orange that rots inside. (4.1 Line 29)

They satirize(?) Beatrice that she is too proud of
herself that she will not have any rooms for love.

After hearing their conversation, Beatrice is
deceived. She determines to give up her past
scornful attitude but instead, accept Benedick's
love.

Metaphors

Theme

Theme

Imagery
Metaphors

Characters
Act 3 Scene 1

Act 4 Scene 1

Oh, what authority and show of truth
Can cunning sin cover itself withal! (4.1 line
32-33)
Oh, sin can disguise itself so artfully! (4.1 line
32-33)

Literary Devices

Much Ado About Nothing IOC

Characters

CLAUDIO
Out on thee, seeming! I will write against it.
You seem to me as Dian in her orb,
As chaste as is the bud ere it be blown.
But you are more intemperate in your blood
Than Venus, or those pampered animals
That rage in savage sensuality. (4.1 53-58)

Ursula
Analogy

Possible extract for IOC
Benedick (although he doesn't appear in the
scene)

Why did Shakespeare had many analogies to
the Greek gods and goddesses? Such as
Diana (virgin goddess of moon and hunting),
Venus (goddess of beauty), Cupid (god of
love). Was Greek gods something that people
living in Shakespearean era familiar with?

goddess of the hunt and moon; Venus was the
goddess of love generally portrayed as fickle and
promiscuous.) in her orbit—as virginal as the

flower bud before it blooms. But you’re
actually as hot-blooded as Venus, or a
pampered animal allowed to run wild.

Possible extract for IOC

We also have a simile here "As chaste are is
the bud ere it be blown"

When we are finding literary devices in
Shakespeare, can we refer to modern
language to make the explanation easier?
Juxtaposition

CLAUDIO
Oh Hero, you could have equaled the
MYTHICAL HERO
The mythical Hero, who died for her lover, Leander,
was considered the model of perfect love.

mythical Hero if only half your outward beauty
matched your inner thoughts and desires!
Goodbye, beautiful sinner. Goodbye to your
pure wickedness and your wicked purity.
Because of you, I’ll keep myself away from
love. I’ll hang suspicion on my eyelids (what is
this LD? Is this is a hyperbole/exaggeration?),
so that all the beautiful things I see are
transformed into dangers and are never able
to trick me again.

Hero

Beatrice

Literary Devices

CLAUDIO
Curse you for your false appearances! To me,
you seemed like Diana (Diana was the virgin

CLAUDIO
O Hero, what a Hero hadst thou been
If half thy outward graces had been placed
About thy thoughts and counsels of thy heart!
But fare thee well, most foul, most fair!
Farewell,
Thou pure impiety and impious purity.
For thee I’ll lock up all the gates of love,(what
is this LD?)
And on my eyelids shall conjecture hang,
To turn all beauty into thoughts of harm,
And never shall it more be gracious. (4.1
98-106)

Analogy

Visual imageries

Personification

[Shakespeare Language]
FRIAR FRANCIS
(to CLAUDIO) You come hither, my lord, to
marry this lady?

Diction

Read till http://nfs.sparknotes.com/
muchado/page_160.html

CLAUDIO
No.

Others
Shakespeare getting fancy with the word play

LEONATO
To be married to her.—Friar, you come to
marry her.
Leonato must have felt dismay for a while and
he didn't want to accept what Claudio meant
by "No". So he swiftly joins the conversation to
suppress conflicts. Claudio's "No" could be the
foreshadow of his rage on Hero's
misunderstood conduct.

[Modern Language]
FRIAR FRANCIS
(to CLAUDIO) Have you come here, my lord,
to marry this lady?
CLAUDIO
No.
LEONATO
No, he comes to be married to her....
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