Labeling and Conflict Theory Essay Example

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Abstract
Labeling theory was felt in the late 1960's and early 1970's. Labeling theroy states that official reactio to the delinquent acts, help label youths as criminals, troublemakers, and outcasts and lock them in a cycleof escalating delinquent acts of social sanctions. Social conflict theory focuses on why governments make and enforce rules of the law. Conflict theorists believe that the conflict between the haves and have-notsof society can occur in any social system.
Labeling and Conflict Theory Defined
Labeling theory is concerned less with that causes the onset of an initial delinquent act and more with the effect that official handling by police, courts, and correctional agencies has on the future of youths who fall into the curt system. The labeling theory states that youths violate the law for a number of reasons. these reasons are poor family relationships, neighborhood conflict, peer pressure, psychological and biological abnormality and delinquent learning experiences. Cesare Lombroso (0835-1919), an Italian who was called the father of Modern Criminology, originally came up with the labeling theory. Lombroso claimed that "criminals represent of form of degeneracy that was manifested in physical characteristics reflective of earlier forms of evolution. He described criminals as atavistic, and throwbacks to an earlier revlutionay life. Lombroso classified criminals into 4 major catergories a0born criminals,b) insane criminals, c)occasional criminals, d)criminal of passion.
EFFECTS OF LABELING
Labeling theory focuses mainly on society's reaction to the persons and their behavior and effects of thir behavior. Lableing theorist think that the treatment of offenders in the labeling process depends on their behavior than on others may view their acts. If a person is labeled he or she will become a social outcast. These social outcasts will not be able to enjoy a higher education, well paying jobs and other benefits. Negative labels

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