Kant vs. Rousseau Essay Example

Better Essays
GLST 301
Ally Hunt
The Rise of Man Kind: Societal Progression through Enlightenment History is what we learn from; it shows the mistakes and tribulations of man. History demonstrates progression of the human mind and capabilities. It is my belief that we would not be where we are today without the advances of science and its inherent development of modern society. The day our minds started thinking that there is a better way, or more than one way, to go about things is the day humans started striving for a richer, more intellectual state of being. Without the modern advances over the many years man has populated the earth there would not be the democratic system that we call a society. Without the conveniences of modern luxuries we would have an entirely different stature of limitations than we perceive there to be. Kant claims in his second thesis that nature intended us to achieve great things; that man becomes powerful because nature pushed us to apply all of our capacity to rise above instinct and nature and begin to learn how to provide for ourselves. Rousseau does not see it that way; he feels that the rise of modern science only lead to conflict and false optimism in believing the power of the human race. I will be dissecting these two points of views using quoted material and my own personal logic and reflections.
When reading Kant’s Perpetual Peace I found myself agreeing with a lot of his theories. He articulates that the notion of progress is more important than progress itself, meaning, being able to see the pattern or growth in the species develop creates the prominent suggestion that modernization and adaptation is within our capabilities. Kant also claims that nature wants us to do everything on our own, and take credit for our successes.
“Nature seems to have taken delight in the greatest frugality and to have calculated her animal endowments so closely-so precisely to the most pressing needs of a primitive existence-that she seems to have

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    Kant Vs Rousseau

    • 1563 Words
    • 7 Pages

    There are two political theories that I combined and will implement if I were to be placed as the highest-ranking official of the country. These are the theories of Immanuel Kant and Jean-Jacques Rousseau. I chose to unite the two theories because both of them, as I was reading through its contents, had the biggest impact on me than all the other theories I researched for. The joined theories would build up my ideal state as a leader of the country so that I may be able to take the people to a better…

    • 1563 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Kant and Rousseau

    • 2384 Words
    • 10 Pages

    The Influence of Kant and Rousseau on the Enlightenment The eighteenth century was a time of rapid change and development in the way people viewed humans and their interaction with others in society. Many countries experience revolution and monarchies were overthrow. People began to question the values that were ingrained in society and governments that ruled them. Two of the biggest philosophers of that time were Immanuel Kant and Jean-Jacques Rousseau, who both ignite the overthrow of tradition…

    • 2384 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Human nature is the basic substance shared by human beings, and is thus important in making sense of society and all its complexities along with the individual man and his liberties. Two prominent philosophers, Rousseau and Kant, express conjectures on human nature in their essays. Rousseau focuses on man in the untainted state of nature. He believes that the lack of knowledge and morality in savage man is better than the evils resulting from social inequalities, insisting a shift towards what once…

    • 896 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    • According to Rousseau, the original condition of mankind was a peaceful and quixotic time in which people lived solitary, uncomplicated lives. This differs from Locke's concept of the state of nature in that, his natural condition of mankind was a state liberty in which one was able to conduct one's life as they saw fit. Like Rousseau's, it was a time of peace between the people, but Locke's was not necessarily a solitary life. • The state of nature for Locke was a state wherein there were no…

    • 412 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Furthermore, in historical context, the obligation to the state has been explained by many political philosophers such as, Jean Jacques Rousseau, Immanuel Kant, and David Hume. Rousseau believed in a social contract, while Hume had a more pragmatic approach focusing on the usefulness of the state, and Kant focused on an individuals moral obligation to the state. Rousseau, describes the relationship between the state and a person as contractual, thereby explaining the state as a place with no law or morality…

    • 533 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    the taking of one’s life by one’s own hand without assistance. Mercy Killing is also a term used and it refers to someone taking a direct action to terminate a person’s life without the person’s permission. Within this paper I will discuss Immanuel Kant and the utilitarianism ethical theories revolving around the issues of euthanasia. Euthanasia or “mercy killing/death” as it may be referred to as has become more complex as the centuries go on; there are three specific forms of Euthanasia. There…

    • 1877 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Marx Vs Rousseau Essay

    • 1948 Words
    • 8 Pages

    Rousseau and Marx both address a notion of "chains" in society in their writings and have defined this notion to be very different sets of constraints. Rousseau concluded that the "chains" that restrict society is one in the form of laws. Marx, on the other hand, sees the "chains" to be that of a class struggle. This leaves us with many questions, ranging from the legitimacy of the chains on society and if society could exist without them. Taking both writers views of "chains" into view one can…

    • 1948 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Arendt Vs Rousseau

    • 700 Words
    • 3 Pages

    problem of human plurality in politics. Rousseau’s and Arendt’s have similar ideas on the people and their relationship to power and being governed but they express them threw different viewpoints. Rousseau and Arendt use slavery as examples to prove…

    • 700 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    Hobbes vs. Rousseau

    • 1427 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Hobbes vs. Rousseau Drug abuse is obviously a huge issue in our country, but how would Hobbes and Rousseau’s opinions differ on it? Hobbes talks about individual self interests and punishment. Rousseau talks about education and socialization. The both believe however that the sovereign should decide these laws Hobbes’ law of nature can be summarized as a general rule discovered by reason that forbids a person from doing anything destructive to his own life and gives her the right of self-preservation…

    • 1427 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Kant vs. Mill

    • 1576 Words
    • 7 Pages

    Kant vs Mills in Animal Rights In this essay I will cover the philosophy of Immanuel Kant and John Stuart Mill. I will begin by covering Kant perspective of rational beings and his idea of a priori learning. I will then move on to his idea of categorical imparaitive. After Kant I will discuss Mill’s utilitarian theory regarding pleasure and pain. With a better understanding of those I will move to Mill’s idea of a posteriori and hypothetical imperative. Following the ideas of these philosophers…

    • 1576 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Powerful Essays